Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : B01.050.150.900.248.620.750.250 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 1563 [refinar]
Mostrando: 1 .. 10   no formato [Detalhado]

página 1 de 157 ir para página                         

  1 / 1563 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29330588
[Au] Autor:Provini P; Abourachid A
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Adaptations du Vivant, National Museum of Natural History, UMR 7179, AVIV, 57 rue Cuvier, case postale 55, Paris, 75231, France. pauline.provini@mnhn.fr.
[Ti] Título:Whole-body 3D kinematics of bird take-off: key role of the legs to propel the trunk.
[So] Source:Naturwissenschaften;105(1-2):12, 2018 Jan 06.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1904
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Previous studies showed that birds primarily use their hindlimbs to propel themselves into the air in order to take-off. Yet, it remains unclear how the different parts of their musculoskeletal system move to produce the necessary acceleration. To quantify the relative motions of the bones during the terrestrial phase of take-off, we used biplanar fluoroscopy in two species of birds, diamond dove (Geopelia cuneata) and zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). We obtained a detailed 3D kinematics analysis of the head, the trunk and the three long bones of the left leg. We found that the entire body assisted the production of the needed forces to take-off, during two distinct but complementary phases. The first one, a relatively slow preparatory phase, started with a movement of the head and an alignment of the different groups of bones with the future take-off direction. It was associated with a pitch down of the trunk and a flexion of the ankle, of the hip and, to a lesser extent, of the knee. This crouching movement could contribute to the loading of the leg muscles and store elastic energy that could be released in the propulsive phase of take-off, during the extension of the leg joints. Combined with the fact that the head, together with the trunk, produced a forward momentum, the entire body assisted the production of the needed forces to take-off. The second phase was faster with mostly horizontal forward and vertical upward translation motions, synchronous to an extension of the entire lower articulated musculoskeletal system. It led to the propulsion of the bird in the air with a fundamental role of the hip and ankle joints to move the trunk upward and forward. Take-off kinematics were similar in both studied species, with a more pronounced crouching movement in diamond dove, which can be related to a large body mass compared to zebra finch.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Columbidae/fisiologia
Tentilhões/fisiologia
Voo Animal/fisiologia
Membro Posterior/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Aceleração
Animais
Fenômenos Biomecânicos
Osso e Ossos/fisiologia
Columbidae/anatomia & histologia
Tentilhões/anatomia & histologia
Fluoroscopia
Membro Posterior/anatomia & histologia
Músculo Esquelético/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180114
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00114-017-1535-8


  2 / 1563 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29202116
[Au] Autor:Grindstaff JL; Merrill L
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Integrative Biology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma.
[Ti] Título:Developmental corticosterone treatment does not program immune responses in zebra finches ( ).
[So] Source:J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol;327(5):262-272, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2471-5646
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Developmental conditions may impact the expression of immune traits throughout an individual's life. Early-life challenges may lead to immunological constraints that are mediated by endocrine-immune interactions. In particular, individual differences in the ability to mount immune responses may be programmed by exposure to stressors or glucocorticoid hormones during development. To test this hypothesis, we experimentally elevated levels of the glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone during the nestling and fledgling periods in captive zebra finches ( ). We subsequently challenged birds with the antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on days 60 and 100 post-hatch to determine if developmental exposure to elevated corticosterone impacted the later response to LPS. As measures of immune function, we quantified bacteria killing ability, haptoglobin concentrations, and LPS-specific antibody responses at multiple time points. We also measured circulating corticosterone concentrations during the experimental period and on day 60 before and after endotoxin challenge. During the experimental period, corticosterone treatment elevated corticosterone levels. Corticosterone treatment did not induce programming effects on immune function or corticosterone production. Independent of treatment, individuals with higher corticosterone concentrations during the nestling period had lower bacteria killing ability on day 36 and higher baseline corticosterone concentrations on day 60 post-hatch. These results suggest a limited role for corticosterone exposure during early life to mediate immunological constraints later in life. Manipulation of cortisol may be necessary to conclusively determine if developmental glucocorticoid exposure can program immune function in birds. To determine if developmental stress can program the immune response, exposure to environmentally relevant stressors should also be manipulated.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Anti-Inflamatórios/farmacologia
Corticosterona/farmacologia
Tentilhões/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Tentilhões/imunologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Anti-Inflamatórios/administração & dosagem
Anti-Inflamatórios/sangue
Corticosterona/administração & dosagem
Corticosterona/sangue
Feminino
Tentilhões/sangue
Lipopolissacarídeos/toxicidade
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents); 0 (Lipopolysaccharides); W980KJ009P (Corticosterone)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180122
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180122
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171205
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/jez.2086


  3 / 1563 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29190647
[Au] Autor:Krause ET; Krüger O; Hoffman JI
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Animal Behaviour, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany.
[Ti] Título:The influence of inherited plumage colour morph on morphometric traits and breeding investment in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(11):e0188582, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Melanin-based plumage polymorphism occurs in many wild bird populations and has been linked to fitness variation in several species. These fitness differences often arise as a consequence of variation in traits such as behaviour, immune responsiveness, body size and reproductive investment. However, few studies have controlled for genetic differences between colour morphs that could potentially generate artefactual associations between plumage colouration and trait variation. Here, we used zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) as a model system in order to evaluate whether life-history traits such as adult body condition and reproductive investment could be influenced by plumage morph. To maximise any potential differences, we selected wild-type and white plumage morphs, which differ maximally in their extent of melanisation, while using a controlled three-generation breeding design to homogenise the genetic background. We found that F2 adults with white plumage colouration were on average lighter and had poorer body condition than wild-type F2 birds. However, they appeared to compensate for this by reproducing earlier and producing heavier eggs relative to their own body mass. Our study thus reveals differences in morphological and life history traits that could be relevant to fitness variation, although further studies will be required to evaluate fitness effects under natural conditions as well as to characterise any potential fitness costs of compensatory strategies in white zebra finches.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cor
Plumas
Tentilhões/fisiologia
Comportamento Sexual Animal
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Tentilhões/anatomia & histologia
Masculino
Reprodução
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188582


  4 / 1563 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28911174
[Au] Autor:Hirst CE; Major AT; Ayers KL; Brown RJ; Mariette M; Sackton TB; Smith CA
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.
[Ti] Título:Sex Reversal and Comparative Data Undermine the W Chromosome and Support Z-linked DMRT1 as the Regulator of Gonadal Sex Differentiation in Birds.
[So] Source:Endocrinology;158(9):2970-2987, 2017 Sep 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7170
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The exact genetic mechanism regulating avian gonadal sex differentiation has not been completely resolved. The most likely scenario involves a dosage mechanism, whereby the Z-linked DMRT1 gene triggers testis development. However, the possibility still exists that the female-specific W chromosome may harbor an ovarian determining factor. In this study, we provide evidence that the universal gene regulating gonadal sex differentiation in birds is Z-linked DMRT1 and not a W-linked (ovarian) factor. Three candidate W-linked ovarian determinants are HINTW, female-expressed transcript 1 (FET1), and female-associated factor (FAF). To test the association of these genes with ovarian differentiation in the chicken, we examined their expression following experimentally induced female-to-male sex reversal using the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole (FAD). Administration of FAD on day 3 of embryogenesis induced a significant loss of aromatase enzyme activity in female gonads and masculinization. However, expression levels of HINTW, FAF, and FET1 were unaltered after experimental masculinization. Furthermore, comparative analysis showed that FAF and FET1 expression could not be detected in zebra finch gonads. Additionally, an antibody raised against the predicted HINTW protein failed to detect it endogenously. These data do not support a universal role for these genes or for the W sex chromosome in ovarian development in birds. We found that DMRT1 (but not the recently identified Z-linked HEMGN gene) is male upregulated in embryonic zebra finch and emu gonads, as in the chicken. As chicken, zebra finch, and emu exemplify the major evolutionary clades of birds, we propose that Z-linked DMRT1, and not the W sex chromosome, regulates gonadal sex differentiation in birds.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aves
Cromossomos Sexuais/genética
Processos de Determinação Sexual/genética
Diferenciação Sexual/genética
Fatores de Transcrição/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Aves/embriologia
Aves/genética
Embrião de Galinha
Galinhas
Desenvolvimento Embrionário
Feminino
Feminização/embriologia
Feminização/genética
Tentilhões/embriologia
Tentilhões/genética
Regulação da Expressão Gênica no Desenvolvimento
Gônadas
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DMRT1 protein); 0 (Transcription Factors)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171002
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171002
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170916
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1210/en.2017-00316


  5 / 1563 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28753628
[Au] Autor:Pearre B; Perkins LN; Markowitz JE; Gardner TJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:A fast and accurate zebra finch syllable detector.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0181992, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The song of the adult male zebra finch is strikingly stereotyped. Efforts to understand motor output, pattern generation, and learning have taken advantage of this consistency by investigating the bird's ability to modify specific parts of song under external cues, and by examining timing relationships between neural activity and vocal output. Such experiments require that precise moments during song be identified in real time as the bird sings. Various syllable-detection methods exist, but many require special hardware, software, and know-how, and details on their implementation and performance are scarce. We present an accurate, versatile, and fast syllable detector that can control hardware at precisely timed moments during zebra finch song. Many moments during song can be isolated and detected with false negative and false positive rates well under 1% and 0.005% respectively. The detector can run on a stock Mac Mini with triggering delay of less than a millisecond and a jitter of σ ≈ 2 milliseconds.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Tentilhões/fisiologia
Reconhecimento Automatizado de Padrão/métodos
Vocalização Animal/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Intervalos de Confiança
Análise de Fourier
Espectrografia do Som
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170929
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170929
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170729
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0181992


  6 / 1563 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28686079
[Au] Autor:Deviche P; Desaivre S; Giraudeau M
[Ti] Título:Experimental Manipulation of Corticosterone Does Not Influence the Clearance Rate of Plasma Testosterone in Birds.
[So] Source:Physiol Biochem Zool;90(5):575-582, 2017 Sep/Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1537-5293
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In vertebrates, exposure to acute stressors stimulates the secretion of adrenal glucocorticoids such as corticosterone, and in some situations this hormone plays an important role in orchestrating the trade-off that exists between reproduction and self-maintenance. Stressful conditions often lead to a decrease in plasma levels of sex steroids such as testosterone in males, and it has been hypothesized that corticosterone contributes to this decrease. Generally supporting this proposition, glucocorticoids can inhibit the reproductive axis activity at multiple levels, including direct effects on testicular endocrine function. Here we tested for the first time the additional hypothesis that stress-induced glucocorticoids are associated with an increased clearance rate of circulating testosterone. To test this hypothesis, we performed two experiments comparing changes in plasma testosterone as a function of time (6-60 min) after a single injection of this hormone into captive male house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus) that either were intact (controls) or were pharmacologically adrenalectomized by administration of the glucocorticoid synthesis inhibitor mitotane. Control finches rapidly elevated their plasma corticosterone in response to handling, whereas mitotane treatment abolished this response by approximately 95%. Contrary to our prediction, we found no clear evidence that control birds eliminated exogenous testosterone from circulation at a different rate than pharmacologically adrenalectomized finches. These findings do not support the hypothesis that, during acute stress, elevated plasma glucocorticoids stimulate the clearance rate of testosterone. The rapid inhibitory effect of stress on plasma testosterone may rather result from direct actions of glucocorticoids on the gonadal production of the androgen or involve a glucocorticoid-independent mechanism.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Corticosterona/sangue
Tentilhões/sangue
Tentilhões/fisiologia
Mitotano/farmacologia
Testosterona/sangue
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antineoplásicos Hormonais/farmacologia
Corticosterona/metabolismo
Masculino
Estresse Fisiológico
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal); 3XMK78S47O (Testosterone); 78E4J5IB5J (Mitotane); W980KJ009P (Corticosterone)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170927
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170927
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170708
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1086/693043


  7 / 1563 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28617829
[Au] Autor:Danish HH; Aronov D; Fee MS
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Rhythmic syllable-related activity in a songbird motor thalamic nucleus necessary for learned vocalizations.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(6):e0169568, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Birdsong is a complex behavior that exhibits hierarchical organization. While the representation of singing behavior and its hierarchical organization has been studied in some detail in avian cortical premotor circuits, our understanding of the role of the thalamus in adult birdsong is incomplete. Using a combination of behavioral and electrophysiological studies, we seek to expand on earlier work showing that the thalamic nucleus Uvaeformis (Uva) is necessary for the production of stereotyped, adult song in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). We confirm that complete bilateral lesions of Uva abolish singing in the 'directed' social context, but find that in the 'undirected' social context, such lesions result in highly variable vocalizations similar to early babbling song in juvenile birds. Recordings of neural activity in Uva reveal strong syllable-related modulation, maximally active prior to syllable onsets and minimally active prior to syllable offsets. Furthermore, both song and Uva activity exhibit a pronounced coherent modulation at 10Hz-a pattern observed in downstream premotor areas in adult and, even more prominently, in juvenile birds. These findings are broadly consistent with the idea that Uva is critical in the sequential activation of behavioral modules in HVC.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Tentilhões/fisiologia
Núcleos Talâmicos/fisiologia
Vocalização Animal/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Masculino
Córtex Motor/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170914
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170914
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170616
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0169568


  8 / 1563 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28575175
[Au] Autor:Pedersen AL; Brownrout JL; Saldanha CJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biology, Behavior, Cognition, and Neuroscience Program, and the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, American University, Washington, DC 20016.
[Ti] Título:Central Administration of Indomethacin Mitigates the Injury-Induced Upregulation of Aromatase Expression and Estradiol Content in the Zebra Finch Brain.
[So] Source:Endocrinology;158(8):2585-2592, 2017 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7170
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Injury to the vertebrate brain causes neuroinflammation, characterized in part by increases in prostaglandins. In rodents and songbirds, brain injury also induces the transcription and translation of aromatase in reactive astrocytes around the site of damage. Interestingly, this induction is more rapid in female zebra finches relative to males. Induced aromatization is neuroprotective, as inhibition of aromatase and estrogen replacement, increases and decreases the extent of damage, respectively. Although the consequences of induced astrocytic aromatization are intensely studied, little is known about what factors induce aromatase. Inflammation is sufficient to induce astrocytic aromatase suggesting that the link between inflammation and aromatase expression may be causal. To test this hypothesis, adult male and female zebra finches received bilateral mechanical injuries through which either the cyclooxygenase (COX)-1/2 inhibitor indomethacin or vehicle was administered into contralateral hemispheres. Subjects were killed either 6 or 24 hours after injury. In both sexes, an enzyme immunoassay for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) revealed that indomethacin decreased PGE2 relative to the contralateral hemisphere at both time points, suggesting that the dose and mode of administration used were successful in affecting neuroinflammation locally. Indomethacin reduced aromatase expression and 17ß-estradiol (E2) content at 6 hours but not 24 hours following injury in females. However, in males, the inhibitory effect of indomethacin on aromatase and E2 was apparent at 24 but not 6 hours after treatment. These data suggest that COX activity, perhaps via consequent prostaglandin secretion, may induce aromatase expression and central E2, an effect that is detectable in temporally distinct patterns between sexes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aromatase/metabolismo
Lesões Encefálicas/tratamento farmacológico
Encéfalo/metabolismo
Estradiol/metabolismo
Tentilhões
Indometacina/farmacologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Anti-Inflamatórios não Esteroides
Encéfalo/patologia
Lesões Encefálicas/enzimologia
Dinoprostona/metabolismo
Feminino
Regulação Enzimológica da Expressão Gênica
Técnicas Imunoenzimáticas
Indometacina/administração & dosagem
Masculino
RNA Mensageiro/genética
RNA Mensageiro/metabolismo
Regulação para Cima
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal); 0 (RNA, Messenger); 4TI98Z838E (Estradiol); EC 1.14.14.1 (Aromatase); K7Q1JQR04M (Dinoprostone); XXE1CET956 (Indomethacin)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170922
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170922
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170603
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1210/en.2017-00346


  9 / 1563 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28504672
[Au] Autor:Roberts TF; Hisey E; Tanaka M; Kearney MG; Chattree G; Yang CF; Shah NM; Mooney R
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA.
[Ti] Título:Identification of a motor-to-auditory pathway important for vocal learning.
[So] Source:Nat Neurosci;20(7):978-986, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1546-1726
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Learning to vocalize depends on the ability to adaptively modify the temporal and spectral features of vocal elements. Neurons that convey motor-related signals to the auditory system are theorized to facilitate vocal learning, but the identity and function of such neurons remain unknown. Here we identify a previously unknown neuron type in the songbird brain that transmits vocal motor signals to the auditory cortex. Genetically ablating these neurons in juveniles disrupted their ability to imitate features of an adult tutor's song. Ablating these neurons in adults had little effect on previously learned songs but interfered with their ability to adaptively modify the duration of vocal elements and largely prevented the degradation of songs' temporal features that is normally caused by deafening. These findings identify a motor to auditory circuit essential to vocal imitation and to the adaptive modification of vocal timing.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Córtex Auditivo/fisiologia
Vias Auditivas/fisiologia
Aprendizagem/fisiologia
Telencéfalo/fisiologia
Vocalização Animal/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Envelhecimento/fisiologia
Animais
Animais Geneticamente Modificados
Contagem de Células
Surdez/fisiopatologia
Tentilhões
Masculino
Vias Neurais/fisiologia
Técnicas de Rastreamento Neuroanatômico
Neurônios/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171115
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171115
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170516
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/nn.4563


  10 / 1563 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28497383
[Au] Autor:Varian-Ramos CW; Whitney M; Rice GW; Cristol DA
[Ad] Endereço:Institute for Integrative Bird Behavior Studies, Biology Department, College of William and Mary, P.O. Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA, 23187, USA. claire.ramos@csupueblo.edu.
[Ti] Título:Form of Dietary Methylmercury does not Affect Total Mercury Accumulation in the Tissues of Zebra Finch.
[So] Source:Bull Environ Contam Toxicol;99(1):1-8, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0800
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Exposure to mercury in humans, other mammals, and birds is primarily dietary, with mercury in the methylated form and bound to cysteine in the tissues of prey items. Yet dosing studies are generally carried out using methylmercury chloride. Here we tested whether the accumulation of total mercury in zebra finch blood, egg, muscle, liver, kidney or brain differed depending on whether dietary mercury was complexed with chloride or cysteine. We found no effect of form of mercury on tissue accumulation. Some previous studies have found lower accumulation of mercury in tissues of animals fed complexed mercury. Much remains to be understood about what happens to ingested mercury once it enters the intestines, but our results suggest that dietary studies using methylmercury chloride in birds will produce similar tissue accumulation levels to those using methylmercury cysteine.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dieta
Tentilhões/metabolismo
Mercúrio/metabolismo
Compostos de Metilmercúrio/metabolismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Cisteína/análogos & derivados
Cisteína/metabolismo
Rim
Fígado
Masculino
Músculos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Methylmercury Compounds); 12628-19-2 (methylmercury cysteine); FXS1BY2PGL (Mercury); K848JZ4886 (Cysteine); RWZ4L3O1X0 (methylmercuric chloride)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170718
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170718
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170513
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00128-017-2104-8



página 1 de 157 ir para página                         
   


Refinar a pesquisa
  Base de dados : MEDLINE Formulário avançado   

    Pesquisar no campo  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/OPAS/OMS - Centro Latino-Americano e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde