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Pesquisa : A08.612 [Categoria DeCS]
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[PMID]:28469563
[Au] Autor:Kerr MSD; Sacré P; Kahn K; Park HJ; Johnson M; Lee J; Thompson S; Bulacio J; Jones J; González-Martínez J; Liégeois-Chauvel C; Sarma SV; Gale JT
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimore, MD, USA.
[Ti] Título:The Role of Associative Cortices and Hippocampus during Movement Perturbations.
[So] Source:Front Neural Circuits;11:26, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1662-5110
[Cp] País de publicação:Switzerland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Although motor control has been extensively studied, most research involving neural recordings has focused on primary motor cortex, pre-motor cortex, supplementary motor area, and cerebellum. These regions are involved during normal movements, however, associative cortices and hippocampus are also likely involved during perturbed movements as one must detect the unexpected disturbance, inhibit the previous motor plan, and create a new plan to compensate. Minimal data is available on these brain regions during such "robust" movements. Here, epileptic patients implanted with intracerebral electrodes performed reaching movements while experiencing occasional unexpected force perturbations allowing study of the fronto-parietal, limbic and hippocampal network at unprecedented high spatial, and temporal scales. Areas including orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and hippocampus showed increased activation during perturbed trials. These results, coupled with a visual novelty control task, suggest the hippocampal MTL-P300 novelty response is modality independent, and that the OFC is involved in modifying motor plans during robust movement.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Mapeamento Encefálico
Córtex Cerebral/fisiopatologia
Potenciais Evocados Visuais/fisiologia
Hipocampo/fisiopatologia
Transtornos dos Movimentos/patologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Eletroencefalografia
Epilepsia/complicações
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Imagem por Ressonância Magnética
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Transtornos dos Movimentos/etiologia
Vias Neurais/fisiopatologia
Testes Neuropsicológicos
Estimulação Luminosa
Fatores de Tempo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180307
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180307
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3389/fncir.2017.00026


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[PMID]:29335427
[Au] Autor:Renteria R; Baltz ET; Gremel CM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.
[Ti] Título:Chronic alcohol exposure disrupts top-down control over basal ganglia action selection to produce habits.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):211, 2018 01 15.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Addiction involves a predominance of habitual control mediated through action selection processes in dorsal striatum. Research has largely focused on neural mechanisms mediating a proposed progression from ventral to dorsal lateral striatal control in addiction. However, over reliance on habit striatal processes may also arise from reduced cortical input to striatum, thereby disrupting executive control over action selection. Here, we identify novel mechanisms through which chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and withdrawal (CIE) disrupts top-down control over goal-directed action selection processes to produce habits. We find CIE results in decreased excitability of orbital frontal cortex (OFC) excitatory circuits supporting goal-directed control, and, strikingly, selectively reduces OFC output to the direct output pathway in dorsal medial striatum. Increasing the activity of OFC circuits restores goal-directed control in CIE-exposed mice. Our findings show habitual control in alcohol dependence can arise through disrupted communication between top-down, goal-directed processes onto basal ganglia pathways controlling action selection.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Gânglios da Base/efeitos dos fármacos
Etanol/farmacologia
Hábitos
Rede Nervosa/efeitos dos fármacos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Gânglios da Base/metabolismo
Gânglios da Base/fisiologia
Encéfalo/citologia
Encéfalo/efeitos dos fármacos
Encéfalo/fisiologia
Depressores do Sistema Nervoso Central/farmacologia
Condicionamento Operante/efeitos dos fármacos
Condicionamento Operante/fisiologia
Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL
Camundongos Transgênicos
Rede Nervosa/fisiologia
Vias Neurais/efeitos dos fármacos
Vias Neurais/fisiologia
Neurônios/efeitos dos fármacos
Neurônios/fisiologia
Técnicas de Patch-Clamp
Transmissão Sináptica/efeitos dos fármacos
Transmissão Sináptica/genética
Transmissão Sináptica/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Central Nervous System Depressants); 3K9958V90M (Ethanol)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180117
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-02615-9


  3 / 43140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29480825
[Au] Autor:Jang SH; Jang WH
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daemyungdong, Namku, Daegu.
[Ti] Título:The allocentric neglect due to injury of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus in a stroke patient: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(2):e9295, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:RATIONALE: We report on a patient who developed allocentric neglect due to injury of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) following intracranial hemorrhage, diagnosed using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). PATIENT CONCERNS: Her cognition seemed normal (A 17-year-old, right-handed female patient). However, in spite of a normal visual field, her perception was missing on the left side, and she had no awareness of her deficit. She was unable to perceive the left side in each of 2 objects, regardless of position of the 2 objects, and failed at detail exploration of the left side of 1 object. In addition, the line bisection test, the most representative neglect test, did not reveal any abnormality. DIAGNOSES: She was diagnosed with an intracerebral hemorrhage (right thalamus), intraventricular hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage due to arteriovenous malformation in the right thalamus. INTERVENTIONS: Seven weeks after onset, she began rehabilitation. Consequently, the apple cancellation test to discriminate between allocentric and egocentric neglect was performed, with the result of severe allocentric neglect. OUTCOMES: The right superior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior longitudinal fasciculus were well-reconstructed without definite injury compared with those of the left side. However, the right IFOF was discontinued in the anterior portion around the frontal lobe. LESSONS: Allocentric neglect due to injury of IFOF was demonstrated in a stroke patient using DTT. It appears that DTT would be helpful in demonstrating the neglect type and pathway in patients with neglect.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Encéfalo/diagnóstico por imagem
Hemorragia Cerebral/complicações
Malformações Arteriovenosas Intracranianas/complicações
Transtornos da Percepção/etiologia
Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações
Hemorragia Subaracnóidea/complicações
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Encéfalo/fisiopatologia
Hemorragia Cerebral/diagnóstico por imagem
Hemorragia Cerebral/fisiopatologia
Imagem de Tensor de Difusão
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Malformações Arteriovenosas Intracranianas/diagnóstico por imagem
Malformações Arteriovenosas Intracranianas/fisiopatologia
Vias Neurais/lesões
Vias Neurais/fisiopatologia
Transtornos da Percepção/diagnóstico por imagem
Transtornos da Percepção/fisiopatologia
Transtornos da Percepção/reabilitação
Acidente Vascular Cerebral/diagnóstico por imagem
Acidente Vascular Cerebral/fisiopatologia
Hemorragia Subaracnóidea/diagnóstico por imagem
Hemorragia Subaracnóidea/fisiopatologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180227
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009295


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[PMID]:28743727
[Au] Autor:Lichtenberg NT; Pennington ZT; Holley SM; Greenfield VY; Cepeda C; Levine MS; Wassum KM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology and.
[Ti] Título:Basolateral Amygdala to Orbitofrontal Cortex Projections Enable Cue-Triggered Reward Expectations.
[So] Source:J Neurosci;37(35):8374-8384, 2017 Aug 30.
[Is] ISSN:1529-2401
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:To make an appropriate decision, one must anticipate potential future rewarding events, even when they are not readily observable. These expectations are generated by using observable information (e.g., stimuli or available actions) to retrieve often quite detailed memories of available rewards. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) are two reciprocally connected key nodes in the circuitry supporting such outcome-guided behaviors. But there is much unknown about the contribution of this circuit to decision making, and almost nothing known about the whether any contribution is via direct, monosynaptic projections, or the direction of information transfer. Therefore, here we used designer receptor-mediated inactivation of OFC→BLA or BLA→OFC projections to evaluate their respective contributions to outcome-guided behaviors in rats. Inactivation of BLA terminals in the OFC, but not OFC terminals in the BLA, disrupted the selective motivating influence of cue-triggered reward representations over reward-seeking decisions as assayed by Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer. BLA→OFC projections were also required when a cued reward representation was used to modify Pavlovian conditional goal-approach responses according to the reward's current value. These projections were not necessary when actions were guided by reward expectations generated based on learned action-reward contingencies, or when rewards themselves, rather than stored memories, directed action. These data demonstrate that BLA→OFC projections enable the cue-triggered reward expectations that can motivate the execution of specific action plans and allow adaptive conditional responding. Deficits anticipating potential future rewarding events are associated with many psychiatric diseases. Presently, we know little about the neural circuits supporting such reward expectation. Here we show that basolateral amygdala to orbitofrontal cortex projections are required for expectations of specific available rewards to influence reward seeking and decision making. The necessity of these projections was limited to situations in which expectations were elicited by reward-predictive cues. These projections therefore facilitate adaptive behavior by enabling the orbitofrontal cortex to use environmental stimuli to generate expectations of potential future rewarding events.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Antecipação Psicológica/fisiologia
Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala/fisiologia
Tomada de Decisões/fisiologia
Extinção Psicológica/fisiologia
Motivação/fisiologia
Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia
Recompensa
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Condicionamento Operante/fisiologia
Sinais (Psicologia)
Masculino
Vias Neurais/fisiologia
Ratos
Ratos Long-Evans
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170727
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0486-17.2017


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[PMID]:29374173
[Au] Autor:Shin JH; Kim D; Jung MW
[Ad] Endereço:Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 34141, Korea.
[Ti] Título:Differential coding of reward and movement information in the dorsomedial striatal direct and indirect pathways.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):404, 2018 01 26.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The direct and indirect pathways of the basal ganglia have long been thought to mediate behavioral promotion and inhibition, respectively. However, this classic dichotomous model has been recently challenged. To better understand neural processes underlying reward-based learning and movement control, we recorded from direct (dSPNs) and indirect (iSPNs) pathway spiny projection neurons in the dorsomedial striatum of D1-Cre and D2-Cre mice performing a probabilistic Pavlovian conditioning task. dSPNs tend to increase activity while iSPNs decrease activity as a function of reward value, suggesting the striatum represents value in the relative activity levels of dSPNs versus iSPNs. Lick offset-related activity increase is largely dSPN selective, suggesting dSPN involvement in suppressing ongoing licking behavior. Rapid responses to negative outcome and previous reward-related responses are more frequent among iSPNs than dSPNs, suggesting stronger contributions of iSPNs to outcome-dependent behavioral adjustment. These findings provide new insights into striatal neural circuit operations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Condicionamento (Psicologia)/fisiologia
Corpo Estriado/fisiologia
Vias Neurais/fisiologia
Neurônios/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Corpo Estriado/citologia
Sinais (Psicologia)
Eletrodos Implantados
Masculino
Camundongos
Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL
Camundongos Transgênicos
Monoterpenos
Movimento
Odorantes/análise
Percepção Olfatória/fisiologia
Optogenética
Pentanóis
Receptores de Dopamina D1/fisiologia
Receptores de Dopamina D2/fisiologia
Recompensa
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Monoterpenes); 0 (Pentanols); 0 (Receptors, Dopamine D1); 0 (Receptors, Dopamine D2); 75GK9XIA8I (carvone); T7EU0O9VPP (citral); Z135787824 (isoamyl acetate)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180128
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-02817-1


  6 / 43140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28451637
[Au] Autor:Sun Y; Grieco SF; Holmes TC; Xu X
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-1275.
[Ti] Título:Local and Long-Range Circuit Connections to Hilar Mossy Cells in the Dentate Gyrus.
[So] Source:eNeuro;4(2), 2017 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:2373-2822
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Hilar mossy cells are the prominent glutamatergic cell type in the dentate hilus of the dentate gyrus (DG); they have been proposed to have critical roles in the DG network. To better understand how mossy cells contribute to DG function, we have applied new viral genetic and functional circuit mapping approaches to quantitatively map and compare local and long-range circuit connections of mossy cells and dentate granule cells in the mouse. The great majority of inputs to mossy cells consist of two parallel inputs from within the DG: an excitatory input pathway from dentate granule cells and an inhibitory input pathway from local DG inhibitory neurons. Mossy cells also receive a moderate degree of excitatory and inhibitory CA3 input from proximal CA3 subfields. Long range inputs to mossy cells are numerically sparse, and they are only identified readily from the medial septum and the septofimbrial nucleus. In comparison, dentate granule cells receive most of their inputs from the entorhinal cortex. The granule cells receive significant synaptic inputs from the hilus and the medial septum, and they also receive direct inputs from both distal and proximal CA3 subfields, which has been underdescribed in the existing literature. Our slice-based physiological mapping studies further supported the identified circuit connections of mossy cells and granule cells. Together, our data suggest that hilar mossy cells are major local circuit integrators and they exert modulation of the activity of dentate granule cells as well as the CA3 region through "back-projection" pathways.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Hipocampo/citologia
Fibras Musgosas Hipocampais/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Potenciais de Ação
Animais
Neurônios Colinérgicos/citologia
Feminino
Neurônios GABAérgicos/citologia
Hipocampo/fisiologia
Masculino
Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL
Fibras Musgosas Hipocampais/fisiologia
Inibição Neural
Vias Neurais/citologia
Vias Neurais/fisiologia
Técnicas de Rastreamento Neuroanatômico
Núcleos Septais/citologia
Sinapses
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180228
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180228
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 43140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27771348
[Au] Autor:Rueda-Delgado LM; Solesio-Jofre E; Mantini D; Dupont P; Daffertshofer A; Swinnen SP
[Ad] Endereço:KU Leuven, Movement Control and Neuroplasticity Research Group, Group Biomedical Sciences, Tervuurse Vest 101, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: Laura.RuedaDelgado@kuleuven.be.
[Ti] Título:Coordinative task difficulty and behavioural errors are associated with increased long-range beta band synchronization.
[So] Source:Neuroimage;146:883-893, 2017 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9572
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The neural network and the task-dependence of (local) activity changes involved in bimanual coordination are well documented. However, much less is known about the functional connectivity within this neural network and its modulation according to manipulations of task complexity. Here, we assessed neural activity via high-density electroencephalography, focussing on changes of activity in the beta frequency band (~15-30Hz) across the motor network in 26 young adult participants (19-29 years old). We investigated how network connectivity was modulated with task difficulty and errors of performance during a bimanual visuomotor movement consisting of dial rotation according to three different ratios of speed: an isofrequency movement (1:1), a non-isofrequency movement with the right hand keeping the fast pace (1:3), and the converse ratio with the left hand keeping the fast pace (3:1). To quantify functional coupling, we determined neural synchronization which might be key for the timing of the activity within brain regions during task execution. Individual source activity with realistic head models was reconstructed at seven regions of interest including frontal and parietal areas, among which we estimated phase-based connectivity. Partial least squares analysis revealed a significant modulation of connectivity with task difficulty, and significant correlations between connectivity and errors in performance, in particular between sensorimotor cortices. Our findings suggest that modulation of long-range synchronization is instrumental for coping with increasing task demands in bimanual coordination.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ritmo beta
Sincronização Cortical
Córtex Motor/fisiologia
Desempenho Psicomotor
Córtex Sensório-Motor/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Mapeamento Encefálico
Eletroencefalografia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Vias Neurais/fisiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 43140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27774721
[Au] Autor:Puetz VB; Parker D; Kohn N; Dahmen B; Verma R; Konrad K
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:Altered brain network integrity after childhood maltreatment: A structural connectomic DTI-study.
[So] Source:Hum Brain Mapp;38(2):855-868, 2017 02.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0193
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Childhood maltreatment is associated with alterations in neural architecture that potentially put these children at increased risk for psychopathology. Alterations in white matter (WM) tracts have been reported, however no study to date has investigated WM connectivity in brain networks in maltreated children to quantify global and local abnormalities through graph theoretical analyses of DTI data. We aimed for a multilevel investigation examining the DTI-based structural connectome and its associations with basal cortisol levels of 25 children with documented maltreatment experiences before age 3, and 24 matched controls (age: 10.6 ± 1.75 years). On the global and lobar level, maltreated children showed significant reductions in global connectivity strength, local connectivity and increased path length, suggesting deviations from the small-world network architecture previously associated with psychopathology. Reductions in global connectivity were associated with placement instability, attenuated cortisol secretion and higher levels of internalizing and externalizing behaviours. Regional measures revealed lower connectivity strength especially in regions within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vMPFC) in maltreated children. These findings show that childhood maltreatment is associated with systemic global neurodevelopmental alterations in WM networks next to regional alterations in areas involved in the regulation of affect. These alterations in WM organization could underlie global functional deficits and multi-symptom patterns frequently observed in children with maltreatment experiences. Hum Brain Mapp 38:855-868, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Encéfalo/diagnóstico por imagem
Maus-Tratos Infantis
Imagem de Tensor de Difusão
Transtornos Mentais/diagnóstico por imagem
Vias Neurais/diagnóstico por imagem
Substância Branca/diagnóstico por imagem
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Mapeamento Encefálico
Criança
Maus-Tratos Infantis/psicologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Processamento de Imagem Assistida por Computador
Imagem por Ressonância Magnética
Masculino
Transtornos Mentais/etiologia
Modelos Neurológicos
Fibras Nervosas Mielinizadas/fisiologia
Escalas de Graduação Psiquiátrica
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180217
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180217
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/hbm.23423


  9 / 43140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29390458
[Au] Autor:Jang SH; Ha JW; Kim HY; Seo YS
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University.
[Ti] Título:Recovery of injured Broca's portion of arcuate fasciculus in the dominant hemisphere in a patient with traumatic brain injury.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(51):e9183, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:RATIONALE: Recovery of injured AF in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) has not been reported. In this study, we report on a patient with TBI who recovered from an injury to Broca's portion of AF in the dominant hemisphere, diagnosed by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). PATIENT CONCERNS: A 28-year-old right-handed male patient suffered head trauma resulting from sliding while riding a motorcycle. DIAGNOSES: He was diagnosed with a traumatic contusional hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and subdural hemorrhage in the left fronto-temporal lobe. INTERVENTIONS: He underwent craniectomy on the left fronto-temporal area, and hematoma removal for the subdural hemorrhage in the neurosurgery department of a university hospital. Two weeks after the injury, he was transferred to the rehabilitation department of another university hospital. He showed severe aphasia and brain MRI showed leukomalactic lesion in the left frontal lobe. OUTCOMES: The result WAB for the patient showed severe aphasia, with an aphasia quotient of 45.3 percentile. However, his aphasia improved rapidly by 9 months with an aphasia quotient at the 100.0 percentile. 2-week DTT detected discontinuity in the subcortical white matter at the branch to Broca's area of left AF. By contrast, on 9-month DTT, the discontinued portion of left AF was elongated to the left Broca's area. LESSONS: Recovery of injured Broca's portion of AF in the dominant hemisphere along with excellent improvement of aphasia was demonstrated in a patient with TBI. This study has important implications in brain rehabilitation because the mechanism of recovery from aphasia following TBI has not been elucidated.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Afasia de Broca/fisiopatologia
Núcleo Arqueado do Hipotálamo/fisiopatologia
Lesões Encefálicas Traumáticas/diagnóstico
Lesões Encefálicas Traumáticas/reabilitação
Vias Neurais/lesões
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Afasia de Broca/etiologia
Lesões Encefálicas Traumáticas/cirurgia
Área de Broca/lesões
Craniotomia/métodos
Imagem de Tensor de Difusão/métodos
Seguimentos
Lobo Frontal/lesões
Lobo Frontal/patologia
Lateralidade Funcional
Hematoma Subdural/diagnóstico
Hematoma Subdural/reabilitação
Hematoma Subdural/cirurgia
Seres Humanos
Escala de Gravidade do Ferimento
Imagem por Ressonância Magnética/métodos
Masculino
Recuperação de Função Fisiológica
Medição de Risco
Lobo Temporal/lesões
Lobo Temporal/patologia
Resultado do Tratamento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180214
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180214
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009183


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[PMID]:27774695
[Au] Autor:Bellana B; Liu ZX; Diamond NB; Grady CL; Moscovitch M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
[Ti] Título:Similarities and differences in the default mode network across rest, retrieval, and future imagining.
[So] Source:Hum Brain Mapp;38(3):1155-1171, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0193
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The default mode network (DMN) has been identified reliably during rest, as well as during the performance of tasks such as episodic retrieval and future imagining. It remains unclear why this network is engaged across these seemingly distinct conditions, though many hypotheses have been proposed to account for these effects. Prior to generating hypotheses explaining common DMN involvement, the degree of commonality in the DMN across these conditions, within individuals, must be statistically determined to test whether or not the DMN is truly a unitary network, equally engaged across rest, retrieval and future imagining. To provide such a test, we used comparable paradigms (self-directed, uninterrupted thought of equal duration) across the three conditions (rest, retrieval, and future imagining) in a within-participant design. We found lower than expected pattern similarity in DMN functional connectivity across the three conditions. Similarity in connectivity accounted for only 40-50% of the total variance. Partial Least Squares (PLS) analyses revealed the medial temporal regions of the DMN were preferentially coupled with one another during episodic retrieval and future imagining, whereas the non-medial temporal regions of the DMN (e.g., medial prefrontal cortex, lateral temporal cortex, and temporal pole) were preferentially coupled during rest. These results suggest that DMN connectivity may be more flexible than previously considered. Our findings are in line with emerging evidence that the DMN is not a static network engaged commonly across distinct cognitive processes, but is instead a dynamic system, topographically changing in relation to ongoing cognitive demands. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1155-1171, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Encéfalo/diagnóstico por imagem
Processamento de Imagem Assistida por Computador
Imagem por Ressonância Magnética/métodos
Modelos Neurológicos
Vias Neurais/diagnóstico por imagem
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Análise de Variância
Mapeamento Encefálico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Vias Neurais/fisiologia
Descanso
Pensamento/fisiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180213
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180213
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/hbm.23445



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