Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : B01.050.150.900.649.313.968 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 652 [refinar]
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[PMID]:29405683
[Au] Autor:Tsapko NV
[Ti] Título:[Ticks (Acari, ixodidae) of the North Caucasus: Species diversity, host-parasite relationships].
[So] Source:Parazitologiia;51(2):104-20, 2017 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0031-1847
[Cp] País de publicação:Russia (Federation)
[La] Idioma:rus
[Ab] Resumo:Biological diversity of ixodid tick fauna of the North Caucasus is analyzed. On the whole, 38 tick species are represented in the fauna of the North Caucasus. Their distribution within the region, biotopic features, and host-parasite relationships of different stages of ontogenesis are considered.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Interações Hospedeiro-Parasita
Ixodidae/fisiologia
Filogenia
Infestações por Carrapato/epidemiologia
Infestações por Carrapato/veterinária
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Biodiversidade
Aves/classificação
Aves/parasitologia
Carnívoros/classificação
Carnívoros/parasitologia
Ouriços-Cacheiros/classificação
Ouriços-Cacheiros/parasitologia
Especificidade de Hospedeiro
Seres Humanos
Ixodidae/classificação
Lagomorpha/classificação
Lagomorpha/parasitologia
Roedores/classificação
Roedores/parasitologia
Ruminantes/classificação
Ruminantes/parasitologia
Federação Russa/epidemiologia
Especificidade da Espécie
Infestações por Carrapato/parasitologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180222
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180222
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 652 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29210235
[Au] Autor:Millar CI; Heckman K; Swanston C; Schmidt K; Westfall RD; Delany DL
[Ti] Título:Radiocarbon dating of American pika fecal pellets provides insights into population extirpations and climate refugia.
[So] Source:Ecol Appl;24(7):1748-68, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1051-0761
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The American pika (Ochotona princeps) has become a species of concern for its sensitivity to warm temperatures and potential vulnerability to global warming. We explored the value of radiocarbon dating of fecal pellets to address questions of population persistence and timing of site extirpation. Carbon was extracted from pellets collected at 43 locations in the western Great Basin, USA, including three known occupied sites and 40 sites of uncertain status at range margins or where previous studies indicated the species is vulnerable. We resolved calibrated dates with high precision (within several years), most of which fell in the period of the mid-late 20th century bomb curve. The two-sided nature of the bomb curve renders far- and near-side dates of equal probability, which are separated by one to four decades. We document methods for narrowing resolution to one age range, including stratigraphic analysis of vegetation collected from pika haypiles. No evidence was found for biases in atmospheric 14C levels due to fossil-derived or industrial CO2 contamination. Radiocarbon dating indicated that pellets can persist for >59 years; known occupied sites resolved contemporary dates. Using combined evidence from field observations and radiocarbon dating, and the Bodie Mountains as an example, we propose a historical biogeographic scenario for pikas in minor Great Basin mountain ranges adjacent to major cordillera, wherein historical climate variability led to cycles of extirpation and recolonization during alternating cool and warm centuries. Using this model to inform future dynamics for small ranges in biogeographic settings similar to the Bodie Mountains in California, extirpation of pikas appears highly likely under directional warming trends projected for the next century, even while populations in extensive cordillera (e.g., Sierra Nevada, Rocky Mountains, Cascade Range) are likely to remain viable due to extensive, diverse habitat and high connectivity.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Distribuição Animal
Clima
Lagomorpha/fisiologia
Datação Radiométrica/veterinária
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
California
Nevada
Oregon
Dinâmica Populacional
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180108
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180108
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171207
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  3 / 652 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28857023
[Au] Autor:Meng X; Wang Y; Lu S; Lai XH; Jin D; Yang J; Xu J
[Ad] Endereço:1​State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, Beijing 102206,
[Ti] Título:Actinomyces gaoshouyii sp. nov., isolated from plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae).
[So] Source:Int J Syst Evol Microbiol;67(9):3363-3368, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1466-5034
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Two strains (pika_113T and pika_114) of a previously undescribed Actinomyces-like bacterium were recovered from the intestinal contents of plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) on the Tibet-Qinghai Plateau, China. Results from biochemical characterization indicated that the two strains were phenotypically homogeneous and distinct from other previously described species of the genus Actinomyces. Based on the comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences and genome analysis, the bacteria were determined to be a hitherto unknown subline within the genus Actinomyces, being most closely related to type strains of Actinomyces denticolens and Actinomyces timonensis with a respective 97.2 and 97.1 % similarity in their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that pika_113T was well separated from any other recognized species of the genus Actinomyces and within the cluster with A. denticolens and A. timonensis. The genome of strain pika_113T displayed less than 42 % relatedness in DNA-DNA hybridization with all the available genomes of existing species of the genus Actinomyces in the NCBI database. Collectively, based on the phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic analyses results, we propose the novel isolates as representatives of Actinomyces gaoshouyii sp. nov. The type strain of Actinomyces gaoshouyii is pika_113T (=CGMCC 4.7372T=DSM 104049T), with a genomic DNA G+C content of 71 mol%.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Actinomyces/classificação
Intestinos/microbiologia
Lagomorpha/microbiologia
Filogenia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Actinomyces/genética
Actinomyces/isolamento & purificação
Animais
Técnicas de Tipagem Bacteriana
DNA Bacteriano/genética
Hibridização de Ácido Nucleico
RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética
Análise de Sequência de DNA
Tibet
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Bacterial); 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170920
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170920
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170901
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1099/ijsem.0.002119


  4 / 652 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28854268
[Au] Autor:Stewart JAE; Wright DH; Heckman KA
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Apparent climate-mediated loss and fragmentation of core habitat of the American pika in the Northern Sierra Nevada, California, USA.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(8):e0181834, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Contemporary climate change has been widely documented as the apparent cause of range contraction at the edge of many species distributions but documentation of climate change as a cause of extirpation and fragmentation of the interior of a species' core habitat has been lacking. Here, we report the extirpation of the American pika (Ochotona princeps), a temperature-sensitive small mammal, from a 165-km2 area located within its core habitat in California's Sierra Nevada mountains. While sites surrounding the area still maintain pikas, radiocarbon analyses of pika fecal pellets recovered within this area indicate that former patch occupancy ranges from before 1955, the beginning of the atmospheric spike in radiocarbon associated with above ground atomic bomb testing, to c. 1991. Despite an abundance of suitable rocky habitat climate warming appears to have precipitated their demise. Weather station data reveal a 1.9°C rise in local temperature and a significant decline in snowpack over the period of record, 1910-2015, pushing pika habitat into increasingly tenuous climate conditions during the period of extirpation. This is among the first accounts of an apparently climate-mediated, modern extirpation of a species from an interior portion of its geographic distribution, resulting in habitat fragmentation, and is the largest area yet reported for a modern-era pika extirpation. Our finding provides empirical support to model projections, indicating that even core areas of species habitat are vulnerable to climate change within a timeframe of decades.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Mudança Climática
Ecossistema
Espécies em Perigo de Extinção
Lagomorpha
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Distribuição Animal
Animais
California
Radioisótopos de Carbono/análise
Lagomorpha/fisiologia
Temperatura Ambiente
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Carbon Radioisotopes)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171013
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171013
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170831
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0181834


  5 / 652 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28419257
[Au] Autor:Foley P; Roth T; Foley J; Ray C
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biological Sciences, Sacramento State University, Sacramento, CA 95819.
[Ti] Título:Rodent-Pika Parasite Spillover in Western North America.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;54(5):1251-1257, 2017 Sep 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Competition during the Cenozoic expansion of the Rodentia may have contributed to ecological niche reduction of pikas, which are now increasingly under threat as their habitat degrades under global climate change, while some rodents expand their ranges and overlap with pikas. Range overlap carries the possibility of disease spillover. Contemporary North American pikas are cold-adapted and relegated primarily to alpine environments where they subsist on relatively low-quality herbaceous diet. Yet their evolutionary ancestors were distributed geographically even into the subtropics. Here we examine historical and contemporary records of fleas on pikas (Ochotona princeps) from sites at different elevations in the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Northwest. We calculated indices of diversity from each site and spillover fraction, i.e., the proportion of fleas on pikas that have a preference for rodents. Across this range there are four pika specialist flea species, with no more than two of these per site, and 18 characteristically rodent flea species. Diversity is greatest in the Pacific Northwest and lowest in Montana. Rodent flea spillover onto pikas declines with elevation in the Rocky Mountains. These data provide evidence that rodents and pikas interact enough to allow considerable parasite spillover, and which could be exacerbated as pikas are increasingly stressed by climate change at lower elevations some rodent species expand up-elevation in the face of increasing global warming. With global climate change, both biotic and abiotic niche shrinkage demand our attention.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Especificidade de Hospedeiro
Lagomorpha/parasitologia
Roedores/parasitologia
Sifonápteros
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Colorado
Montana
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170928
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170928
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170419
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjx085


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[PMID]:28406565
[Au] Autor:Tague RG
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Geography and Anthropology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
[Ti] Título:Sacral Variability in Tailless Species: Homo sapiens and Ochotona princeps.
[So] Source:Anat Rec (Hoboken);300(5):798-809, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1932-8494
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Homo sapiens is variable in number of sacral vertebrae, and this variability can lead to obstetrical complication. This study uses the comparative method to test the hypothesis that sacral variability in H. sapiens is associated with absence of a tail. Three species of lagomorphs are studied: Ochotona princeps (N = 271), which is tailless, and Lepus californicus (N = 212) and Sylvilagus audubonii (N = 206), which have tails. Results show that O. princeps has (1) higher diversity index for number of sacral vertebrae (0.49) compared to L. californicus (0.25) and S. audubonii (0.26) and (2) significantly higher percentage of individuals with the species-specific nonmodal number of sacral vertebrae (43.9%) compared to L. californicus (14.2%) and S. audubonii (15.5%). Comparison of H. sapiens (N = 1,030; individuals of age 20-39 years) with O. princeps shows similarities between the species in diversity index (also 0.49 in H. sapiens) and percentage of individuals with nonmodal number of sacral vertebrae (37.3% in H. sapiens). Homeotic transformation best explains the results. H. sapiens and O. princeps show propensity for caudal shift at the sacral-caudal border (i.e., homeotic transformation of the first caudal vertebra to a sacral vertebra). Caudal and cranial shift among presacral vertebrae increases or decreases this propensity, respectively. Increase in number of sacral vertebrae in H. sapiens by homeotic transformation reduces pelvic outlet capacity and can be obstetrically hazardous. Anat Rec, 300:798-809, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Lebres/anatomia & histologia
Lagomorpha/anatomia & histologia
Sacro/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Evolução Biológica
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170724
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170724
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170414
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ar.23555


  7 / 652 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28301495
[Au] Autor:McMahon LA; Rachlow JL; Shipley LA; Forbey JS; Johnson TR; Olsoy PJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Fish and Wildlife Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Evaluation of micro-GPS receivers for tracking small-bodied mammals.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(3):e0173185, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:GPS telemetry markedly enhances the temporal and spatial resolution of animal location data, and recent advances in micro-GPS receivers permit their deployment on small mammals. One such technological advance, snapshot technology, allows for improved battery life by reducing the time to first fix via postponing recovery of satellite ephemeris (satellite location) data and processing of locations. However, no previous work has employed snapshot technology for small, terrestrial mammals. We evaluated performance of two types of micro-GPS (< 20 g) receivers (traditional and snapshot) on a small, semi-fossorial lagomorph, the pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), to understand how GPS errors might influence fine-scale assessments of space use and habitat selection. During stationary tests, microtopography (i.e., burrows) and satellite geometry had the largest influence on GPS fix success rate (FSR) and location error (LE). There was no difference between FSR while animals wore the GPS collars above ground (determined via light sensors) and FSR generated during stationary, above-ground trials, suggesting that animal behavior other than burrowing did not markedly influence micro-GPS errors. In our study, traditional micro-GPS receivers demonstrated similar FSR and LE to snapshot receivers, however, snapshot receivers operated inconsistently due to battery and software failures. In contrast, the initial traditional receivers deployed on animals experienced some breakages, but a modified collar design consistently functioned as expected. If such problems were resolved, snapshot technology could reduce the tradeoff between fix interval and battery life that occurs with traditional micro-GPS receivers. Our results suggest that micro-GPS receivers are capable of addressing questions about space use and resource selection by small mammals, but that additional techniques might be needed to identify use of habitat structures (e.g., burrows, tree cavities, rock crevices) that could affect micro-GPS performance and bias study results.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Migração Animal
Sistemas de Informação Geográfica
Lagomorpha/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Idaho
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170907
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170907
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170317
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0173185


  8 / 652 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27990566
[Au] Autor:Yan Y; Gu JY; Yuan ZC; Chen XY; Li ZK; Lei J; Hu BL; Yan LP; Xing G; Liao M; Zhou JY
[Ad] Endereço:Key Laboratory of Animal Virology of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou, 310058, Zhejiang, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Título:Genetic characterization of H9N2 avian influenza virus in plateau pikas in the Qinghai Lake region of China.
[So] Source:Arch Virol;162(4):1025-1029, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1432-8798
[Cp] País de publicação:Austria
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Qinghai Lake is a major migratory-bird breeding site that has experienced several highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (AIV) epizootics. Plateau pikas (Ochotona curzoniae) have previously been implicated in the ecology of avian influenza virus in this region. We first isolated an H9N2 AIV (A/Pika/Menyuan/01/2008) from plateau pikas between November 2008 and October 2009. Sequence analysis showed that the A/Pika/Menyuan/01/2008 AIV was closely related to the H9N2 AIV strain (A/Turkey/Wisconsin/ 1/1966). Our findings suggested that plateau pikas may contribute to AIV epidemiology in the Qinghai Lake region.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doenças das Aves/transmissão
Reservatórios de Doenças/veterinária
Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H9N2/genética
Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H9N2/isolamento & purificação
Lagomorpha/virologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Animais Selvagens/virologia
Doenças das Aves/virologia
Embrião de Galinha
China
Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia
Vetores de Doenças
Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H9N2/classificação
Lagos
Filogenia
Proteínas Virais/genética
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Viral Proteins)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1703
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170315
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170315
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161220
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00705-016-3176-1


  9 / 652 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27859293
[Au] Autor:Pokines JT; Sussman R; Gough M; Ralston C; McLeod E; Brun K; Kearns A; Moore TL
[Ad] Endereço:Forensic Anthropology Program, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, L1004, Boston, MA, 02118.
[Ti] Título:Taphonomic Analysis of Rodentia and Lagomorpha Bone Gnawing Based Upon Incisor Size.
[So] Source:J Forensic Sci;62(1):50-66, 2017 01.
[Is] ISSN:1556-4029
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Rodent and lagomorph species have a worldwide distribution and have the potential to alter remains from forensic cases by gnawing soft tissue and bones and through dispersal. The present research compiled metric data on the incisors widths of all rodent and lagomorph species whose ranges include Massachusetts, U.S.A., to compare their sizes to gnawing damage found on 17 cases of human remains from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Boston, MA. Data on gnawing maximum striation widths also were collected from live laboratory, zoo, and wild specimens. Gnawing damage on the forensic cases could be attributed only to a particular size class of rodent or lagomorph, and identification to a particular species based on gnawing damage alone may be possible only in relatively rare cases. Multiple species examined here have broad distribution ranges, so their taphonomic alterations may impact bones from forensic cases throughout large portions of North America.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Osso e Ossos/patologia
Comportamento Alimentar
Incisivo/anatomia & histologia
Lagomorpha
Roedores
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Animais de Laboratório
Animais Selvagens
Animais de Zoológico
Antropologia Forense
Seres Humanos
Massachusetts
Mudanças Depois da Morte
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171011
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171011
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161119
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/1556-4029.13254


  10 / 652 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27838310
[Au] Autor:Koju NP; He K; Chalise MK; Ray C; Chen Z; Zhang B; Wan T; Chen S; Jiang X
[Ad] Endereço:State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223, China; Kunming College of Life Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, China; Central Department of Zoology, Tribhuvan University, K
[Ti] Título:Multilocus approaches reveal underestimated species diversity and inter-specific gene flow in pikas (Ochotona) from southwestern China.
[So] Source:Mol Phylogenet Evol;107:239-245, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9513
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The phylogeny of living pikas (Ochotonidae, Ochotona) remains obscure, and pika species diversity in southwestern China has never been well explored. In this study, 96 tissue samples from 11 valid species in three classified subgenera (Pika, Ochotona and Conothoa) from 23 locations were characterized using multilocus sequences of 7031bp. Two mitochondrial (CYT B and COI) and five nuclear gene segments (RAG1, RAG2, TTN, OXAIL and IL1RAPL1) were sequenced. We analysed evolutionary histories using maximum likelihood (RAxML) and Bayesian analyses (BEAST), and we also used molecular species delimitation analyses (BPP) to explore species diversity. Our study supported O. syrinx (O. huangensis) as a distinct clade from all named subgenera. Relationships among subgenera were not fully resolved, which may be due to a rapid diversification in the middle Miocene (∼13.90Ma). Conflicting gene trees implied mitochondrial introgression from O. cansus to O. curzoniae. We uncovered three cryptic species from Shaanxi, Sichuan and Yunnan with strong support, suggesting an underestimation of species diversity in the "sky-island" mountains of southwest China.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fluxo Gênico
Loci Gênicos
Variação Genética
Lagomorpha/classificação
Lagomorpha/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Sequência de Bases
Teorema de Bayes
China
Geografia
Filogenia
Especificidade da Espécie
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171002
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171002
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161114
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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