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[PMID]:29272275
[Au] Autor:Seely E; Osborne RW; Koski K; Larson S
[Ad] Endereço:The Whale Museum, Friday Harbor, Washington, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Soundwatch: Eighteen years of monitoring whale watch vessel activities in the Salish Sea.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189764, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The Soundwatch Boater Education Program is a vessel monitoring and public education outreach program. Soundwatch has been run by The Whale Museum (TWM) during the whale watch season (May through September) in the Haro Strait Region of the Central Salish Sea since 1993. Data collection has been in a consistent manner since 1998 and is presented here. The program compiles data on vessel types and vessel interactions with marine mammals with a focus on the Southern Resident killer whale (SRKW), Orcinas orca, which was listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 2005. The primary goal of the Soundwatch program is to reduce vessel disturbance to SRKWs and other marine wildlife through the education of boaters on regional, local and federal guidelines and regulations and the systematic monitoring of vessel activities around cetaceans. Since 1998, the number of active commercial whale watching vessels has increased over time; ranging from a low of 63 in 1999, to a high of 96 in 2015. In addition, the number of vessel incidents or violation of regulations and guidelines has also increased; ranging from a low of 398 in 1998 to a high of 2621 in 2012. Soundwatch collected data on 23 incident types, some remaining the same over the 18-year data set and some changing over time. The most common incidents over the 18 years were "Within 880 m of Lime Kiln" and "Crossing the path of whales". The numbers of people kayaking near whales also significantly increased since 2004 with the incident "kayaks spread out" with a significantly increasing trend making it difficult for whales to avoid vessels. These results suggest a need for further outreach for effective education and enforcement of whale watching guidelines and regulations in the Central Salish Sea.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conservação dos Recursos Naturais/métodos
Espécies em Perigo de Extinção
Navios
Orca
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171223
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189764


  2 / 175 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28695252
[Au] Autor:Jarvela Rosenberger AL; MacDuffee M; Rosenberger AGJ; Ross PS
[Ad] Endereço:Raincoast Conservation Foundation, P.O. Box 2429, Sidney, BC, V8L 3Y3, Canada.
[Ti] Título:Oil Spills and Marine Mammals in British Columbia, Canada: Development and Application of a Risk-Based Conceptual Framework.
[So] Source:Arch Environ Contam Toxicol;73(1):131-153, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0703
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Marine mammals are inherently vulnerable to oil spills. We developed a conceptual framework to evaluate the impacts of potential oil exposure on marine mammals and applied it to 21 species inhabiting coastal British Columbia (BC), Canada. Oil spill vulnerability was determined by examining both the likelihood of species-specific (individual) oil exposure and the consequent likelihood of population-level effects. Oil exposure pathways, ecology, and physiological characteristics were first used to assign species-specific vulnerability rankings. Baleen whales were found to be highly vulnerable due to blowhole breathing, surface filter feeding, and invertebrate prey. Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) were ranked as highly vulnerable due to their time spent at the ocean surface, dense pelage, and benthic feeding techniques. Species-specific vulnerabilities were considered to estimate the likelihood of population-level effects occurring after oil exposure. Killer whale (Orcinus orca) populations were deemed at highest risk due to small population sizes, complex social structure, long lives, slow reproductive turnover, and dietary specialization. Finally, we related the species-specific and population-level vulnerabilities. In BC, vulnerability was deemed highest for Northern and Southern Resident killer whales and sea otters, followed by Bigg's killer whales and Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus). Our findings challenge the typical "indicator species" approach routinely used and underscore the need to examine marine mammals at a species and population level for risk-based oil spill predictions. This conceptual framework can be combined with spill probabilities and volumes to develop more robust risk assessments and may be applied elsewhere to identify vulnerability themes for marine mammals.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Monitoramento Ambiental/métodos
Lontras/fisiologia
Poluição por Petróleo
Orca/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Colúmbia Britânica
Ecologia
Cadeia Alimentar
Invertebrados
Medição de Risco
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170719
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170719
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170712
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00244-017-0408-7


  3 / 175 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28666015
[Au] Autor:Jourdain E; Vongraven D; Bisther A; Karoliussen R
[Ad] Endereço:Norwegian Orca Survey, Andenes, Norway.
[Ti] Título:First longitudinal study of seal-feeding killer whales (Orcinus orca) in Norwegian coastal waters.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(6):e0180099, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Killer whales (Orcinus orca) have been documented preying on either fish or marine mammals in several regions, suggesting that this odontocete species has the ability to specialize on different types of prey. Off Norway, killer whales have been shown to rely on the Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) as a main prey resource. Infrequent observations have revealed seals as an additional component of their diet, yet the extent of predation on marine mammals has remained largely unknown. Here, we present the findings of 29 years of photographic and observational data on seal-feeding killer whale groups identified in Norwegian coastal waters. Four groups have been observed preying and feeding on seals over several years, taking both harbor (Phoca vitulina) and grey (Halichoerus grypus) seals. These stable groups are shown to adopt small group sizes, were typically observed in near-shore areas and were not encountered on herring wintering grounds. Behavioral and social traits adopted by these groups are similar to those of pinniped-feeding killer whales from other regions. The potential ecological reasons and the extent of such prey specializations are discussed.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Phoca
Comportamento Predatório
Focas Verdadeiras
Orca/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Estudos Longitudinais
Noruega
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171002
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171002
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170701
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0180099


  4 / 175 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28662095
[Au] Autor:Wasser SK; Lundin JI; Ayres K; Seely E; Giles D; Balcomb K; Hempelmann J; Parsons K; Booth R
[Ad] Endereço:Center for Conservation Biology, Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Population growth is limited by nutritional impacts on pregnancy success in endangered Southern Resident killer whales (Orcinus orca).
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(6):e0179824, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The Southern Resident killer whale population (Orcinus orca) was listed as endangered in 2005 and shows little sign of recovery. These fish eating whales feed primarily on endangered Chinook salmon. Population growth is constrained by low offspring production for the number of reproductive females in the population. Lack of prey, increased toxins and vessel disturbance have been listed as potential causes of the whale's decline, but partitioning these pressures has been difficult. We validated and applied temporal measures of progesterone and testosterone metabolites to assess occurrence, stage and health of pregnancy from genotyped killer whale feces collected using detection dogs. Thyroid and glucocorticoid hormone metabolites were measured from these same samples to assess physiological stress. These methods enabled us to assess pregnancy occurrence and failure as well as how pregnancy success was temporally impacted by nutritional and other stressors, between 2008 and 2014. Up to 69% of all detectable pregnancies were unsuccessful; of these, up to 33% failed relatively late in gestation or immediately post-partum, when the cost is especially high. Low availability of Chinook salmon appears to be an important stressor among these fish-eating whales as well as a significant cause of late pregnancy failure, including unobserved perinatal loss. However, release of lipophilic toxicants during fat metabolism in the nutritionally deprived animals may also provide a contributor to these cumulative effects. Results point to the importance of promoting Chinook salmon recovery to enhance population growth of Southern Resident killer whales. The physiological measures used in this study can also be used to monitor the success of actions aimed at promoting adaptive management of this important apex predator to the Pacific Northwest.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Espécies em Perigo de Extinção
Estado Nutricional
Orca/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Crescimento Demográfico
Gravidez
Reprodução
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170928
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170928
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170630
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0179824


  5 / 175 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28298467
[Au] Autor:Williams TM; Kendall TL; Richter BP; Ribeiro-French CR; John JS; Odell KL; Losch BA; Feuerbach DA; Stamper MA
[Ad] Endereço:Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Laboratory, University of California, Santa Cruz, 115 MacAlister Way, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA williams@biology.ucsc.edu.
[Ti] Título:Swimming and diving energetics in dolphins: a stroke-by-stroke analysis for predicting the cost of flight responses in wild odontocetes.
[So] Source:J Exp Biol;220(Pt 6):1135-1145, 2017 Mar 15.
[Is] ISSN:1477-9145
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Exponential increases in hydrodynamic drag and physical exertion occur when swimmers move quickly through water, and underlie the preference for relatively slow routine speeds by marine mammals regardless of body size. Because of this and the need to balance limited oxygen stores when submerged, flight (escape) responses may be especially challenging for this group. To examine this, we used open-flow respirometry to measure the energetic cost of producing a swimming stroke during different levels of exercise in bottlenose dolphins ( ). These data were then used to model the energetic cost of high-speed escape responses by other odontocetes ranging in mass from 42 to 2738 kg. The total cost per stroke during routine swimming by dolphins, 3.31±0.20 J kg stroke , was doubled during maximal aerobic performance. A comparative analysis of locomotor costs (LC; in J kg stroke ), representing the cost of moving the flukes, revealed that LC during routine swimming increased with body mass ( ) for odontocetes according to LC=1.46±0.0005 ; a separate relationship described LC during high-speed stroking. Using these relationships, we found that continuous stroking coupled with reduced glide time in response to oceanic noise resulted in a 30.5% increase in metabolic rate in the beaked whale, a deep-diving odontocete considered especially sensitive to disturbance. By integrating energetics with swimming behavior and dive characteristics, this study demonstrates the physiological consequences of oceanic noise on diving mammals, and provides a powerful tool for predicting the biological significance of escape responses by cetaceans facing anthropogenic disturbances.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Golfinho Nariz-de-Garrafa/fisiologia
Mergulho
Metabolismo Energético
Natação
Orca/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Masculino
Oxigênio/metabolismo
Consumo de Oxigênio
Condicionamento Físico Animal
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
S88TT14065 (Oxygen)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170824
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170824
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170317
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1242/jeb.154245


  6 / 175 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28273531
[Au] Autor:Desforges JP; Eulaers I; Periard L; Sonne C; Dietz R; Letcher RJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Bioscience, Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, Frederiksborgvej 399, PO Box 358, DK-4000, Roskilde, Denmark.
[Ti] Título:A rapid analytical method to quantify complex organohalogen contaminant mixtures in large samples of high lipid mammalian tissues.
[So] Source:Chemosphere;176:243-248, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1298
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In vitro investigations of the health impact of individual chemical compounds have traditionally been used in risk assessments. However, humans and wildlife are exposed to a plethora of potentially harmful chemicals, including organohalogen contaminants (OHCs). An alternative exposure approach to individual or simple mixtures of synthetic OHCs is to isolate the complex mixture present in free-ranging wildlife, often non-destructively sampled from lipid rich adipose. High concentration stock volumes required for in vitro investigations do, however, pose a great analytical challenge to extract sufficient amounts of complex OHC cocktails. Here we describe a novel method to easily, rapidly and efficiently extract an environmentally accumulated and therefore relevant contaminant cocktail from large (10-50 g) marine mammal blubber samples. We demonstrate that lipid freeze-filtration with acetonitrile removes up to 97% of blubber lipids, with minimal effect on the efficiency of OHC recovery. Sample extracts after freeze-filtration were further processed to remove residual trace lipids via high-pressure gel permeation chromatography and solid phase extraction. Average recoveries of OHCs from triplicate analysis of killer whale (Orcinus orca), polar bear (Ursus maritimus) and pilot whale (Globicephala spp.) blubber standard reference material (NIST SRM-1945) ranged from 68 to 80%, 54-92% and 58-145%, respectively, for C-enriched internal standards of six polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, 16 organochlorine pesticides and four brominated flame retardants. This approach to rapidly generate OHC mixtures shows great potential for experimental exposures using complex contaminant mixtures, research or monitoring driven contaminant quantification in biological samples, as well as the untargeted identification of emerging contaminants.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Tecido Adiposo/química
Monitoramento Ambiental/métodos
Poluentes Ambientais/análise
Hidrocarbonetos Clorados/análise
Bifenilos Policlorados/análise
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Técnicas de Química Analítica/métodos
Retardadores de Chama/análise
Lipídeos/isolamento & purificação
Mamíferos
Praguicidas/análise
Ursidae
Orca
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Environmental Pollutants); 0 (Flame Retardants); 0 (Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated); 0 (Lipids); 0 (Pesticides); DFC2HB4I0K (Polychlorinated Biphenyls)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170428
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170428
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170309
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 175 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28126344
[Au] Autor:Robeck TR; Steinman KJ; O'Brien JK
[Ad] Endereço:SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment, Inc., SeaWorld and Busch Gardens Reproductive Research Center, San Diego, CA 92109, USA. Electronic address: Todd.Robeck@SeaWorld.com.
[Ti] Título:Characterization and longitudinal monitoring of serum androgens and glucocorticoids during normal pregnancy in the killer whale (Orcinus orca).
[So] Source:Gen Comp Endocrinol;247:116-129, 2017 Jun 01.
[Is] ISSN:1095-6840
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The secretory patterns of testosterone (T), androstenedione (A4), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), cortisol (C), and corticosterone (Co) were characterized throughout 28 normal pregnancies until two-months post-partum in eleven killer whales. Effects of fetal sex, dam parity or age, and season were evaluated across either day post-conception (DPC), stage of pregnancy (PRE, EARLY, MID, LATE, POST) or indexed month post-conception (IMPC) using a mixed model linear regression with animal ID and pregnancy number as the random variables. Across DPC, DHEA, A4 and T concentrations were affected (P<0.05) by season, with highest concentrations during spring (DHEA, A4, & T) and summer (A4) as compared to the fall. A significant effect of parity on androgen production was observed only for DHEA, with multiparous females having higher (P=0.01) concentrations than nulliparous females. All three androgens significantly increased with each successive pregnancy stage and IMPC with peak concentrations occurring during IMPC 10 (DHEA), 13 (A4) and 14 (T), respectively. Cortisol was affected by season (P=0.03) with highest concentrations being detected during the months of fall, while Co was only affected by parity (P=0.003) with significant increases observed for primiparous females as compared to nulliparous females. Cortisol and Co concentrations peaked (P<0.05) during IMPC 17 (i.e., the month prior to parturition). The C to Co ratio during pregnancy was 7.4 to 1, indicating that cortisol is the major circulating glucocorticoid studied to date in pregnant killer whales. The significant increase in concentrations of maternal androgens throughout pregnancy, which were unrelated to fetal sex, indicates that they play an important role during killer whale fetal development.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Androgênios/sangue
Glucocorticoides/sangue
Orca/sangue
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Androstenodiona/sangue
Animais
Corticosterona/sangue
Desidroepiandrosterona/sangue
Feminino
Feto/metabolismo
Hidrocortisona/sangue
Masculino
Parto/sangue
Gravidez
Testosterona/sangue
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Androgens); 0 (Glucocorticoids); 3XMK78S47O (Testosterone); 409J2J96VR (Androstenedione); 459AG36T1B (Dehydroepiandrosterone); W980KJ009P (Corticosterone); WI4X0X7BPJ (Hydrocortisone)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171009
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171009
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170128
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 175 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27870149
[Au] Autor:Guarino S; Hill HM; Sigman J
[Ad] Endereço:St. Mary's University, San Antonio, Texas.
[Ti] Título:Development of sociality and emergence of independence in a killer whale (Orcinus orca) calf from birth to 36 months.
[So] Source:Zoo Biol;36(1):11-20, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2361
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Dolphin calves spend most of their time swimming with their mother immediately after birth. As they mature, the calves become increasingly independent, and begin to interact more often with other calves, juveniles, and sub-adults. For bottlenose dolphin calves, sociality is related to maternal behaviors. Unfortunately, much less is known about the development of sociality and emergence of independence for killer whale calves. The purpose of this study was to examine the developmental changes in social behaviors and solitary activities of a killer whale calf across a 36-month period. Focal follow video recordings of a mother-calf pair housed at SeaWorld San Antonio were collected 2-6 times a day for 5-15 min at 6-month intervals. Using a sample of randomly selected video recordings at each month, developmental changes in swims and social interactions with her mother, swims and social interactions with non-maternal partners, and solitary activities (e.g., solitary swims, solitary play) were observed across the months. The calf spent most of her time swimming with the mother across the 36-month period. The time the calf socialized with her mother was greater than the time she socialized with others at each month. Besides her mother, the calf socialized more often with the other adult female compared to adult males. As the calf matured, the increase in the time she spent socializing with adult killer whales other than the mother corresponded with an increase in the rate and time spent in solitary play. The developmental trends of sociality and emerging independence replicate research conducted with calves of other dolphin species. Zoo Biol. 36:11-20, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Comportamento Social
Orca/crescimento & desenvolvimento
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Animais de Zoológico
Feminino
Masculino
Comportamento Materno/fisiologia
Orca/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1702
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170221
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170221
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/zoo.21338


  9 / 175 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27119362
[Au] Autor:Wright A; Scadeng M; Stec D; Dubowitz R; Ridgway S; Leger JS
[Ad] Endereço:Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. awright@ucsd.edu.
[Ti] Título:Neuroanatomy of the killer whale (Orcinus orca): a magnetic resonance imaging investigation of structure with insights on function and evolution.
[So] Source:Brain Struct Funct;222(1):417-436, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1863-2661
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The evolutionary process of adaptation to an obligatory aquatic existence dramatically modified cetacean brain structure and function. The brain of the killer whale (Orcinus orca) may be the largest of all taxa supporting a panoply of cognitive, sensory, and sensorimotor abilities. Despite this, examination of the O. orca brain has been limited in scope resulting in significant deficits in knowledge concerning its structure and function. The present study aims to describe the neural organization and potential function of the O. orca brain while linking these traits to potential evolutionary drivers. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for volumetric analysis and three-dimensional reconstruction of an in situ postmortem O. orca brain. Measurements were determined for cortical gray and cerebral white matter, subcortical nuclei, cerebellar gray and white matter, corpus callosum, hippocampi, superior and inferior colliculi, and neuroendocrine structures. With cerebral volume comprising 81.51 % of the total brain volume, this O. orca brain is one of the most corticalized mammalian brains studied to date. O. orca and other delphinoid cetaceans exhibit isometric scaling of cerebral white matter with increasing brain size, a trait that violates an otherwise evolutionarily conserved cerebral scaling law. Using comparative neurobiology, it is argued that the divergent cerebral morphology of delphinoid cetaceans compared to other mammalian taxa may have evolved in response to the sensorimotor demands of the aquatic environment. Furthermore, selective pressures associated with the evolution of echolocation and unihemispheric sleep are implicated in substructure morphology and function. This neuroanatomical dataset, heretofore absent from the literature, provides important quantitative data to test hypotheses regarding brain structure, function, and evolution within Cetacea and across Mammalia.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Encéfalo/anatomia & histologia
Encéfalo/fisiologia
Orca/anatomia & histologia
Orca/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Substância Cinzenta/anatomia & histologia
Substância Cinzenta/fisiologia
Imagem Tridimensional
Imagem por Ressonância Magnética
Masculino
Substância Branca/anatomia & histologia
Substância Branca/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171016
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171016
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160428
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00429-016-1225-x


  10 / 175 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27923044
[Au] Autor:Wellard R; Lightbody K; Fouda L; Blewitt M; Riggs D; Erbe C
[Ad] Endereço:Centre for Marine Science & Technology, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
[Ti] Título:Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Predation on Beaked Whales (Mesoplodon spp.) in the Bremer Sub-Basin, Western Australia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;11(12):e0166670, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Observations of killer whales (Orcinus orca) feeding on the remains of beaked whales have been previously documented; however, to date, there has been no published account of killer whales actively preying upon beaked whales. This article describes the first field observations of killer whales interacting with, hunting and preying upon beaked whales (Mesoplodon spp.) on four separate occasions during 2014, 2015 and 2016 in the Bremer Sub-Basin, off the south coast of Western Australia.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Predatório
Orca/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Alimentar
Austrália Ocidental
Baleias
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170615
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170615
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0166670



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