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Pesquisa : B01.050.150.900.248.620.750 [Categoria DeCS]
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  1 / 3773 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29381764
[Au] Autor:Kaushik M; Pejchar L; Crampton LH
[Ad] Endereço:Wildlife Institute of India, Chandrabani, Dehardun, India.
[Ti] Título:Potential disruption of seed dispersal in the absence of a native Kauai thrush.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191992, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Hawaii has experienced a catastrophic decline in frugivorous native birds coupled with the introduction of non-native species. Puaiohi (Myadestes palmeri), a critically endangered thrush, is the sole extant native songbird capable of dispersing fleshy fruited plants in the rainforest of Kauai island, Hawaii. As this species has declined to occupy a small proportion of its original range, a suite of largely omnivorous non-native birds have been introduced to this region, including the common and widespread Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus). This reshuffling of the bird community could have long-term implications for plant community composition if introduced birds incompletely replace the ecological role of native species. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential consequences of the local extirpation of Puaiohi for seed dispersal. Specifically, we compared the diet of Puaiohi and Japanese White-eye, vegetation characteristics, and seed rain at sites with and without Puaiohi in the Na Pali-Kona Forest Reserve on the island of Kauai. We found high overlap in the composition of seeds consumed by the two bird species, but differences in the characteristics of seeds consumed; Japanese White-eye appeared more likely to consume smaller seeded species compared with Puaiohi. Sites with Puaiohi received substantially higher seed rain during the study period, despite no significant differences in overall fruit abundance. Our results suggest that non-native birds are unlikely to completely replace the seed dispersal services provided by Puaiohi. If Puaohi continue to be rare and range restricted, we predict a shift in plant community composition through an increase in non-native and small-seeded plants, and possible dispersal failure of other native species. Our findings lend further support to efforts to conserve Puaiohi across its current and former range, and to consider introductions to other suitable areas to ensure the persistence not only of the species and but also its functional role in Hawaii's montane ecosystems.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Sementes
Aves Canoras/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Hawaii
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191992


  2 / 3773 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29351548
[Au] Autor:Geltsch N; Elek Z; Manczinger L; Vágvölgyi C; Moskát C
[Ad] Endereço:MTA-ELTE-MTM Ecology Research Group, a joint research group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, the Biological Institute of the Eötvös Loránd University and the Hungarian Natural History Museum, Budapest, Hungary.
[Ti] Título:Common cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) affect the bacterial diversity of the eggshells of their great reed warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) hosts.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191364, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) is an avian brood parasite, laying its eggs in the nests of other bird species, where these hosts incubate the parasitic eggs, feed and rear the nestlings. The appearance of a cuckoo egg in a host nest may change the bacterial community in the nest. This may have consequences on the hatchability of host eggs, even when hosts reject the parasitic egg, typically within six days after parasitism. The present study revealed the bacterial community of cuckoo eggshells and those of the great reed warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus), one of the main hosts of cuckoos. We compared host eggs from non-parasitized clutches, as well as host and cuckoo eggs from parasitized clutches. As incubation may change bacterial assemblages on eggshells, we compared these egg types in two stages: the egg-laying stage, when incubation has not been started, and the mid-incubation stage (ca. on days 5-7 in incubation), where heat from the incubating female dries eggshells. Our results obtained by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing technique showed that fresh host and cuckoo eggs had partially different bacterial communities, but they became more similar during incubation in parasitized nests. Cluster analysis revealed that fresh cuckoo eggs and incubated host eggs in unparasitized nests (where no cuckoo effect could have happened) were the most dissimilar from the other groups of eggs. Cuckoo eggs did not reduce the hatchability of great reed warbler eggs. Our results on the cuckoo-great reed warbler relationship supported the idea that brood parasites may change bacterial microbiota in the host nest. Further studies should reveal how bacterial communities of cuckoo eggshells may vary by host-specific races (gentes) of cuckoos.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aves/microbiologia
Casca de Ovo/microbiologia
Aves Canoras/microbiologia
Aves Canoras/parasitologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Biodiversidade
Aves/fisiologia
Feminino
Interações Hospedeiro-Parasita/genética
Microbiota/genética
Comportamento de Nidação
RNA Bacteriano/genética
RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética
Aves Canoras/fisiologia
Especificidade da Espécie
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (RNA, Bacterial); 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191364


  3 / 3773 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29294204
[Au] Autor:Yang C; Huang Q; Wang L; Du WG; Liang W; Møller AP
[Ad] Endereço:Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Ecology of Tropical Islands, College of Life Sciences, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158, China.
[Ti] Título:Keeping eggs warm: thermal and developmental advantages for parasitic cuckoos of laying unusually thick-shelled eggs.
[So] Source:Naturwissenschaften;105(1-2):10, 2018 Jan 02.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1904
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Obligate brood parasites have evolved unusually thick-shelled eggs, which are hypothesized to possess a variety of functions such as resistance to puncture ejection by their hosts. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that obligate brood parasites lay unusually thick-shelled eggs to retain more heat for the developing embryo and thus contribute to early hatching of parasite eggs. By doing so, we used an infrared thermal imaging system as a non-invasive method to quantify the temperature of eggshells of common cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) and their Oriental reed warbler (Acrocephalus orientalis) hosts in an experiment that artificially altered the duration of incubation. Our results showed that cuckoo eggshells had higher temperature than host eggs during incubation, but also less fluctuations in temperature during incubation disturbance. Therefore, there was a thermal and hence a developmental advantage for brood parasitic cuckoos of laying thick-shelled eggs, providing another possible explanation for the unusually thick-shelled eggs of obligate brood parasites and earlier hatching of cuckoo eggs compared to those of the host.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Aves/anatomia & histologia
Regulação da Temperatura Corporal
Casca de Ovo/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Aves/embriologia
Aves/fisiologia
Interações Hospedeiro-Parasita
Reprodução
Aves Canoras/parasitologia
Temperatura Ambiente
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180103
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00114-017-1532-y


  4 / 3773 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28454917
[Au] Autor:He R; Pagani-Núñez E; Chevallier C; Barnett CRA
[Ad] Endereço:College of Forestry, Guangxi University, Nanning, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Título:To be so bold: boldness is repeatable and related to within individual behavioural variability in North Island robins.
[So] Source:Behav Processes;140:144-149, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8308
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Behavioural research traditionally focusses on the mean responses of a group of individuals rather than variation in behaviour around the mean or among individuals. However, examining the variation in behaviour among and within individuals may also yield important insights into the evolution and maintenance of behaviour. Repeatability is the most commonly used measure of variability among individuals in behavioural research. However, there are other forms of variation within populations that have received less attention. One such measure is intraindividual variation in behaviour (IIV), which is a short-term fluctuation of within-individual behaviour. Such variation in behaviour might be important during interactions because it could decrease the ability of conspecific and heterospecific individuals to predict the behaviour of the subject, thus increasing the cost of the interaction. In this experiment, we made repeated measures of the latency of North Island robins to attack a prey in a novel situation (a form of boldness) and examined (i) repeatability of boldness (the propensity to take a risk), (ii) IIV of boldness, and (iii) whether there was a significant relationship between these two traits (a behavioural syndrome). We found that boldness was highly repeatable, that there were high levels of IIV in boldness, and that there was a negative relationship between boldness and IIV in boldness. This suggests that despite high levels of repeatability for this behaviour, there were also still significant differences in IIV among different individuals within the population. Moreover, bolder individuals had significantly less IIV in their boldness, which suggests that they were forming routines (which reduces behavioural variability) compared to shyer individuals. Our results definitively demonstrate that IIV itself varies across individuals and is linked with key behavioural traits, and we argue for the importance of future studies aimed at understanding its causes and consequences for behavioural interactions.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Agressão/psicologia
Aves Canoras/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Alimentar
Feminino
Individualidade
Masculino
Personalidade
Comportamento Predatório
Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
Timidez
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180213
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180213
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170430
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  5 / 3773 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29324772
[Au] Autor:Contina A; Bridge ES; Ross JD; Shipley JR; Kelly JF
[Ad] Endereço:Oklahoma Biological Survey, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Examination of Clock and Adcyap1 gene variation in a neotropical migratory passerine.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190859, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Complex behavioral traits, such as those making up a migratory phenotype, are regulated by multiple environmental factors and multiple genes. We investigated possible relationships between microsatellite variation at two candidate genes implicated in the control of migratory behavior, Clock and Adcyap1, and several aspects of migratory life-history and evolutionary divergence in the Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris), a species that shows wide variation in migratory and molting strategies across a disjunct distribution. We focused on Clock and Adcyap1 microsatellite variation across three Painted Bunting populations in Oklahoma, Louisiana, and North Carolina, and for the Oklahoma breeding population we used published migration tracking data on adult males to explore phenotypic variation in individual migratory behavior. We found no correlation between microsatellite allele size within either Clock and Adcyap1 relative to the initiation or duration of fall migration in adult males breeding in Oklahoma. We also show the lack of significant correlations with aspects of the migratory phenotype for the Louisiana population. Our research highlights the limitations of studying microsatellite allelic mutations that are of undetermined functional influence relative to complex behavioral phenotypes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Proteínas Aviárias/genética
Proteínas CLOCK/genética
Variação Genética
Repetições de Microssatélites
Polipeptídeo Hipofisário Ativador de Adenilato Ciclase/genética
Aves Canoras/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Alelos
Migração Animal
Animais
Evolução Biológica
Estudos de Associação Genética
Louisiana
Masculino
Muda/genética
Mutação
North Carolina
Oklahoma
Fenótipo
Aves Canoras/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Avian Proteins); 0 (Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide); EC 2.3.1.48 (CLOCK Proteins)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180206
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180206
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190859


  6 / 3773 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28470122
[Au] Autor:Dawson A
[Ad] Endereço:Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Penicuik, Midlothian, UK.
[Ti] Título:Daily Cycles in Body Temperature in a Songbird Change with Photoperiod and Are Weakly Circadian.
[So] Source:J Biol Rhythms;32(2):177-183, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1552-4531
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Although it is well known that body temperature (Tb) is higher during the day in diurnal birds than at night, no data are available regarding exactly how Tb varies during a 24-h period, how this differs under different photoperiods, and how it responds to a change in photoperiod. This study used implanted temperature loggers in starlings ( Sturnus vulgaris) to address these questions. The duration of elevated Tb was directly related to photoperiod, but the amplitude of the daily cycle was significantly greater under shorter photoperiods. Under all photoperiods, Tb started to increase before dawn and continued to increase after dawn; there was no sudden change associated with dawn. In contrast, Tb decreased immediately and rapidly at dusk (significantly by 15 min). The daily cycle in Tb rapidly adjusted to a change in photoperiod. Following an acute increase in photoperiod, Tb increased immediately at the new earlier dawn but did not decrease until the new later dusk. Following a decrease in photoperiod, Tb did not increase after the time of the missed dawn; it only increased after the new later dawn. It decreased at the new earlier dusk. Following transfer to constant darkness, there was a moderate increase in Tb around the missed dawn, but then Tb gradually decreased before the missed dusk to lower values than during the previous night. The results suggest that the daily cycle in Tb is weakly circadian and may be entrained by dusk rather than dawn.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Temperatura Corporal
Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia
Fotoperíodo
Aves Canoras/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Escuridão
Luz
Melatonina/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
JL5DK93RCL (Melatonin)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180126
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180126
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/0748730417691206


  7 / 3773 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29218330
[Au] Autor:Bowers EK; Sakaluk SK; Thompson CF
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biological Sciences and Edward J. Meeman Biological Station, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee.
[Ti] Título:Interactive effects of parental age on offspring fitness and age-assortative mating in a wild bird.
[So] Source:J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol;327(5):302-310, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2471-5646
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Variation in parental age can have important consequences for offspring fitness and the structure of populations and disease transmission. However, our understanding of the effects of parental age on offspring in natural populations is limited. Here, we investigate consequences of parental age for offspring fitness and test for age-assortative mating in a short-lived bird, the house wren ( ). Offspring immunoresponsiveness increased with maternal age and decreased with paternal age, but the strength of these effects varied with the age of one's mate. Offspring immunoresponsiveness was augmented most with older mothers and younger fathers. Thus, we expected this combination of ages to yield the highest offspring fitness. However, offspring recruitment, longevity, and lifetime reproductive success were greatest when both parents were of above-average age. Consistent with the interactive effects of parental age on offspring fitness, we detected positive age-assortative mating among breeding pairs. Our results suggest that selection favors age-assortative mating, but in different ways depending on how parental ages affect offspring. We suggest that, in this short-lived species, selection for combinations of parental ages that maximize offspring immune responses is likely weaker than selection to produce breeding adults.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Envelhecimento/fisiologia
Animais Selvagens
Reprodução/fisiologia
Aves Canoras/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180122
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180122
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/jez.2090


  8 / 3773 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28453623
[Au] Autor:Wang M; Uebbing S; Ellegren H
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Evolutionary Biology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Sweden.
[Ti] Título:Bayesian Inference of Allele-Specific Gene Expression Indicates Abundant Cis-Regulatory Variation in Natural Flycatcher Populations.
[So] Source:Genome Biol Evol;9(5):1266-1279, 2017 05 01.
[Is] ISSN:1759-6653
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Polymorphism in cis-regulatory sequences can lead to different levels of expression for the two alleles of a gene, providing a starting point for the evolution of gene expression. Little is known about the genome-wide abundance of genetic variation in gene regulation in natural populations but analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE) provides a means for investigating such variation. We performed RNA-seq of multiple tissues from population samples of two closely related flycatcher species and developed a Bayesian algorithm that maximizes data usage by borrowing information from the whole data set and combines several SNPs per transcript to detect ASE. Of 2,576 transcripts analyzed in collared flycatcher, ASE was detected in 185 (7.2%) and a similar frequency was seen in the pied flycatcher. Transcripts with statistically significant ASE commonly showed the major allele in >90% of the reads, reflecting that power was highest when expression was heavily biased toward one of the alleles. This would suggest that the observed frequencies of ASE likely are underestimates. The proportion of ASE transcripts varied among tissues, being lowest in testis and highest in muscle. Individuals often showed ASE of particular transcripts in more than one tissue (73.4%), consistent with a genetic basis for regulation of gene expression. The results suggest that genetic variation in regulatory sequences commonly affects gene expression in natural populations and that it provides a seedbed for phenotypic evolution via divergence in gene expression.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Variação Genética
Aves Canoras/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Algoritmos
Animais
Teorema de Bayes
Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
Análise de Sequência de RNA
Aves Canoras/classificação
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171206
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171206
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/gbe/evx080


  9 / 3773 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29088288
[Au] Autor:Kiat Y
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, Edmond J. Safra Campus, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.
[Ti] Título:Divergent primary moult-A rare moult sequence among Western Palaearctic passerines.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0187282, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Wing morphology strongly affects flight performance which may consequently decline during feather moult due to the creation of feather gaps in the wing. Hence, the size and shape of moult-related wing gap may directly affect flight capacity. Here I examined the rare divergent primary moult sequence compared to the more common descendant moult sequence. In the divergent moult, the focus of primary moult is shifted from P1 (primary feather numbered descendantly) to another primary between P2 and P5, and then primaries are moulted in two concurrent waves, one descendant and the other ascendant. The result of this rare moult sequence is the splitting of the wing gap to two smaller gaps. Using a large moult database including 6,763 individuals of 32 Western Palaearctic passerine species, I found evidence of divergent moult only among 27 individuals of 12 species. I examined the speed of wing-feather moult for each individual that moulted divergently compared to a control group of individuals at the same moult stage which moulted following the common descending sequence. The results indicate that the sequence of primary moult and moult speed are correlated. Individuals which moulted divergently moulted their primaries with higher moult speed than descendant moulters. The applicability of this study is weakened by the dearth of moult data, thus making it difficult to draw conclusions for a large range of species. Ornithologists and bird ringers are therefore encouraged to collect more basic moult data during their field study.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Muda/fisiologia
Passeriformes/fisiologia
Asas de Animais/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Plumas/anatomia & histologia
Plumas/fisiologia
Voo Animal/fisiologia
Israel
Passeriformes/anatomia & histologia
Aves Canoras/anatomia & histologia
Aves Canoras/fisiologia
Fatores de Tempo
Asas de Animais/anatomia & histologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171113
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171113
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171101
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0187282


  10 / 3773 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29059252
[Au] Autor:Harrower WL; Srivastava DS; McCallum C; Fraser LH; Turkington R
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
[Ti] Título:Temperate grassland songbird species accumulate incrementally along a gradient of primary productivity.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0186809, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Global analyses of bird communities along elevation gradients suggest that bird diversity on arid mountains is primarily limited by water availability, not temperature or altitude. However, the mechanism by which water availability, and subsequently primary productivity, increases bird diversity is still unclear. Here we evaluate two possible mechanisms from species-energy theory. The more individuals hypothesis proposes that a higher availability of resources increases the total number of individuals that can be supported, and therefore the greater number of species that will be sampled. By contrast, the more specialization hypothesis proposes that increasing resource availability will permit specialists to exploit otherwise rare resources, thus increasing total diversity. We used 5 years of surveys of grassland songbird communities along an elevational gradient in British Columbia, Canada, to distinguish between these hypotheses. Vegetation changed markedly in composition along the gradient and contrary to the expectations of the more specialization hypothesis, bird community composition was remarkably constant. However, both total abundance and species richness of birds increased with increasing water availability to plants. When we used rarefaction to correct species richness for differences in total abundance, much of the increase in bird diversity was lost, consistent with the expectations of the more individuals hypothesis. Furthermore, high species richness was associated with reductions in territory size of common bird species, rather than the fine-scale spatial partitioning of the landscape. This suggests that bird diversity increases when greater resource availability allows higher densities rather than greater habitat specialization. These results help explain a pervasive global pattern in bird diversity on arid mountains, and suggest that in such landscapes conservation of grassland birds is strongly linked to climate and hydrology.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Pradaria
Aves Canoras/classificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Biodiversidade
Colúmbia Britânica
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171113
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171113
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171024
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0186809



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