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Antunes, José Leopoldo Ferreira
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[PMID]:29364943
[Au] Autor:Singh A; Harford J; Antunes JLF; Peres MA
[Ad] Endereço:Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health (ARCPOH), Adelaide Dental School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.
[Ti] Título:Area-level income inequality and oral health among Australian adults-A population-based multilevel study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191438, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: A lack of evidence exists on the association between area-level income inequality and oral health within Australia. This study examined associations between area-level income inequality and oral health outcomes (inadequate dentition (<21 teeth) and poor self-rated oral health) among Australian adults. Variations in the association between area-level income inequality and oral health outcomes according to area-level mean income were also assessed. Finally, household-income gradients in oral health outcomes according to area-level income inequality were compared. METHODS: For the analyses, data on Australian dentate adults (n = 5,165 nested in 435 Local Government Areas (LGAs)) was obtained from the National Dental Telephone Interview Survey-2013. Multilevel multivariable logistic regression models with random intercept and fixed slopes were fitted to test associations between area-level income inequality and oral health outcomes, examine variations in associations according to area-level mean income, and examine variations in household-income gradients in outcomes according to area-level income inequality. Covariates included age, sex, LGA-level mean weekly household income, geographic remoteness and household income. RESULTS: LGA-level income inequality was not associated with poor self-rated oral health and inversely associated with inadequate dentition (OR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.87) after adjusting for covariates. Inverse association between income inequality and inadequate dentition at the individual level was limited to LGAs within the highest tertile of mean weekly household income. Household income gradients in both outcomes showed poorer oral health at lower levels of household income. The household income gradients for inadequate dentition varied according to the LGA-level income inequality. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that income inequality at the LGA-level in Australia is not positively associated with poorer oral health outcomes. Inverse association between income inequality and inadequate dentition is likely due to the contextual differences between Australia and other high-income countries.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Saúde Bucal
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Austrália
Inquéritos de Saúde Bucal
Dentição Permanente
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Renda
Modelos Logísticos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Autorrelato
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191438


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[PMID]:29178643
[Au] Autor:Yuan Q; Zhao M; Tandon B; Maili L; Liu X; Zhang A; Baugh EH; Tran T; Silva RM; Hecht JT; Swindell EC; Wagner DS; Letra A
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, Houston, Texas.
[Ti] Título:Role of WNT10A in failure of tooth development in humans and zebrafish.
[So] Source:Mol Genet Genomic Med;5(6):730-741, 2017 11.
[Is] ISSN:2324-9269
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Oligodontia is a severe form of tooth agenesis characterized by the absence of six or more permanent teeth. Oligodontia has complex etiology and variations in numerous genes have been suggested as causal for the condition. METHODS: We applied whole-exome sequencing (WES) to identify the cause of oligodontia in a 9-year-old girl missing 11 permanent teeth. Protein modeling and functional analysis in zebrafish were also performed to understand the impact of identified variants on the phenotype. RESULTS: We identified a novel compound heterozygous missense mutation in WNT10A (c.637G>A:p.Gly213Ser and c.1070C>T:p.Thr357Ile) as the likely cause of autosomal recessive oligodontia in the child. Affected residues are located in conserved regions and variants are predicted to be highly deleterious for potentially destabilizing the protein fold and inhibiting normal protein function. Functional studies in zebrafish embryos showed that wnt10a is expressed in the craniofacies at critical time points for tooth development, and that perturbations of wnt10a expression impaired normal tooth development and arrested tooth development at 5 days postfertilization (dpf). Furthermore, mRNA expression levels of additional tooth development genes were directly correlated with wnt10a expression; expression of msx1, dlx2b, eda, and axin2 was decreased upon wnt10a knockdown, and increased upon wnt10a overexpression. CONCLUSIONS: Our results reveal a novel compound heterozygous variant in WNT10A as pathogenic for oligodontia, and demonstrate that perturbations of wnt10a expression in zebrafish may directly and/or indirectly affect tooth development recapitulating the agenesis phenotype observed in humans.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Anodontia/genética
Dente/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Proteínas Wnt/genética
Proteínas de Peixe-Zebra/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Sequência de Aminoácidos
Animais
Animais Geneticamente Modificados/genética
Anodontia/diagnóstico
Sequência de Bases
Criança
Dentição Permanente
Embrião não Mamífero/metabolismo
Feminino
Heterozigoto
Seres Humanos
Modelos Animais
Morfolinos/genética
Morfolinos/metabolismo
Fenótipo
Estrutura Terciária de Proteína
Dente/patologia
Sequenciamento Completo do Exoma
Proteínas Wnt/química
Proteínas Wnt/metabolismo
Peixe-Zebra/genética
Proteínas de Peixe-Zebra/antagonistas & inibidores
Proteínas de Peixe-Zebra/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Morpholinos); 0 (WNT10A protein, human); 0 (Wnt Proteins); 0 (Zebrafish Proteins)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180207
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180207
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/mgg3.332


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[PMID]:29284075
[Au] Autor:Dorri M; Martinez-Zapata MJ; Walsh T; Marinho VC; Sheiham Deceased A; Zaror C
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Restorative Dentistry, Bristol Oral and Dental School, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol, UK, BS1 2LY.
[Ti] Título:Atraumatic restorative treatment versus conventional restorative treatment for managing dental caries.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;12:CD008072, 2017 12 28.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Dental caries is a sugar-dependent disease that damages tooth structure and, due to loss of mineral components, may eventually lead to cavitation. Dental caries is the most prevalent disease worldwide and is considered the most important burden of oral health. Conventional treatment methods (drill and fill) involve the use of rotary burs under local anaesthesia. The need for an electricity supply, expensive handpieces and highly trained dental health personnel may limit access to dental treatment, especially in underdeveloped regions.To overcome the limitations of conventional restorative treatment, the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) was developed, mainly for treating caries in children living in under-served areas of the world where resources and facilities such as electricity and trained manpower are limited. ART is a minimally invasive approach which involves removal of decayed tissue using hand instruments alone, usually without use of anaesthesia and electrically driven equipment, and restoration of the dental cavity with an adhesive material (glass ionomer cement (GIC), composite resins, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RM-GICs) and compomers). OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) compared with conventional treatment for managing dental caries lesions in the primary and permanent teeth of children and adults. SEARCH METHODS: Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 22 February 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 1), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 22 February 2017), Embase Ovid (1980 to 22 February 2017), LILACS BIREME Virtual Health Library (Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information database; 1982 to 22 February 2017) and BBO BIREME Virtual Health Library (Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia; 1986 to 22 February 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with at least six months' follow-up that compared the effects of ART with a conventional restorative approach using the same or different restorative dental materials to treat caries lesions. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened search results, extracted data from included studies and assessed the risk of bias in those studies. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane to evaluate risk of bias and synthesise data. Where pooling was appropriate we conducted meta-analyses using the random-effects model. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE criteria. MAIN RESULTS: We included a total of 15 eligible studies randomising 3760 participants in this review. The age of participants across the studies ranged from 3 to 101 years, with a mean of 25.42 years. 48% of participants were male. All included studies were published between 2002 and 2016. Two of the 15 studies declared that the financial support was from companies that manufacture restorative material. Five studies were individually randomised parallel-group studies; six were cluster-randomised parallel-group studies; and four were randomised studies that used a split-mouth design. Eleven studies evaluated the effects of ART on primary teeth only, and four on permanent teeth. The follow-up period of the included studies ranged from 6 months to 36 months. We judged all studies to be at high risk of bias.For the main comparison of ART compared to conventional treatment using the same material: all but two studies used high-viscosity glass ionomer (H-GIC) as the restorative material; one study used a composite material; and one study used resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC)).Compared to conventional treatment using H-GIC, ART may increase the risk of restoration failure in the primary dentition, over a follow-up period from 12 to 24 months (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.27, five studies; 643 participants analysed; low-quality evidence). Our confidence in this effect estimate is limited due to serious concerns over risk of performance and attrition bias. For this comparison, ART may reduce pain during procedure compared with conventional treatment (MD -0.65, 95% CI -1.38 to 0.07; 40 participants analysed; low-quality evidence)Comparisons of ART to conventional treatment using composite or RM-GIC were downgraded to very low quality due to indirectness, imprecision and high risk of performance and attrition bias. Given the very low quality of the evidence from single studies, we are uncertain about the restoration failure of ART compared with conventional treatment using composite over a 24-month follow-up period (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.54 to 2.29; one study; 57 participants) and ART using RM-GIC in the permanent teeth of older adults with root caries lesions over a six-month follow-up period (OR 2.71, 95% CI 0.94 to 7.81; one study; 64 participants).No studies reported on adverse events or costs. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Low-quality evidence suggests that ART using H-GIC may have a higher risk of restoration failure than conventional treatment for caries lesions in primary teeth. The effects of ART using composite and RM-GIC are uncertain due to the very low quality of the evidence and we cannot rely on the findings. Most studies evaluated the effects of ART on the primary dentition.Well-designed RCTs are required that report on restoration failure at clinically meaningful time points, as well as participant-reported outcomes such as pain and discomfort. Due to the potential confounding effects from the use of different dental materials, a robust body of evidence on the effects of ART compared with conventional treatment using the same restoration material is necessary. We identified four ongoing trials that could provide further insights into this area.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Tratamento Dentário Restaurador sem Trauma
Cárie Dentária/terapia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Criança
Falha de Restauração Dentária/estatística & dados numéricos
Dentição Permanente
Feminino
Cimentos de Ionômeros de Vidro/uso terapêutico
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
Dente Decíduo
Odontalgia/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Glass Ionomer Cements)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180123
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180123
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171229
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD008072.pub2


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[PMID]:28832922
[Au] Autor:Stojanowski CM; Paul KS; Seidel AC; Duncan WN; Guatelli-Steinberg D
[Ad] Endereço:Center for Bioarchaeological Research, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, 85287.
[Ti] Título:Heritability and genetic integration of tooth size in the South Carolina Gullah.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;164(3):505-521, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: This article provides estimates of narrow-sense heritability and genetic pleiotropy for mesiodistal tooth dimensions for a sample of 20th century African American individuals. Results inform biological distance analysis and offer insights into patterns of integration in the human dentition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Maximum mesiodistal crown dimensions were measured using Hillson-FitzGerald calipers on 469 stone dental casts from the Menegaz-Bock Collection. Narrow-sense heritability estimates and genetic and phenotypic correlations were estimated using SOLAR 8.1.1 with covariate screening for age, sex, age*sex interaction, and birth year. RESULTS: Heritability estimates were moderate (∼0.10 - 0.90; h mean = 0.51) for most measured variables with sex as the only significant covariate. Patterns of genetic correlation indicate strong integration across tooth classes, except molars. Comparison of these results to previously published work suggests lower overall heritability relative to other human populations and much stronger genetic integration across tooth classes than obtained from nonhuman primate genetic pleiotropy estimates. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the high heritabilities previously published may reflect overestimates inherent in previous study designs; as such the standard estimate of 0.55 used in biodistance analyses may not be appropriate. For the Gullah, isolation and endogamy coupled with elevated levels of physiological and economic stress may suppress narrow-sense heritability estimates. Pleiotropy analyses suggest a more highly integrated dentition in humans than in other mammals.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Afroamericanos/genética
Grupos Étnicos/genética
Tamanho do Órgão/genética
Característica Quantitativa Herdável
Dente/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Antropologia Física
Dentição Permanente
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Odontometria
South Carolina
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171030
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171030
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170824
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23290


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[PMID]:28765461
[Au] Autor:Rozier RG; White BA; Slade GD
[Ad] Endereço:Dr. Rozier is with the Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Dr. White is with the Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, and Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and Dr. Slade is with the Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. gary_rozier@unc.edu.
[Ti] Título:Trends in Oral Diseases in the U.S. Population.
[So] Source:J Dent Educ;81(8):eS97-eS109, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1930-7837
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This article reviews trends in dental caries, periodontal disease, and tooth loss for the United States along with population dynamics and risk factors that might influence these trends going forward. Dental caries experience remains high in the primary dentition. Caries severity in permanent teeth of children has declined to historically low levels, and long-standing inequalities in untreated caries appear to be narrowing. Declines in caries severity of children's permanent teeth have stabilized at a low level, but likely will contribute to future reductions in dental caries severity in adults. The prevalence of periodontal disease is high in adults, and only a small percentage have severe forms of the disease. Countervailing trends in determinants would suggest little change in the prevalence of periodontal disease in the future, but the lack of an obvious trend over the last two decades makes projections uncertain. Tooth loss as a consequence of dental disease has declined markedly over the last half century and has been all but eliminated in high-income groups. However, notable exceptions to these favorable trends are evident. Progress in prevention policies and programs that affect disease experience appears slower than progress in meeting population-level caries treatment needs. Clearly, long-standing inequities related to political and social determinants remain for all dental diseases, and income disparities in dental disease are widening for some indicators. Growing inequalities raise ethical and public health concerns that should be prominent in discussions of dental workforce needs and strategies for the next 25 years. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 Century."
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cárie Dentária/epidemiologia
Doenças Periodontais/epidemiologia
Perda de Dente/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Criança
Inquéritos de Saúde Bucal
Dentição Permanente
Seres Humanos
Saúde Bucal/tendências
Prevalência
Fatores de Risco
Dente Decíduo
Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170906
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170906
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:D; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170803
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.21815/JDE.017.016


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[PMID]:28759120
[Au] Autor:Ahovuo-Saloranta A; Forss H; Walsh T; Nordblad A; Mäkelä M; Worthington HV
[Ad] Endereço:School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Voimakatu 4 A 12 (home), Tampere, Finland, FI-33100.
[Ti] Título:Pit and fissure sealants for preventing dental decay in permanent teeth.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;7:CD001830, 2017 07 31.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Dental sealants were introduced in the 1960s to help prevent dental caries, mainly in the pits and fissures of occlusal tooth surfaces. Sealants act to prevent bacteria growth that can lead to dental decay. Evidence suggests that fissure sealants are effective in preventing caries in children and adolescents compared to no sealants. Effectiveness may, however, be related to caries incidence level of the population. This is an update of a review published in 2004, 2008 and 2013. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of different types of fissure sealants in preventing caries in occlusal surfaces of permanent teeth in children and adolescents. SEARCH METHODS: Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 3 August 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2016, Issue 7), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 3 August 2016), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 3 August 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials to 3 August 2016. No restrictions were placed on language or date of publication. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing sealants with no sealant or a different type of sealant material for preventing caries of occlusal surfaces of premolar or molar teeth in children and adolescents aged up to 20 years. Studies required at least 12 months follow-up. We excluded studies that compared compomers to resins/composites. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. We presented outcomes for caries or no caries on occlusal surfaces of permanent molar teeth as odds ratio (OR) or risk ratio (RR). We used mean difference (MD) for mean caries increment. All measures were presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We conducted meta-analyses using a random-effects model for comparisons where there were more than three trials; otherwise we used the fixed-effect model. We used GRADE methods to assess evidence quality. MAIN RESULTS: We included 38 trials that involved a total of 7924 children; seven trials were new for this update (1693 participants). Fifteen trials evaluated the effects of resin-based sealant versus no sealant (3620 participants in 14 studies plus 575 tooth pairs in one study); three trials with evaluated glass ionomer sealant versus no sealant (905 participants); and 24 trials evaluated one type of sealant versus another (4146 participants). Children were aged from 5 to 16 years. Trials rarely reported background exposure to fluoride of trial participants or baseline caries prevalence. Resin-based sealant versus no sealant: second-, third- and fourth-generation resin-based sealants prevented caries in first permanent molars in children aged 5 to 10 years (at 24 months follow-up: OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.19, 7 trials (5 published in the 1970s; 2 in the 2010s), 1548 children randomised, 1322 children evaluated; moderate-quality evidence). If we were to assume that 16% of the control tooth surfaces were decayed during 24 months of follow-up (160 carious teeth per 1000), then applying a resin-based sealant would reduce the proportion of carious surfaces to 5.2% (95% CI 3.13% to 7.37%). Similarly, assuming that 40% of control tooth surfaces were decayed (400 carious teeth per 1000), then applying a resin-based sealant would reduce the proportion of carious surfaces to 6.25% (95% CI 3.84% to 9.63%). If 70% of control tooth surfaces were decayed, there would be 19% decayed surfaces in the sealant group (95% CI 12.3% to 27.2%). This caries-preventive effect was maintained at longer follow-up but evidence quality and quantity was reduced (e.g. at 48 to 54 months of follow-up: OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.28, 4 trials, 482 children evaluated; RR 0.24, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.45, 203 children evaluated). Although studies were generally well conducted, we assessed blinding of outcome assessment for caries at high risk of bias for all trials (blinding of outcome assessment is not possible in sealant studies because outcome assessors can see and identify sealant). Glass ionomer sealant versus no sealant: was evaluated by three studies. Results at 24 months were inconclusive (very low-quality evidence). One sealant versus another sealant: the relative effectiveness of different types of sealants is unknown (very low-quality evidence). We included 24 trials that directly compared two different sealant materials. Comparisons varied in terms of types of sealant assessed, outcome measures chosen and duration of follow-up. Adverse events: only four trials assessed adverse events. No adverse events were reported. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Resin-based sealants applied on occlusal surfaces of permanent molars are effective for preventing caries in children and adolescents. Our review found moderate-quality evidence that resin-based sealants reduced caries by between 11% and 51% compared to no sealant, when measured at 24 months. Similar benefit was seen at timepoints up to 48 months; after longer follow-up, the quantity and quality of evidence was reduced. There was insufficient evidence to judge the effectiveness of glass ionomer sealant or the relative effectiveness of different types of sealants. Information on adverse effects was limited but none occurred where this was reported. Further research with long follow-up is needed.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cárie Dentária/prevenção & controle
Oclusão Dentária
Dentição Permanente
Selantes de Fossas e Fissuras/uso terapêutico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Resinas Acrílicas/uso terapêutico
Adolescente
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Seres Humanos
Dente Molar
Selantes de Fossas e Fissuras/efeitos adversos
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
Dióxido de Silício/uso terapêutico
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Acrylic Resins); 0 (Pit and Fissure Sealants); 0 (glass ionomer); 7631-86-9 (Silicon Dioxide)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170911
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170911
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170801
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD001830.pub5


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[PMID]:28752513
[Au] Autor:Masterson EE; Fitzpatrick AL; Enquobahrie DA; Mancl LA; Conde E; Hujoel PP
[Ad] Endereço:School of Dentistry, Department of Oral Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, DC, 98119.
[Ti] Título:Malnutrition-related early childhood exposures and enamel defects in the permanent dentition: A longitudinal study from the Bolivian Amazon.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;164(2):416-423, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: We investigated the relationship between early childhood malnutrition-related measures and subsequent enamel defects in the permanent dentition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cohort study included 349 Amerindian adolescents (10-17 years, 52% male) from the Bolivian Amazon. Exposures included: stunted growth (height-for-age z-scores), underweight (weight-for-age z-scores), anemia (hemoglobin), acute inflammation (C-reactive protein) and parasitic infection (hookworm). We measured the occurrence (no/yes) and extent (<1/3, 1/3-2/3, >2/3) of enamel defects. We estimated associations between childhood exposures and enamel defect measures using log-binomial and multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS: The prevalence of an enamel defect characterized by an orange peel texture on a large central depression on the labial surface of the central maxillary incisors was 92.3%. During childhood (1-4 years), participants had a high prevalence of stunted growth (75.2%), anemia (56.9%), acute inflammation (39.1%), and hookworm infection (49.6%). We observed associations between childhood height-for-age (OR = 0.65; P = 0.028 for >2/3 extent vs. no EH) and gastrointestinal hookworm infection (OR = 3.43; P = 0.035 for >2/3 extent vs. no defects or <1/3 extent) with enamel defects. DISCUSSION: The study describes a possibly novel form of enamel hypoplasia and provides evidence for associations of malnutrition-related measures in early childhood, including stunted growth and parasitic helminth infection, with the observed enamel defects.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Hipoplasia do Esmalte Dentário
Desnutrição
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Antropologia Física
Bolívia/epidemiologia
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Hipoplasia do Esmalte Dentário/epidemiologia
Hipoplasia do Esmalte Dentário/etiologia
Hipoplasia do Esmalte Dentário/patologia
Dentição Permanente
Feminino
Transtornos do Crescimento
Seres Humanos
Índios Sul-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos
Lactente
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Desnutrição/complicações
Desnutrição/epidemiologia
Dente/patologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171002
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171002
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170729
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23283


  8 / 1372 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28668099
[Au] Autor:Mccann CT; Welbury RR
[Ti] Título:The Emergency Treatment of Traumatised Permanent Anterior Teeth in Children and Adolescents.
[So] Source:Prim Dent J;6(2):36-45, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:2050-1684
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This article aims to provide a practical clinician's guide to assessing and diagnosing dental trauma involving permanent teeth in children and young people, and for carrying out appropriate, guideline supported acute management. Timely referral to specialist paediatric dental services is crucial in more complex trauma presentations and will lead to improved outcomes for the dentition. Appropriate acute management by the primary clinician optimises the prognosis of any traumatised tooth and this article will focus on the emergency treatment of the traumatised permanent tooth.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Traumatismos Craniocerebrais/terapia
Assistência Odontológica para Crianças/métodos
Tratamento de Emergência
Traumatismos Dentários/terapia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Criança
Dentição Permanente
Feminino
Guias como Assunto
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Planejamento de Assistência ao Paciente
Prognóstico
Encaminhamento e Consulta
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170821
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170821
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:D
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170703
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1308/205016817821281765


  9 / 1372 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28644755
[Au] Autor:Pahel BT; Vann WF; Divaris K; Rozier RG
[Ad] Endereço:1 Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
[Ti] Título:A Contemporary Examination of First and Second Permanent Molar Emergence.
[So] Source:J Dent Res;96(10):1115-1121, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1544-0591
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The emergence of first permanent molars (FPMs) and second permanent molars (SPMs) is an important developmental milestone influencing caries risk and the timing of sealant placement. Emergence times have been shown to vary by sex and race/ethnicity, while recent reports suggest a positive association with adiposity. Amid the changing demographics of the US population and the rising rates of pediatric overweight/obesity, we sought to examine the association of body mass index (BMI) with FPM/SPM emergence in a representative sample of US children and adolescents. We used cross-sectional data from 3 consecutive cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2009 to 2014). The FPM analysis included ages 4 to 8 y ( n = 3,102 representing ~20 million children), and the SPM analysis included ages 9 to 13 y ( n = 2,774 representing ~19 million children/adolescents). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's growth chart data were used to calculate age- and sex-specific BMI percentiles, as measures of adiposity. Initial data analyses relied on descriptive statistics and stratified analyses. We used multivariate methods, including survey linear and ordinal logistic regression and marginal effects estimation to quantify the association between pediatric overweight/obesity and FPM/SPM emergence, adjusting for age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Forty-eight percent of 6-y-olds and 98% of 8-y-olds had all FPMs emerged, whereas SPM emergence varied more. Blacks (vs. whites) and females (vs. males) experienced earlier emergence of FPMs and SPMs. Overweight/obesity was associated with earlier FPM emergence, particularly among black females. Obesity but not overweight was associated with earlier SPM emergence. Overall, overweight/obesity accounted for 6 to 12 mo of dental acceleration. This study's results emanate from the most recent US-representative data and affirm that FPM/SPM emergence varies by race/ethnicity and sex and is positively influenced by BMI. Future research should further elucidate these associations with detailed eruption data and examine the implications of this variation for clinical care.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dente Molar
Erupção Dentária/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Fatores Etários
Índice de Massa Corporal
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Estudos Transversais
Cárie Dentária/prevenção & controle
Dentição Permanente
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Inquéritos Nutricionais
Selantes de Fossas e Fissuras/uso terapêutico
Fatores Sexuais
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Pit and Fissure Sealants)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170918
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170918
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:D; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170624
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/0022034517716395


  10 / 1372 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28626923
[Au] Autor:Paul KS; Stojanowski CM
[Ad] Endereço:Center for Bioarchaeological Research, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287.
[Ti] Título:Comparative performance of deciduous and permanent dental morphology in detecting biological relatives.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;164(1):97-116, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: Dental morphology plays a key role in reconstructing population history and evolutionary relationships at global, regional, and intracemetery scales. At the inter-individual level, it is assumed that close biological kin exhibit greater phenotypic similarity than non-relatives. Heritability estimates provide one measure of phenotypic resemblance but are not easily incorporated into analyses of archaeological samples. In this study we evaluate the assumption that relatives are more similar phenotypically than non-relatives. We compare results for permanent dental morphology to those obtained using deciduous dental morphology in a matched dataset (Paul & Stojanowski, ). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Permanent trait expression was scored from dental casts representing 69 sibling pairs, curated as part of the longitudinal Burlington Growth Study. Simulating a biodistance approach, 22 morphological traits of permanent tooth crowns were used to generate 69 inter-relative and 2,076 non-relative Euclidean distances. Following distance ordination, family-specific dispersion values were calculated from multidimensional scaling coordinates. Output was compared to that of a previous study that focused on deciduous crown variation in the same set of individuals (Paul & Stojanowski, ). Mantel tests were used to evaluate the correlation of a proxy genetic distance matrix to both the permanent and deciduous dental distance matrices. RESULTS: On average, inter-relative distances generated from morphological traits of permanent tooth crowns were smaller than expected by chance based on resampling (p < 0.001). While family-specific dispersion varied greatly for both permanent and deciduous datasets, over 75% of the families exhibited greater dispersion with permanent traits. This suggests that morphological traits of the permanent dentition provide a less faithful reflection of biological relatedness than morphological traits of the deciduous dentition. Mantel tests indicate that both the deciduous and permanent distance matrices are significantly correlated with a matrix of genetic relatedness coefficients; however, the magnitude of the correlations was low. DISCUSSION: Overall, morphological traits of permanent tooth crowns perform moderately well in distinguishing relatives from non-relatives, but deciduous crown variations may provide a more direct reflection of the underlying genetic structure of intra-site or intra-cemetery samples. These findings have implications for bioarchaeological research and biodistance practices. In particular, morphological traits of the deciduous dentition should be incorporated into standard data collection protocols because of their stronger signal of relatedness.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dentição Permanente
Irmãos
Dente Decíduo/anatomia & histologia
Dente/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Antropologia Física
Criança
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Odontometria
Estatísticas não Paramétricas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170911
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170911
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170620
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23260



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