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[PMID]:28964732
[Au] Autor:Pérez JH; Meddle SL; Wingfield JC; Ramenofsky M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA. Electronic address: jonathan.perez@abdn.ac.uk.
[Ti] Título:Effects of thyroid hormone manipulation on pre-nuptial molt, luteinizing hormone and testicular growth in male white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leuchophrys gambelii).
[So] Source:Gen Comp Endocrinol;255:12-18, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1095-6840
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Most seasonal species rely on the annual change in day length as the primary cue to appropriately time major spring events such as pre-nuptial molt and breeding. Thyroid hormones are thought to be involved in the regulation of both of these spring life history stages. Here we investigated the effects of chemical inhibition of thyroid hormone production using methimazole, subsequently coupled with either triiodothyronine (T3) or thyroxine (T4) replacement, on the photostimulation of pre-nuptial molt and breeding in Gambel's white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leuchophrys gambelii). Suppression of thyroid hormones completely prevented pre-nuptial molt, while both T3 and T4 treatment restored normal patterns of molt in thyroid hormone-suppressed birds. Testicular recrudescence was blocked by methimazole, and restored by T4 but not T3, in contrast to previous findings demonstrating central action of T3 in the photostimulation of breeding. Methimazole and replacement treatments elevated plasma luteinizing hormone levels compared to controls. These data are partially consistent with existing theories on the role of thyroid hormones in the photostimulation of breeding, while highlighting the possibility of additional feedback pathways. Thus we suggest that regulation of the hypothalamic pituitary gonad axis that controls breeding may be more complex than previously considered.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Hormônio Luteinizante/sangue
Muda/efeitos dos fármacos
Pardais/sangue
Pardais/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Testículo/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Hormônios Tireóideos/farmacologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Masculino
Pardais/fisiologia
Testículo/anatomia & histologia
Testículo/efeitos dos fármacos
Tiroxina/sangue
Tri-Iodotironina/sangue
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Thyroid Hormones); 06LU7C9H1V (Triiodothyronine); 9002-67-9 (Luteinizing Hormone); Q51BO43MG4 (Thyroxine)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180216
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180216
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171002
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 769 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29281672
[Au] Autor:Rouffaer LO; Strubbe D; Teyssier A; Salleh Hudin N; Van den Abeele AM; Cox I; Haesendonck R; Delmée M; Haesebrouck F; Pasmans F; Lens L; Martel A
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium.
[Ti] Título:Effects of urbanization on host-pathogen interactions, using Yersinia in house sparrows as a model.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189509, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Urbanization strongly affects biodiversity, altering natural communities and often leading to a reduced species richness. Yet, despite its increasingly recognized importance, how urbanization impacts on the health of individual animals, wildlife populations and on disease ecology remains poorly understood. To test whether, and how, urbanization-driven ecosystem alterations influence pathogen dynamics and avian health, we use house sparrows (Passer domesticus) and Yersinia spp. (pathogenic for passerines) as a case study. Sparrows are granivorous urban exploiters, whose western European populations have declined over the past decades, especially in highly urbanized areas. We sampled 329 house sparrows originating from 36 populations along an urbanization gradient across Flanders (Belgium), and used isolation combined with 'matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization- time of flight mass spectrometry' (MALDI-TOF MS) and PCR methods for detecting the presence of different Yersinia species. Yersinia spp. were recovered from 57.43% of the sampled house sparrows, of which 4.06%, 53.30% and 69.54% were identified as Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. enterocolitica and other Yersinia species, respectively. Presence of Yersinia was related to the degree of urbanization, average daily temperatures and the community of granivorous birds present at sparrow capture locations. Body condition of suburban house sparrows was found to be higher compared to urban and rural house sparrows, but no relationships between sparrows' body condition and presence of Yersinia spp. were found. We conclude that two determinants of pathogen infection dynamics, body condition and pathogen occurrence, vary along an urbanization gradient, potentially mediating the impact of urbanization on avian health.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Interações Hospedeiro-Patógeno
Modelos Biológicos
Pardais/microbiologia
Urbanização
Yersinia/patogenicidade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase
Espectrometria de Massas por Ionização e Dessorção a Laser Assistida por Matriz
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180129
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180129
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171228
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189509


  3 / 769 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29261732
[Au] Autor:Titulaer M; Melgoza-Castillo A; Panjabi AO; Sanchez-Flores A; Martínez-Guerrero JH; Macías-Duarte A; Fernandez JA
[Ad] Endereço:Facultad de Zootecnia y Ecología, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico.
[Ti] Título:Molecular analysis of stomach contents reveals important grass seeds in the winter diet of Baird's and Grasshopper sparrows, two declining grassland bird species.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189695, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We analyzed the diet of Baird's Sparrow (Ammodramus bairdii) and Grasshopper Sparrow (A. savannarum) in three different sites and sampling periods across the Chihuahuan Desert in northern Mexico. DNA from seeds in regurgitated stomach contents was sequenced using NGS technology and identified with a barcoding approach using the P6 loop of the trnL intron as genetic marker. During each sampling period, we collected random soil samples to estimate seed availability in the soil seed bank. Due to the variability and size of the genetic marker, the resolution was limited to a family level resolution for taxonomic classification of seeds, but in several cases a genus level was achieved. Diets contained a high diversity of seeds but were dominated by a limited number of genera/families. Seeds from Panicoideae (from the genera Panicum, Setaria, Eriochloa, Botriochloa, and Hackelochloa) contributed for the largest part to the diets (53 ± 19%), followed by Bouteloua (10 ± 12%). Depending on the site and sampling period, other important seeds in the diets were Eragrostideae, Pleuraphis, Asteraceae, Verbena, and Amaranthus. The most abundant seeds were not always preferred. Aristida and Chloris were common in the soil seed bank but these seeds were avoided by both bird species. Baird's and Grasshopper sparrows did not differ in seed preferences. This work highlights the importance of range management practices that favor seed production of Panicoideae and Bouteloua grasses to enhance winter habitat use and survival of Baird's and Grasshopper sparrows in the Chihuahuan Desert.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dieta
Conteúdo Gastrointestinal
Pradaria
Estações do Ano
Sementes
Pardais/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Código de Barras de DNA Taxonômico
Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189695


  4 / 769 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28832614
[Au] Autor:Lattin CR; Stabile FA; Carson RE
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale Positron Emission Tomography Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Estradiol modulates neural response to conspecific and heterospecific song in female house sparrows: An in vivo positron emission tomography study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(8):e0182875, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Although there is growing evidence that estradiol modulates female perception of male sexual signals, relatively little research has focused on female auditory processing. We used in vivo 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to examine the neuronal effects of estradiol and conspecific song in female house sparrows (Passer domesticus). We assessed brain glucose metabolism, a measure of neuronal activity, in females with empty implants, estradiol implants, and empty implants ~1 month after estradiol implant removal. Females were exposed to conspecific or heterospecific songs immediately prior to imaging. The activity of brain regions involved in auditory perception did not differ between females with empty implants exposed to conspecific vs. heterospecific song, but neuronal activity was significantly reduced in females with estradiol implants exposed to heterospecific song. Furthermore, our within-individual design revealed that changes in brain activity due to high estradiol were actually greater several weeks after peak hormone exposure. Overall, this study demonstrates that PET imaging is a powerful tool for assessing large-scale changes in brain activity in living songbirds, and suggests that after breeding is done, specific environmental and physiological cues are necessary for estradiol-stimulated females to lose the selectivity they display in neural response to conspecific song.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comunicação Animal
Estradiol/fisiologia
Tomografia por Emissão de Pósitrons/métodos
Pardais/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
4TI98Z838E (Estradiol)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171019
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171019
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170824
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0182875


  5 / 769 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28651571
[Au] Autor:Drews A; Strandh M; Råberg L; Westerdahl H
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biology, Lund University, Ecology Building, 223 62, Lund, Sweden. anna.drews@biol.lu.se.
[Ti] Título:Expression and phylogenetic analyses reveal paralogous lineages of putatively classical and non-classical MHC-I genes in three sparrow species (Passer).
[So] Source:BMC Evol Biol;17(1):152, 2017 Jun 26.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2148
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) plays a central role in immunity and has been given considerable attention by evolutionary ecologists due to its associations with fitness-related traits. Songbirds have unusually high numbers of MHC class I (MHC-I) genes, but it is not known whether all are expressed and equally important for immune function. Classical MHC-I genes are highly expressed, polymorphic and present peptides to T-cells whereas non-classical MHC-I genes have lower expression, are more monomorphic and do not present peptides to T-cells. To get a better understanding of the highly duplicated MHC genes in songbirds, we studied gene expression in a phylogenetic framework in three species of sparrows (house sparrow, tree sparrow and Spanish sparrow), using high-throughput sequencing. We hypothesize that sparrows could have classical and non-classical genes, as previously indicated though never tested using gene expression. RESULTS: The phylogenetic analyses reveal two distinct types of MHC-I alleles among the three sparrow species, one with high and one with low level of polymorphism, thus resembling classical and non-classical genes, respectively. All individuals had both types of alleles, but there was copy number variation both within and among the sparrow species. However, the number of highly polymorphic alleles that were expressed did not vary between species, suggesting that the structural genomic variation is counterbalanced by conserved gene expression. Overall, 50% of the MHC-I alleles were expressed in sparrows. Expression of the highly polymorphic alleles was very variable, whereas the alleles with low polymorphism had uniformly low expression. Interestingly, within an individual only one or two alleles from the polymorphic genes were highly expressed, indicating that only a single copy of these is highly expressed. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, the phylogenetic reconstruction and the analyses of expression suggest that sparrows have both classical and non-classical MHC-I genes, and that the evolutionary origin of these genes predate the split of the three investigated sparrow species 7 million years ago. Because only the classical MHC-I genes are involved in antigen presentation, the function of different MHC-I genes should be considered in future ecological and evolutionary studies of MHC-I in sparrows and other songbirds.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Genes MHC Classe I
Pardais/classificação
Pardais/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Evolução Biológica
Variações do Número de Cópias de DNA
Evolução Molecular
Expressão Gênica
Filogenia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171103
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171103
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170628
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12862-017-0970-7


  6 / 769 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28613280
[Au] Autor:Silva CNS; McFarlane SE; Hagen IJ; Rönnegård L; Billing AM; Kvalnes T; Kemppainen P; Rønning B; Ringsby TH; Sæther BE; Qvarnström A; Ellegren H; Jensen H; Husby A
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biosciences, Metapopulation Research Centre, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
[Ti] Título:Insights into the genetic architecture of morphological traits in two passerine bird species.
[So] Source:Heredity (Edinb);119(3):197-205, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2540
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Knowledge about the underlying genetic architecture of phenotypic traits is needed to understand and predict evolutionary dynamics. The number of causal loci, magnitude of the effects and location in the genome are, however, still largely unknown. Here, we use genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from two large-scale data sets on house sparrows and collared flycatchers to examine the genetic architecture of different morphological traits (tarsus length, wing length, body mass, bill depth, bill length, total and visible badge size and white wing patches). Genomic heritabilities were estimated using relatedness calculated from SNPs. The proportion of variance captured by the SNPs (SNP-based heritability) was lower in house sparrows compared with collared flycatchers, as expected given marker density (6348 SNPs in house sparrows versus 38 689 SNPs in collared flycatchers). Indeed, after downsampling to similar SNP density and sample size, this estimate was no longer markedly different between species. Chromosome-partitioning analyses demonstrated that the proportion of variance explained by each chromosome was significantly positively related to the chromosome size for some traits and, generally, that larger chromosomes tended to explain proportionally more variation than smaller chromosomes. Finally, we found two genome-wide significant associations with very small-effect sizes. One SNP on chromosome 20 was associated with bill length in house sparrows and explained 1.2% of phenotypic variation (V ), and one SNP on chromosome 4 was associated with tarsus length in collared flycatchers (3% of V ). Although we cannot exclude the possibility of undetected large-effect loci, our results indicate a polygenic basis for morphological traits.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Genética Populacional
Padrões de Herança
Fenótipo
Aves Canoras/genética
Pardais/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Estudos de Associação Genética
Genótipo
Modelos Lineares
Masculino
Modelos Genéticos
Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170828
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170828
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170615
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/hdy.2017.29


  7 / 769 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28499964
[Au] Autor:Zhao Y; Li M; Sun Y; Wu W; Kou G; Guo L; Xing D; Wu Y; Li D; Zhao B
[Ad] Endereço:Key Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Hebei Province, College of Life Sciences, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Título:Life-history dependent relationships between body condition and immunity, between immunity indices in male Eurasian tree sparrows.
[So] Source:Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol;210:7-13, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1531-4332
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In free-living animals, recent evidence indicates that innate, and acquired, immunity varies with annual variation in the demand for, and availability of, food resources. However, little is known about how animals adjust the relationships between immunity and body condition, and between innate and acquired immunity to optimize survival over winter and reproductive success during the breeding stage. Here, we measured indices of body condition (size-corrected mass [SCM], and hematocrit [Hct]), constitutive innate immunity (plasma total complement hemolysis activity [CH ]) and acquired immunity (plasma immunoglobulin A [IgA]), plus heterophil/lymphocyte (H/L) ratios, in male Eurasian tree sparrows (Passer montanus) during the wintering and the breeding stages. We found that birds during the wintering stage had higher IgA levels than those from the breeding stage. Two indices of body condition were both negatively correlated with plasma CH activities, and positively with IgA levels in wintering birds, but this was not the case in the breeding birds. However, there was no correlation between CH activities and IgA levels in both stages. These results suggest that the relationships between body condition and immunity can vary across life-history stage, and there are no correlations between innate and acquired immunity independent of life-history stage, in male Eurasian tree sparrows. Therefore, body condition indices predict immunological state, especially during the non-breeding stage, which can be useful indicators of individual immunocompetences for understanding the variations in innate and acquired immunity in free-living animals.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Reprodução/imunologia
Pardais/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Imunidade Adaptativa
Animais
Peso Corporal
China
Hematócrito
Imunidade Inata
Imunoglobulina A/sangue
Masculino
Estações do Ano
Pardais/imunologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Immunoglobulin A)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170724
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170724
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170514
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 769 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28472052
[Au] Autor:Rojas Mora A; Meniri M; Gning O; Glauser G; Vallat A; Helfenstein F
[Ad] Endereço:Laboratory of Evolutionary Ecophysiology, Institute of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland.
[Ti] Título:Antioxidant allocation modulates sperm quality across changing social environments.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(5):e0176385, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In promiscuous species, male reproductive success depends on their ability to mate with fertile females and on the fertilizing ability of their sperm. In such species, theory predicts that, owing to a trade-off between pre- and post-copulatory reproductive traits, males with lesser access to females should increase resource investment into those sperm traits that enhance fertilization success-usually referred to as ejaculate quality. This prediction has been validated in several taxa, yet studies on the physiological mechanisms modulating ejaculate quality are lacking. Sperm cells are highly vulnerable to oxidative stress, which impairs male fertility. Therefore, males that better protect their sperm from oxidative stress are expected to achieve higher ejaculate quality. Based on theoretical expectations, and since social dominance is a major determinant of mating opportunity, we predicted that subordinate males should invest more into the antioxidant protection of their sperm in order to achieve higher ejaculate quality. We maintained 60 male and 60 female wild-caught house sparrows Passer domesticus in outdoor aviaries, where we experimentally manipulated male social status to test our predictions. We measured cellular oxidative stress and enzymatic antioxidant activity in blood and sperm both before and after manipulating social ranks. Before manipulating the social status, we found that ejaculate viability correlated with oxidative stress level in sperm, with dominant males producing more oxidized and less viable ejaculates. Further, males at the lower end of the hierarchy produced ejaculates of similar quality to those of dominant males, suggesting that restricted access to resources might limit male reproductive strategies. After experimentally manipulating the social status, males matched their ejaculate quality to their new rank, while increases in antioxidant investment into ejaculates paralleled increases in ejaculate viability. Oxidative stress has been proposed as a general constraint to the evolution of life histories. Our results highlight oxidative stress and strategic antioxidant allocation as important proximate physiological mechanisms underlying male reproductive strategies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Antioxidantes/metabolismo
Espermatozoides/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Masculino
Estresse Oxidativo
Comportamento Sexual Animal
Predomínio Social
Pardais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antioxidants)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170908
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170908
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0176385


  9 / 769 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28403152
[Au] Autor:McDermott ME; DeGroote LW
[Ad] Endereço:Powdermill Nature Reserve, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Rector, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Linking phenological events in migratory passerines with a changing climate: 50 years in the Laurel Highlands of Pennsylvania.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(4):e0174247, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Advanced timing of both seasonal migration and reproduction in birds has been strongly associated with a warming climate for many bird species. Phenological responses to climate linking these stages may ultimately impact fitness. We analyzed five decades of banding data from 17 migratory bird species to investigate 1) how spring arrival related to timing of breeding, 2) if the interval between arrival and breeding has changed with increasing spring temperatures, and 3) whether arrival timing or breeding timing best predicted local productivity. Four of 17 species, all mid- to long-distance migrants, hatched young earlier in years when migrants arrived earlier to the breeding grounds (~1:1 day advancement). The interval between arrival on breeding grounds and appearance of juveniles shortened with warmer spring temperatures for 12 species (1-6 days for every 1°C increase) and over time for seven species (1-8 days per decade), suggesting that some migratory passerines adapt to climate change by laying more quickly after arrival or reducing the time from laying to fledging. We found more support for the former, that the rate of reproductive advancement was higher than that for arrival in warm years. Timing of spring arrival and breeding were both poor predictors of avian productivity for most migrants analyzed. Nevertheless, we found evidence that fitness benefits may occur from shifts to earlier spring arrival for the multi-brooded Song Sparrow. Our results uniquely demonstrate that co-occurring avian species are phenologically plastic in their response to climate change on their breeding grounds. If migrants continue to show a weaker response to temperatures during migration than breeding, and the window between arrival and optimal breeding shortens further, biological constraints to plasticity may limit the ability of species to adapt successfully to future warming.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Migração Animal
Pardais/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Aquecimento Global
Pennsylvania
Estações do Ano
Comportamento Sexual Animal
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170504
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170504
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170414
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0174247


  10 / 769 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28286101
[Au] Autor:Sandoval L; Epperly KL; Klicka J; Mennill DJ
[Ad] Endereço:Escuela de Biología, Universidad de Costa Rica, CP-11501-2060, San Pedro, San José, Costa Rica; Department of Biological Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada. Electronic address: biosandoval@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Título:The biogeographic and evolutionary history of an endemic clade of Middle American sparrows: Melozone and Aimophila (Aves: Passerellidae).
[So] Source:Mol Phylogenet Evol;110:50-59, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9513
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The large number of endemic species in Middle America is frequently attributed to the interplay of geographical barriers and historical climatic changes in the region. This process promotes genetic divergence between populations, and given enough time, may yield new species. Animals that inhabit mid-elevation or highland habitats may be disproportionately affected in this way. Genetic analyses of animals in this region allow us to better understand how historical patterns of isolation have influenced the generation of new species in this biodiversity hotspot. We studied the biogeography and systematics of two closely related genera of sparrows (Passerellidae): Melozone and Aimophila. Collectively, this group is distributed from the southwestern United States and southward as far as central Costa Rica. We sampled 81 individuals of 8 Melozone and 2 Aimophila species, from 19 localities distributed throughout their ranges. We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships and time-calibrated species trees using multilocus sequence data comprised of one mitochondrial gene and five nuclear genes. We conducted an ancestral area reconstruction analysis to determine the probability of ancestral range at each divergent event. Despite analyzing six loci, we were unable to obtain a fully resolved phylogenetic tree. We recovered four main lineages: lineage 1 includes four Melozone species distributed north of Isthmus of Tehuantepec (M. albicollis, M. crissalis, M. aberti, M. fusca); lineage 2 includes three Melozone species distributed south of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec (M. biarcuata, M. cabanisi, M. leucotis); lineage 3 lineage consists of a single species endemic to the Pacific coast of Mexico (M. kieneri); and lineage 4 includes the more widely distributed sparrows in the genus Aimophila. Our analyses suggest that these genera probably originated during the late Miocene in the Madrean Highlands of southern Mexico. We identified dispersal as the prevalent cause of speciation in this clade with most lineages dispersing to their current distributions from southern Mexico either to the north following a developing and expanding Madro-Tertiary flora, or to the south across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. A similar pattern of dispersal from this biogeographic region has been reported in other taxa including fishes, reptiles, and birds. Our results reveal that the four lineages identified represent geographically coherent and ecologically similar assemblages of taxa. Finally, when our genetic results are considered, along with apparent differences in morphology and song, the allopatric forms M. b. cabanisi and M. l. occipitalis warrant recognition as biological species.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Filogenia
Filogeografia
Pardais/classificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Sequência de Bases
Calibragem
DNA Mitocondrial/genética
Genes Mitocondriais
Funções Verossimilhança
Software
Sudoeste dos Estados Unidos
Pardais/genética
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Mitochondrial)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170918
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170918
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170314
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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