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[PMID]:29211753
[Au] Autor:Gelin ML; Branch LC; Thornton DH; Novaro AJ; Gould MJ; Caragiulo A
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, and School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Response of pumas (Puma concolor) to migration of their primary prey in Patagonia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0188877, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Large-scale ungulate migrations result in changes in prey availability for top predators and, as a consequence, can alter predator behavior. Migration may include entire populations of prey species, but often prey populations exhibit partial migration with some individuals remaining resident and others migrating. Interactions of migratory prey and predators have been documented in North America and some other parts of the world, but are poorly studied in South America. We examined the response of pumas (Puma concolor) to seasonal migration of guanacos (Lama guanicoe) in La Payunia Reserve in northern Patagonia Argentina, which is the site of the longest known ungulate migration in South America. More than 15,000 guanacos migrate seasonally in this landscape, and some guanacos also are resident year-round. We hypothesized that pumas would respond to the guanaco migration by consuming more alternative prey rather than migrating with guanacos because of the territoriality of pumas and availability of alternative prey throughout the year at this site. To determine whether pumas moved seasonally with the guanacos, we conducted camera trapping in the summer and winter range of guanacos across both seasons and estimated density of pumas with spatial mark-resight (SMR) models. Also, we analyzed puma scats to assess changes in prey consumption in response to guanaco migration. Density estimates of pumas did not change significantly in the winter and summer range of guanacos when guanacos migrated to and from these areas, indicating that pumas do not follow the migration of guanacos. Pumas also did not consume more alternative native prey or livestock when guanaco availability was lower, but rather fed primarily on guanacos and some alternative prey during all seasons. Alternative prey were most common in the diet during summer when guanacos also were abundant on the summer range. The response of pumas to the migration of guanacos differs from sites in the western North America where entire prey populations migrate and pumas migrate with their prey or switch to more abundant prey when their primary prey migrates.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Migração Animal
Puma/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Argentina
Dieta
Comportamento Predatório
Estações do Ano
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171229
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171229
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188877


  2 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29020087
[Au] Autor:Wang Y; Smith JA; Wilmers CC
[Ad] Endereço:San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory, 524 Valley Way, Milpitas, CA, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Residential development alters behavior, movement, and energetics in an apex predator, the puma.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0184687, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Human development strongly influences large carnivore survival and persistence globally. Behavior changes are often the first measureable responses to human disturbances, and can have ramifications on animal populations and ecological communities. We investigated how a large carnivore responds to anthropogenic disturbances by measuring activity, movement behavior, and energetics in pumas along a housing density gradient. We used log-linear analyses to examine how habitat, time of day, and proximity to housing influenced the activity patterns of both male and female pumas in the Santa Cruz Mountains. We used spatial GPS location data in combination with Overall Dynamic Body Acceleration measurements recorded by onboard accelerometers to quantify how development density affected the average distances traveled and energy expended by pumas. Pumas responded to development differently depending on the time of day; at night, they were generally more active and moved further when they were in developed areas, but these relationships were not consistent during the day. Higher nighttime activity in developed areas increased daily caloric expenditure by 10.1% for females and 11.6% for males, resulting in increases of 3.4 and 4.0 deer prey required annually by females and males respectively. Our results support that pumas have higher energetic costs and resource requirements in human-dominated habitats due to human-induced behavioral change. Increased energetic costs for pumas are likely to have ramifications on prey species and exacerbate human-wildlife conflict, especially as exurban growth continues. Future conservation work should consider the consequences of behavioral shifts on animal energetics, individual fitness, and population viability.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ecossistema
Metabolismo Energético/fisiologia
Movimento
Comportamento Predatório/fisiologia
Puma/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
California
Intervalos de Confiança
Feminino
Florestas
Modelos Lineares
Masculino
Probabilidade
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171031
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171031
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171012
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0184687


  3 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28757384
[Au] Autor:Jeon BN; Yoon JH; Han D; Kim MK; Kim Y; Choi SH; Song J; Kim KS; Kim K; Hur MW
[Ad] Endereço:Brain Korea 21 Plus Project for Medical Science, Severance Biomedical Research Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yonsei University School of Medicine, 50-1, Yonsei-Ro, SeoDaeMoon-Ku, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Título:ZNF509S1 downregulates PUMA by inhibiting p53K382 acetylation and p53-DNA binding.
[So] Source:Biochim Biophys Acta;1860(9):962-972, 2017 09.
[Is] ISSN:0006-3002
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Expression of the POK family protein ZNF509L, and -its S1 isoform, is induced by p53 upon exposure to genotoxic stress. Due to alternative splicing of the ZNF509 primary transcript, ZNF509S1 lacks the 6 zinc-fingers and C-terminus of ZNF509L, resulting in only one zinc-finger. ZNF509L and -S1 inhibit cell proliferation by activating p21/CDKN1A and RB transcription, respectively. When cells are exposed to severe DNA damage, p53 activates PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) transcription. Interestingly, apoptosis due to transcriptional activation of PUMA by p53 is attenuated by ZNF509S1. Thus we investigated the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the transcriptional attenuation and anti-apoptotic effects of ZNF509S1. We show that ZNF509S1 modulation of p53 activity is important in PUMA gene transcription by modulating post-translational modification of p53 by p300. ZNF509S1 directly interacts with p53 and inhibits p300-mediated acetylation of p53 lysine K382, with deacetylation of p53 K382 leading to decreased DNA binding at the p53 response element 1 of the PUMA promoter. ZNF509S1 may play a role not only in cell cycle arrest, by activating RB expression, but also in rescuing cells from apoptotic death by repressing PUMA expression in cells exposed to severe DNA damage.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/metabolismo
DNA/metabolismo
Regulação para Baixo/fisiologia
Puma/metabolismo
Proteína Supressora de Tumor p53/metabolismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Acetilação
Animais
Apoptose/fisiologia
Proteínas Reguladoras de Apoptose/metabolismo
Linhagem Celular
Linhagem Celular Tumoral
Proliferação Celular/fisiologia
Inibidor de Quinase Dependente de Ciclina p21/metabolismo
Dano ao DNA/fisiologia
Proteína p300 Associada a E1A
Células HCT116
Células HEK293
Seres Humanos
Regiões Promotoras Genéticas/fisiologia
Ligação Proteica/fisiologia
Processamento de Proteína Pós-Traducional/fisiologia
Ativação Transcricional/fisiologia
Dedos de Zinco/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins); 0 (Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21); 0 (DNA-Binding Proteins); 0 (TP53 protein, human); 0 (Tumor Suppressor Protein p53); 0 (ZNF509 protein, human); 9007-49-2 (DNA); EC 2.3.1.48 (E1A-Associated p300 Protein); EC 2.3.1.48 (EP300 protein, human)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171103
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171103
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170801
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  4 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28609466
[Au] Autor:Zeller KA; Vickers TW; Ernest HB; Boyce WM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Multi-level, multi-scale resource selection functions and resistance surfaces for conservation planning: Pumas as a case study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(6):e0179570, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The importance of examining multiple hierarchical levels when modeling resource use for wildlife has been acknowledged for decades. Multi-level resource selection functions have recently been promoted as a method to synthesize resource use across nested organizational levels into a single predictive surface. Analyzing multiple scales of selection within each hierarchical level further strengthens multi-level resource selection functions. We extend this multi-level, multi-scale framework to modeling resistance for wildlife by combining multi-scale resistance surfaces from two data types, genetic and movement. Resistance estimation has typically been conducted with one of these data types, or compared between the two. However, we contend it is not an either/or issue and that resistance may be better-modeled using a combination of resistance surfaces that represent processes at different hierarchical levels. Resistance surfaces estimated from genetic data characterize temporally broad-scale dispersal and successful breeding over generations, whereas resistance surfaces estimated from movement data represent fine-scale travel and contextualized movement decisions. We used telemetry and genetic data from a long-term study on pumas (Puma concolor) in a highly developed landscape in southern California to develop a multi-level, multi-scale resource selection function and a multi-level, multi-scale resistance surface. We used these multi-level, multi-scale surfaces to identify resource use patches and resistant kernel corridors. Across levels, we found puma avoided urban, agricultural areas, and roads and preferred riparian areas and more rugged terrain. For other landscape features, selection differed among levels, as did the scales of selection for each feature. With these results, we developed a conservation plan for one of the most isolated puma populations in the U.S. Our approach captured a wide spectrum of ecological relationships for a population, resulted in effective conservation planning, and can be readily applied to other wildlife species.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Animais Selvagens/fisiologia
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais/métodos
Ecossistema
Puma/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Algoritmos
Animais
Animais Selvagens/genética
California
Geografia
Atividades Humanas
Seres Humanos
Desequilíbrio de Ligação
Repetições de Microssatélites/genética
Modelos Teóricos
Dinâmica Populacional
Comportamento Predatório/fisiologia
Puma/genética
Telemetria/métodos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170925
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170925
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170614
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0179570


  5 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28273159
[Au] Autor:Alibhai S; Jewell Z; Evans J
[Ad] Endereço:Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:The challenge of monitoring elusive large carnivores: An accurate and cost-effective tool to identify and sex pumas (Puma concolor) from footprints.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(3):e0172065, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Acquiring reliable data on large felid populations is crucial for effective conservation and management. However, large felids, typically solitary, elusive and nocturnal, are difficult to survey. Tagging and following individuals with VHF or GPS technology is the standard approach, but costs are high and these methodologies can compromise animal welfare. Such limitations can restrict the use of these techniques at population or landscape levels. In this paper we describe a robust technique to identify and sex individual pumas from footprints. We used a standardized image collection protocol to collect a reference database of 535 footprints from 35 captive pumas over 10 facilities; 19 females (300 footprints) and 16 males (235 footprints), ranging in age from 1-20 yrs. Images were processed in JMP data visualization software, generating one hundred and twenty three measurements from each footprint. Data were analyzed using a customized model based on a pairwise trail comparison using robust cross-validated discriminant analysis with a Ward's clustering method. Classification accuracy was consistently > 90% for individuals, and for the correct classification of footprints within trails, and > 99% for sex classification. The technique has the potential to greatly augment the methods available for studying puma and other elusive felids, and is amenable to both citizen-science and opportunistic/local community data collection efforts, particularly as the data collection protocol is inexpensive and intuitive.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Puma/fisiologia
Análise para Determinação do Sexo/economia
Análise para Determinação do Sexo/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Algoritmos
Animais
Análise por Conglomerados
Feminino

Masculino
Fotografia
Densidade Demográfica
Vigilância da População
Puma/anatomia & histologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170830
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170830
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170309
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0172065


  6 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28204600
[Au] Autor:Ochoa A; Onorato DP; Fitak RR; Roelke-Parker ME; Culver M
[Ad] Endereço:From the School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (Ochoa and Culver); Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Naples, FL 34114 (Onorato); Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (Fitak);
[Ti] Título:Evolutionary and Functional Mitogenomics Associated With the Genetic Restoration of the Florida Panther.
[So] Source:J Hered;108(4):449-455, 2017 Jun 01.
[Is] ISSN:1465-7333
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Florida panthers are endangered pumas that currently persist in reduced patches of habitat in South Florida, USA. We performed mitogenome reference-based assemblies for most parental lines of the admixed Florida panthers that resulted from the introduction of female Texas pumas into South Florida in 1995. With the addition of 2 puma mitogenomes, we characterized 174 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across 12 individuals. We defined 5 haplotypes (Pco1-Pco5), one of which (Pco1) had a geographic origin exclusive to Costa Rica and Panama and was possibly introduced into the Everglades National Park, Florida, prior to 1995. Haplotype Pco2 was native to Florida. Haplotypes Pco3 and Pco4 were exclusive to Texas, whereas haplotype Pco5 had an undetermined geographic origin. Phylogenetic inference suggests that haplotypes Pco1-Pco4 diverged ~202000 (95% HPDI = 83000-345000) years ago and that haplotypes Pco2-Pco4 diverged ~61000 (95% HPDI = 9000-127000) years ago. These results are congruent with a south-to-north continental expansion and with a recent North American colonization by pumas. Furthermore, pumas may have migrated from Texas to Florida no earlier than ~44000 (95% HPDI = 2000-98000) years ago. Synonymous mutations presented a greater mean substitution rate than other mitochondrial functional regions: nonsynonymous mutations, tRNAs, rRNAs, and control region. Similarly, all protein-coding genes were under predominant negative selection constraints. We directly and indirectly assessed the presence of potential deleterious SNPs in the ND2 and ND5 genes in Florida panthers prior to and as a consequence of the introduction of Texas pumas. Screenings for such variants are recommended in extant Florida panthers.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Genoma Mitocondrial
Puma/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Teorema de Bayes
Espécies em Perigo de Extinção
Evolução Molecular
Feminino
Florida
Haplótipos
Masculino
Filogenia
Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
Texas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170907
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170907
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170217
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jhered/esx015


  7 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28024874
[Au] Autor:Aghashani A; Kim AS; Kass PH; Verstraete FJM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, USA.
[Ti] Título:Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the California Mountain Lion (Puma concolor couguar).
[So] Source:J Comp Pathol;156(2-3):251-263, 2017 Feb - Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1532-3129
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Skulls from 91 California mountain lions (Puma concolor couguar) were examined macroscopically and radiographically. The majority of the skulls were from young adult animals (57.1%). The skull specimens were from 42 male (46.1%) and 34 female (37.4%) animals, while the gender was unknown for the remainder. The majority (94.5%) of teeth were present for examination. Only 11 teeth were identified as absent congenitally; five of these teeth were maxillary first molar teeth and three were maxillary second premolar teeth. Abnormal tooth morphology was identified in 3.5% of teeth. The most common abnormality in tooth form was abnormally large crowns of the maxillary first molar teeth. Teeth with an abnormal number of roots were uncommon (n = 21). Ninety-one teeth were found to have an abnormal number of roots, most often two-rooted maxillary first molar teeth instead of the expected one root. The most prevalent dental lesions found in the California mountain lion were attrition/abrasion (93.4%), tooth fractures (80.2%) and periodontitis (38.5%). Less common dental lesions were tooth resorption (n = 32 teeth) and endodontal disease (n = 29 teeth).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Puma
Doenças Estomatognáticas/veterinária
Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular/veterinária
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Masculino
Articulação Temporomandibular/patologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170821
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170821
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161228
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28003486
[Au] Autor:Lee J; Malmberg JL; Wood BA; Hladky S; Troyer R; Roelke M; Cunningham M; McBride R; Vickers W; Boyce W; Boydston E; Serieys L; Riley S; Crooks K; VandeWoude S
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.
[Ti] Título:Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Cross-Species Transmission: Implications for Emergence of New Lentiviral Infections.
[So] Source:J Virol;91(5), 2017 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1098-5514
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Owing to a complex history of host-parasite coevolution, lentiviruses exhibit a high degree of species specificity. Given the well-documented viral archeology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) emergence following human exposures to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), an understanding of processes that promote successful cross-species lentiviral transmissions is highly relevant. We previously reported natural cross-species transmission of a subtype of feline immunodeficiency virus, puma lentivirus A (PLVA), between bobcats ( ) and mountain lions ( ) for a small number of animals in California and Florida. In this study, we investigate host-specific selection pressures, within-host viral fitness, and inter- versus intraspecies transmission patterns among a larger collection of PLV isolates from free-ranging bobcats and mountain lions. Analyses of proviral and viral RNA levels demonstrate that PLVA fitness is severely restricted in mountain lions compared to that in bobcats. We document evidence of diversifying selection in three of six PLVA genomes from mountain lions, but we did not detect selection among 20 PLVA isolates from bobcats. These findings support the hypothesis that PLVA is a bobcat-adapted virus which is less fit in mountain lions and under intense selection pressure in the novel host. Ancestral reconstruction of transmission events reveals that intraspecific PLVA transmission has occurred among panthers ( ) in Florida following the initial cross-species infection from bobcats. In contrast, interspecific transmission from bobcats to mountain lions predominates in California. These findings document outcomes of cross-species lentiviral transmission events among felids that compare to the emergence of HIV from nonhuman primates. Cross-species transmission episodes can be singular, dead-end events or can result in viral replication and spread in the new species. The factors that determine which outcome will occur are complex, and the risk of new virus emergence is therefore difficult to predict. We used molecular techniques to evaluate the transmission, fitness, and adaptation of puma lentivirus A (PLVA) between bobcats and mountain lions in two geographic regions. Our findings illustrate that mountain lion exposure to PLVA is relatively common but does not routinely result in communicable infections in the new host. This is attributed to efficient species barriers that largely prevent lentiviral adaptation. However, the evolutionary capacity for lentiviruses to adapt to novel environments may ultimately overcome host restriction mechanisms over time and under certain ecological circumstances. This phenomenon provides a unique opportunity to examine cross-species transmission events leading to new lentiviral emergence.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doenças do Gato/virologia
Vírus da Imunodeficiência Felina/fisiologia
Lynx/virologia
Puma/virologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
California/epidemiologia
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia
Doenças do Gato/transmissão
Gatos
Feminino
Florida/epidemiologia
Masculino
Filogenia
Polimorfismo Genético
Seleção Genética
Especificidade da Espécie
Tropismo Viral
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170814
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170814
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161223
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27582037
[Au] Autor:Reichard MV; Logan K; Criffield M; Thomas JE; Paritte JM; Messerly DM; Interisano M; Marucci G; Pozio E
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Veterinary Pathobiology,Center for Veterinary Health Sciences,Oklahoma State University,250 McElroy Hall,Stillwater,OK 74078,USA.
[Ti] Título:The occurrence of Trichinella species in the cougar Puma concolor couguar from the state of Colorado and other regions of North and South America.
[So] Source:J Helminthol;91(3):320-325, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1475-2697
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Trichinella species are zoonotic nematodes that infect wild carnivores and omnivores throughout the world. We examined the prevalence and species of Trichinella infections in cougars (Puma concolor couguar) from Colorado, United States. Tongues from cougars were examined by pepsin-HCl artificial digestion to detect Trichinella spp. larvae. The species or genotype of individual worms was identified by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Trichinella spp. larvae were detected in 17 of 39 cougars (43.6% (28.7-59.5%)). Five of the cougars (12.8%) were infected with T. murrelli, 3 (7.7%) were infected with T. pseudospiralis, and 1 (2.6%) had Trichinella genotype T6. Trichinella spp. larvae from eight cougars were not identified at the species level, due to degraded DNA. The high prevalence of Trichinella spp. in cougars from Colorado and reports of the parasite in other populations of Puma spp. suggest that this large predator is a key mammalian reservoir.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Puma/parasitologia
Trichinella/isolamento & purificação
Triquinelose/veterinária
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Américas/epidemiologia
Animais
Larva/classificação
Larva/genética
Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase Multiplex
Prevalência
Língua/parasitologia
Trichinella/classificação
Trichinella/genética
Triquinelose/epidemiologia
Triquinelose/parasitologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170407
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170407
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160902
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0022149X16000262


  10 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28080904
[Au] Autor:DiSalvo AR; Reilly CM; Wiggans KT; Woods LW; Wack RF; Clifford DL
[Ti] Título:PHOTORECEPTOR DEGENERATION IN A MOUNTAIN LION CUB (PUMA CONCOLOR).
[So] Source:J Zoo Wildl Med;47(4):1077-1080, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1042-7260
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:An orphaned 4-mo-old female mountain lion cub ( Puma concolor ) was captured along the coastline in Montaña de Oro State Park in Los Osos, California, USA. Following suspicion that the cub was visually impaired, ophthalmic examination revealed diffuse bilateral retinal atrophy. Due to a poor prognosis, humane euthanasia was elected. Necropsy and histopathological findings were consistent with photoreceptor degeneration. Based on the cub's signalment, history, and histopathology, a genetic or nutritional etiology was suspected, with the former etiology more strongly supported. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of photoreceptor degeneration in a wild felid and should be considered in cases of blindness.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Células Fotorreceptoras de Vertebrados/patologia
Puma
Doenças Retinianas/veterinária
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Doenças Retinianas/patologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1703
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170113
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1638/2015-0305.1



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