Database : MEDLINE
Search on : L01.178.682.389 [DeCS Category]
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PMID:29283539
Author:Mouthon JM
Title:Médicins Savoyard qui ont soutenu leur these de doctorat en France au XIX siècle, à Paris principalement. [In process]
Source:Vesalius; 22(2):37-43, 2016 Dec.
ISSN:1373-4857
Country of publication:Belgium
Language:fre
Abstract:Savoy, annexed by the French Revolution from 1792 to 1815, became again Sardinian within the kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia until 1860, the year of annexation to France. These changes have not prevented many students from Savoy to come to France for their medical studies, mostly in Paris. While disorganized by the Revolution, medical training and education systems were put in order as of 1803. The Theses of 142 Savoy students (found largely thanks to foreign students in Paris file prepared by Pierre Moulinier) could be consulted in the archives of the Bibliothèque interuniversitaire de santé de Paris. Accordingly, were studied the geographical origin of candidates, thesis topics, age of the students, the philanthropic Savoisienne society of Paris, the Savoy students who exercised in Paris, the students who were former militaries and the doctors who had a local or national political mandate. A similar study at the Faculty of Turin would allow to better understand the migratory flows of these students.
Publication type:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE


  2 / 1109 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28646707
Author:Nordsteien A; Horntvedt MT; Syse J
Address:Faculty of Social Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, P.O. Box 4, St. Olavs plass, N-0130 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: Anita.Nordsteien@hioa.no.
Title:Use of research in undergraduate nursing students' theses: A mixed methods study.
Source:Nurse Educ Today; 56:23-28, 2017 Sep.
ISSN:1532-2793
Country of publication:Scotland
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: Health care personnel are expected to be familiar with evidence-based practice (EBP). Asking clinical questions, conducting systematic literature searches and conducting critical appraisal of research findings have been some of the barriers to EBP. To improve undergraduate nurses' research skills, a collaborative library-faculty teaching intervention was established in 2012. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate how the collaborative library-faculty teaching intervention affected the nursing students' research skills when writing their final theses. DESIGN AND SETTING: Both quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis were used. The study focused on a final year undergraduate nurse training programme in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 194 theses submitted between 2013 and 2015 were collected and assessed. The students were exposed to the intervention for respectively one, two and three years during this period. METHODS: Descriptive statistics were used to compare each year's output over the three-year period and to examine the frequency of the use of various databases, types of information and EBP-tools. Qualitative data was used to capture the students' reasoning behind their selection processes in their research. RESULTS: The research skills with regard to EBP have clearly improved over the three years. There was an increase in employing most EBP-tools and the justifications were connected to important EBP principles. The grades in the upper half of the grading scale increased from 66.7 to 82.1% over the period 2013 to 2015, and a correlation was found between grades and critical appraisal skills. CONCLUSIONS: The collaborative library-faculty teaching intervention employed has been successful in the promotion of nursing student research skills as far as the EBP principles are concerned. Writing a thesis in the undergraduate nursing programme is important to develop and practice these research skills.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  3 / 1109 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28300734
Author:Gogate PM; Biswas P; Natarajan S; Nayak BK; Gopal S; Shah Y; Basak SK
Address:All Ophthalmological Society, New Delhi; Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College; Community Eye Care Foundation, Dr. Gogate's Eye Clinic, Pune, Maharashtra, India.
Title:Residency evaluation and adherence design study: Young ophthalmologists' perception of their residency programs II: Academics and Research dissertation.
Source:Indian J Ophthalmol; 65(1):12-18, 2017 Jan.
ISSN:1998-3689
Country of publication:India
Language:eng
Abstract:PURPOSE: To know the perception of young ophthalmologists about their dissertation and academics during residency training in order to improve the research output during present residency programs in India. METHODS: A survey was conducted by Academic and Research Committee of the All India Ophthalmological Society, the world's second largest ophthalmic professional's organization, in 2014-2016 of young ophthalmologists (those who completed residency between 2005 and 2012) to gauge usefulness of dissertation or thesis during postgraduate residency. RESULTS: There were 1005 respondents, of whom 531 fulfilled inclusion criteria. On a scale of 0-10, residents rated level of supervision of their dissertation as adequate (mean 5.9/10, standard deviation [SD] = 3.1, median = 6). The level of infrastructure available was for dissertation rated as 5.9/10 (median = 7, SD = 3.1), and 6.2/10 was the score that residents said about value added by the dissertation (median = 7). The dissertation was presented at local (33.5%), state (28.1%), national (15.4%), and international (4%) levels. Students, not supervisors, did most of the local and state level presentations. It was published in some forms at local 210 (39.5%), state (140, 26.4%), national (94, 17.7%), and international (39, 7.3%) levels. On a scale of 0-4, seminars (3/4) and case presentations were (3/4) rated higher than didactic lectures (2.2/4), journal clubs (2.2/4), and wet laboratory (1.1/4). CONCLUSION: Peer-reviewed publications from Indian residency training dissertations were few. Residents felt dissertation added value to their training, but there was a huge range among the responses. Journal clubs and wet laboratories were not graded high in academic programs, unlike seminars and case presentations.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  4 / 1109 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27998830
Author:Murphy NA; Wibberley C
Address:School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work and Social Sciences, University of Salford, Salford, UK. Electronic address: n.a.murphy@salford.ac.uk.
Title:Development of an academic identity through PhD supervision-an issue for debate.
Source:Nurse Educ Pract; 22:63-65, 2017 Jan.
ISSN:1873-5223
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:This paper provides reflection on the journey of completing a PhD by using emergent themes that occurred in supervision sessions as recorded in a reflective journal. The paper highlights the need to reflect and accept decisions that can be challenging. The paper also indicates examples where past understandings are questioned and newer insights have to be explored. A conclusion related to accepting responsibility for what happens as a consequence of supervision sessions is debated. Finally a new insight into identity is arrived at.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  5 / 1109 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27885654
Author:Bethard JD
Address:Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL.
Title:Historical Trends in Graduate Research and Training of Diplomates of the American Board of Forensic Anthropology.
Source:J Forensic Sci; 62(1):5-11, 2017 01.
ISSN:1556-4029
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:The history of forensic anthropology has been documented by numerous scholars. These contributions have described the work of early pioneers in the field and have described important milestones, such as the founding of the Physical Anthropology Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) in 1972 and the American Board of Forensic Anthropology (ABFA) in 1977. This paper contributes to the growing literature on the history of forensic anthropology by documenting the academic training of all individuals who have been granted diplomate status by the ABFA (n = 115). Doctoral dissertation titles were queried to discern broad patterns of research foci. A total of 39 doctoral granting institutions have trained diplomates and 77.3% of board-certified forensic anthropologists wrote dissertations involving skeletal biology, bioarchaeology, or forensic anthropology. Board-certified forensic anthropologists are a broadly trained group of professionals with far-reaching anthropological interests and expertise.
Publication type:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE


  6 / 1109 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27667699
Author:Dols JD; Hernández C; Miles H
Address:Ila Faye Miller School of Nursing and Health Professions, University of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio, TX. Electronic address: Dols@uiwtx.edu.
Title:The DNP project: Quandaries for nursing scholars.
Source:Nurs Outlook; 65(1):84-93, 2017 Jan - Feb.
ISSN:1528-3968
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: In the evolving Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) movement, there continues to be a lack of agreement about the final scholarly project. PURPOSE: This study identifies and describes the faculty practices and challenges related to the DNP project across the United States. METHODS: In a descriptive research study, 90 DNP program directors responded to an online survey describing the environment of the DNP program with emphasis on the final scholarly project. DISCUSSION: According to the respondents, 87% of faculty are somewhat or very dissatisfied with the DNP project. Elements that may contribute to the dissatisfaction are the reported lack of faculty knowledge of evidence-based practice and quality improvement, lack of consensus on the DNP project, lack of faculty resources for DNP projects, challenges with clinical sites for the DNP project, and students' scholarly writing skills. CONCLUSION: It is imperative to have academic/practice faculty oriented to DNP concepts; achieve consensus on the project title, type, depth, and outcomes; and have an ongoing dialog regarding DNP project design, execution, and challenges. Project implementation models need to be appropriate for the escalating DNP enrollment. Program support related to institutional review board relationships, student writing and statistical skills, and program-practice site partnerships are needed.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  7 / 1109 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27975353
Author:Evers J; Rausch TK
Title:Lebensdauer promovierter und nicht promovierter Ärzte in Nordrhein. [Lifespan of Doctorate and Non-doctorate Physicians in Northrine].
Source:Dtsch Med Wochenschr; 141(25):e218-e222, 2016 Dec.
ISSN:1439-4413
Country of publication:Germany
Language:ger
Abstract:AIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the lifespan of physicians in North Rhine depending on the criterion if they had graduated with a Dr. med. thesis under German law or not. North Rhine is part of the German federal state North Rhine-Westphalia. METHODS: The date of birth and date of death of 1133 deceased physicians from the journal of the medical association of North Rhine were recorded according to their doctoral degree from January 2013 until June 2016 inclusive. For the calculation of their length of life, the descriptive statistics and for further statistical analysis, the R program 1 was applied. RESULTS: Physicians with a doctoral degree under German law (Dr. med.) reached an average age of 80.9 ± 12.1 years whereas physicians without a dissertation reached an age of 67.6 ± 13.8 years, on average. After correction for year of birth no significant difference between the average lifespan of the two groups could be found. CONCLUSION: The analysis of the survival data of deceased physicians showed a much longer length of life if they had graduated with a doctoral thesis under German law, which was not significant after a year of birth correction. For every statistical analysis possible confounders need to be considered.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  8 / 1109 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27813613
Author:Costa NR; Venancio LP; Bonini-Domingos CR
Address:Centro de Estudos de Quelônios, Departamento de Biologia, Instituto de Biociências, Letras e Ciências Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho", São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brasil.
Title:THESIS ABSTRACT Mechanisms of antioxidant defense in the state of post-hypoxia in Phrynops geoffroanus (Testudines: Chelidae).
Source:Genet Mol Res; 15(4), 2016 Oct 17.
ISSN:1676-5680
Country of publication:Brazil
Language:eng
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Antioxidants); 4Y8F71G49Q (Malondialdehyde)


  9 / 1109 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27742631
Author:Can E; Richter F; Valchanova R; Dewey M
Address:Charité Graduate Programme, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.
Title:Supervisors' perspective on medical thesis projects and dropout rates: survey among thesis supervisors at a large German university hospital.
Source:BMJ Open; 6(10):e012726, 2016 10 14.
ISSN:2044-6055
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To identify underlying causes for failure of medical thesis projects and the constantly high drop-out rate in Germany from the supervisors' perspective and to compare the results with the students' perspective. SETTING: Cross-sectional survey. Online questionnaire for survey of medical thesis supervisors among the staff of Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. Published, earlier longitudinal survey among students for comparison. PARTICIPANTS: 1069 thesis supervisors participated. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Data are presented using descriptive statistics, and the χ test served to compare the results among supervisors with the earlier data from the longitudinal survey of doctoral students. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: Not applicable. This survey is an observational study. RESULTS: Of 3653 potential participants, 1069 (29.3%) supervising 3744 doctoral candidates participated in the study. Supervisors considered themselves to be highly motivated and to offer adequate supervision. On the other hand, 87% stated that they did not feel well prepared for thesis supervision. Supervisors gave lack of timeliness of doctoral students and personal differences (p=0.024 and p=0.001) as the main reasons for terminating thesis projects. Doctoral students predominantly mentioned methodological problems and difficult subjects as critical issues (p=0.001 and p<0.001). Specifically, students felt ill prepared for the statistical part of their research-49.5% stated that they never received statistical assistance, whereas 97% of supervisors claimed to help their students with statistical analysis. CONCLUSIONS: The authors found that both thesis supervisors and medical students feel ill prepared for their roles in the process of a medical dissertation. Contradictory reasons for terminating medical thesis projects based on supervisors' and students' self-assessment suggest a lack of communication and true scientific collaboration between supervisors and doctoral students as the major underlying issue that requires resolution.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T


  10 / 1109 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27657158
Author:Al-Busaidi IS; Alamri Y
Address:Christchurch Public Hospital, Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch.
Title:Publication rates and characteristics of undergraduate medical theses in New Zealand.
Source:N Z Med J; 129(1442):46-51, 2016 Sep 23.
ISSN:1175-8716
Country of publication:New Zealand
Language:eng
Abstract:AIM: Publication in peer-reviewed journals is widely regarded as the preferred vehicle for research dissemination. In New Zealand, the fate and publication rates of theses produced by medical students is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency and characteristics of publications derived from research conducted by Bachelor of Medical Sciences (BMedSc(Hons)) students at the three campuses of the University of Otago Medical School, New Zealand. METHODS: A total of 153 BMedSc(Hons) theses accepted at the Otago Medical School during the period of January 1995 to December 2014 were analysed. Using standardised search criteria, PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched in October 2015 to examine the number and characteristics of publications. RESULTS: Overall, 50 (32.7%) out of 153 included theses resulted in 81 scientific publications. Ten (12.3%) publications featured in Australasian journals. The majority of publications were original articles (84%), with pathology and molecular biology (19%) being the most common research area. Although they did not reach statistical significance, publications in higher impact factor journals trended towards having a senior first author as opposed to a student first author (p=0.06). CONCLUSION: Although higher than reported figures from previous studies, publication rates of BMedSc(Hons) theses remain lower than expected. To improve our understanding of medical student publishing in New Zealand, formal examination of the factors hindering medical students from publishing their theses is imperative.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE



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