Database : MEDLINE
Search on : SP1.001.002.008 [DeCS Category]
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PMID:28456526
Author:Adjagba A; MacDonald NE; Ortega-Pérez I; Duclos P; 2016 Global NITAG Network Meeting Participants
Address:Health Policy and Institutional Development (HPID) Center, Agence de Médecine Préventive, Paris, France.
Title:Strengthening and sustainability of national immunization technical advisory groups (NITAGs) globally: Lessons and recommendations from the founding meeting of the global NITAG network.
Source:Vaccine; 35(23):3007-3011, 2017 05 25.
ISSN:1873-2518
Country of publication:Netherlands
Language:eng
Abstract:National Immunization Technical Advisory Groups (NITAGs) provide independent, evidence-informed advice to assist their governments in immunization policy formation. However, many NITAGs face challenges in fulfilling their roles. Hence the many requests for formation of a network linking NITAGs together so they can learn from each other. To address this request, the Health Policy and Institutional Development (HPID) Center (a WHO Collaborating Center at the Agence de Médecine Préventive - AMP), in collaboration with WHO, organized a meeting in Veyrier-du-Lac, France, on 11 and 12 May 2016, to establish a Global NITAG Network (GNN). The meeting focused on two areas: the requirements for (a) the establishment of a global NITAG collaborative network; and (b) the global assessment/evaluation of the performance of NITAGs. 35 participants from 26 countries reviewed the proposed GNN framework documents and NITAG performance evaluation. Participants recommended that a GNN should be established, agreed on its governance, function, scope and a proposed work plan as well as setting a framework for NITAG evaluation.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Name of substance:0 (Vaccines)


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PMID:29360183
Author:Izumi S; Barfield PA; Basin B; Mood L; Neunzert C; Tadesse R; Bradley KJ; Tanner CA
Address:Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing, Portland, Oregon.
Title:Care coordination: Identifying and connecting the most appropriate care to the patients.
Source:Res Nurs Health; 41(1):49-56, 2018 02.
ISSN:1098-240X
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:Although nurses are increasingly expected to fulfill the role of care coordinator, the knowledge and skills required to be an effective care coordinator are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to describe the knowledge and skills required in care coordination practice using an interpretive phenomenological approach. Fifteen care coordinators from 10 programs were interviewed over a 6-month period. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using interpretive phenomenology. The central theme of care coordination practice was bridging the patient and the healthcare systems. To bridge, care coordinators needed to have knowledge of the patient and healthcare system as well as the skills to identify and negotiate treatments appropriate for the patient. The most salient finding and new to this literature was that care coordinators who used their medical knowledge about available treatment options to discern and negotiate for the most appropriate care to the patient made differences in patient outcomes. Nurses with medical and healthcare system knowledge, combined with the skills to navigate and negotiate with others in an increasingly complex healthcare system, are well situated to be care coordinators and generate optimal outcomes. Further investigations of critical care coordinator competencies are needed to support nurses currently enacting the role of care coordinator and to prepare future nurses to fulfill the role.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


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PMID:28452689
Author:An R; Khan N; Loehmer E; McCaffrey J
Address:Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA.
Title:Assessing the Network of Agencies in Local Communities that Promote Healthy Eating and Lifestyles among Populations with Limited Resources.
Source:Am J Health Behav; 41(2):127-138, 2017 Mar 01.
ISSN:1945-7359
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:OBJECTIVES: We assessed the network of agencies in local communities that promote healthy eating and lifestyles among populations with limited resources. METHODS: Network surveys were administered among 159 Illinois agencies identified as serving limited-resource audiences categorized into 8 types: K-12 schools, early childhood centers, emergency food providers, health-related agencies, social resource centers, low-income/subsidized housing complexes, continuing education organizations, and others. Network analysis was conducted to examine 4 network structures - communications, funding, cooperation, and collaboration networks between agencies within each county/county cluster. RESULTS: Agencies in a network were found to be loosely connected, indicated by low network density. Reporting accuracy might be of concern, indicated by low reciprocity. Agencies in a network are decentralized rather than centralized around a few influential agencies, indicated by low betweenness centrality. There is suggestive evidence regarding homophily in a network, indicated by some significant correlations within agencies of the same type. Agencies connected in one network are significantly more likely to be connected in all the other networks as well. CONCLUSIONS: Promoting healthy eating and lifestyles among populations with limited resources warrants strong partnership across agencies in communities. Network analysis serves as a useful tool to evaluate community partnerships and facilitate coalition building..
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


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PMID:29406638
Author:McGuire M
Title:Is the Key to Successful Teambuilding Puzzling? Exactly!
Source:Pediatr Nurs; 42(5):212, 216, 2016 Sep-Oct.
ISSN:0097-9805
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Publication type:EDITORIAL


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PMID:29461351
Author:Dillon J; Norris Himes J; Reynolds K; Schirm V
Address:Author Affiliations: Community Health Director (Ms Dillon), Senior Vice President and Chief Nurse Officer (Ms Himes), Magnet Program Director (Ms Reynolds), and Director Nursing Research (Dr Schirm), Penn State Health, MS Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania.
Title:An Innovative Partnership to Improve Student Health: Response to a Community Health Needs Assessment.
Source:J Nurs Adm; 48(3):149-153, 2018 Mar.
ISSN:1539-0721
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:This community nursing partnership for student health is a well-recognized innovation, regionally and statewide. The initiative exemplifies 1 department of nursing's commitment to community involvement that originated from the forward thinking of nurse leaders. The journey to engaging intraprofessional partners and firmly establishing the partnership within the community is described.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


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PMID:29389801
Author:Havens DS; Gittell JH; Vasey J
Address:Author Affiliations: Professor (Dr Havens), School of Nursing, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Professor (Dr Gittell), Heller School for Social Policy & Management, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts; Principal (Dr Vasey), Tosti-Vasey & Vasey, Bellefonte, Pennsylvania.
Title:Impact of Relational Coordination on Nurse Job Satisfaction, Work Engagement and Burnout: Achieving the Quadruple Aim.
Source:J Nurs Adm; 48(3):132-140, 2018 Mar.
ISSN:1539-0721
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:AIM: To explore how relational coordination, known to enhance quality and efficiency outcomes for patients and hospitals, impacts direct care nurse outcomes such as burnout, work engagement, and job satisfaction, addressing the "Quadruple Aim," to improve the experience of providing care. BACKGROUND: Hospitals are complex organizations in which multiple providers work interdependently, under conditions of uncertainty and time constraints, to deliver safe quality care despite differences in specialization, training, and status. Relational coordination-communicating and relating for the purpose of task integration-is known to improve quality, safety, and efficiency under these conditions, but less is known about its impact on the well-being of direct care providers themselves. METHODS: Surveys measuring relational coordination among nurses and other types of providers as well as job-related outcomes in 5 acute care community hospitals were completed by direct care RNs. RESULTS: Relational coordination was significantly related to increased job satisfaction, increased work engagement, and reduced burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Relational coordination contributes to the well-being of direct care nurses, addressing the Quadruple Aim by improving the experience of providing care.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


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PMID:29195533
Author:Lewis-Hunstiger M
Title:Global Determinants: Our Human Interconnectedness.
Source:Creat Nurs; 22(4):215-217, 2016 Nov 01.
ISSN:1078-4535
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


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PMID:29280691
Author:; INTEGRATE (The National ENT Trainee Research Network); National ENT Trainee Research Network
Title:The British Rhinological Society multidisciplinary consensus recommendations on the hospital management of epistaxis.
Source:J Laryngol Otol; 131(12):1142-1156, 2017 Dec.
ISSN:1748-5460
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Epistaxis is a common ENT emergency in the UK; however, despite the high incidence, there are currently no nationally accepted guidelines for its management. This paper seeks to recommend evidence-based best practice for the hospital management of epistaxis in adults. METHODS: Recommendations were developed using an Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation ('AGREE II') framework. A multifaceted systematic review of the relevant literature was performed and a multidisciplinary consensus event held. Management recommendations were generated that linked the level of supporting evidence and a Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation ('GRADE') score explaining the strength of recommendation. RECOMMENDATIONS: Despite a paucity of high-level evidence, management recommendations were formed across five management domains (initial assessment, cautery, intranasal agents, haematological factors, and surgery and radiological intervention). CONCLUSION: These consensus recommendations combine a wide-ranging review of the relevant literature with established and rigorous methods of guideline generation. Given the lack of high-level evidence supporting the recommendations, an element of caution should be used when implementing these findings.
Publication type:CONSENSUS DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE; JOURNAL ARTICLE


  9 / 512 MEDLINE  
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PMID:29300753
Author:Liu W; Shi L; Pong RW; Dong H; Mao Y; Tang M; Chen Y
Address:Key Lab of Health Technology Assessment (Ministry of Health), Collaborative Innovation Center of Social Risks Governance in Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
Title:Determinants of knowledge translation from health technology assessment to policy-making in China: From the perspective of researchers.
Source:PLoS One; 13(1):e0190732, 2018.
ISSN:1932-6203
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: For health technology assessment (HTA) to be more policy relevant and for health technology-related decision-making to be truly evidence-based, promoting knowledge translation (KT) is of vital importance. Although some research has focused on KT of HTA, there is a dearth of literature on KT determinants and the situation in developing countries and transitional societies remains largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the determinants of HTA KT from research to health policy-making from the perspective of researchers in China. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: A structured questionnaire which focused on KT was distributed to HTA researchers in China. KT activity levels in various fields of HTA research were compared, using one-way ANOVA. Principal component analysis was performed to provide a basis to combine similar variables. To investigate the determinants of KT level, multiple linear regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: Based on a survey of 382 HTA researchers, it was found that HTA KT wasn't widespread in China. Furthermore, results showed that no significant differences existed between the various HTA research fields. Factors, such as attitudes of researchers toward HTA and evidence utilization, academic ranks and linkages between researchers and policy-makers, had significant impact on HTA KT (p-values<0.05). Additionally, collaboration between HTA researchers and policy-makers, policy-relevance of HTA research, practicality of HTA outcomes and making HTA reports easier to understand also contributed to predicting KT level. However, academic nature of HTA research was negatively associated with KT level. CONCLUSION: KT from HTA to policy-making was influenced by many factors. Of particular importance were collaborations between researchers and policy-makers, ensuring policy relevance of HTA and making HTA evidence easier to understand by potential users.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T


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PMID:29199260
Author:Ikeda K; Kasuga M; Hosoi T; Yoshii M; Sugiyama M; Wako A; Ozawa K
Address:Department of Pharmacotherapy, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University.
Title:[Implementation and Evaluation of Genetic Testing Seminars about Lifestyle-related Disease Prevention in Pharmacy Insurance-The Need for Cooperation between the Pharmacy and the University in Genetic Testing].
Source:Yakugaku Zasshi; 137(12):1517-1531, 2017.
ISSN:1347-5231
Country of publication:Japan
Language:jpn
Abstract:A seminar titled "Implementation and evaluation of genetic testing of lifestyle-related disease genes" was held for pharmacists, medical clerks, and clerks of pharmacy insurance, with the aim of holding seminars led by pharmacists for the general public (including patients) in the future. The subject of the seminar was single nucleotide polymorphisms in obesity-related genes and alcohol metabolism-related genes. The purpose of the seminar was to contribute to the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases of the general public. We evaluated it by administering a questionnaire to the participants before and after the seminar. After the seminar, 55% of pharmacists answered that they would like to or would strongly like to participate in genetic testing (for lifestyle-related diseases and drug metabolism-related genes) of the general public. However, some participants did not wish to do so. A customer satisfaction (CS) analysis found that this was mainly because they did not want to know the results of genetic testing of others, which they felt should be private. Most (82%) of the pharmacists answered that assistance and advice was "very necessary" or "necessary" in the participation of genetic testing. These findings show that collaboration between pharmacies and universities will be important for future seminars to the general public.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:EC 1.1.1.1 (Alcohol Dehydrogenase)



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