Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : B01.050.150.900.649.313.988 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 10472 [refinar]
Mostrando: 1 .. 10   no formato [Detalhado]

página 1 de 1048 ir para página                         

  1 / 10472 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29244015
[Au] Autor:Crosby RW; Williams TL
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Computer Science, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC, USA. crosbyrw@cofc.edu.
[Ti] Título:Fast algorithms for computing phylogenetic divergence time.
[So] Source:BMC Bioinformatics;18(Suppl 15):514, 2017 Dec 06.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2105
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The inference of species divergence time is a key step in most phylogenetic studies. Methods have been available for the last ten years to perform the inference, but the performance of the methods does not yet scale well to studies with hundreds of taxa and thousands of DNA base pairs. For example a study of 349 primate taxa was estimated to require over 9 months of processing time. In this work, we present a new algorithm, AncestralAge, that significantly improves the performance of the divergence time process. RESULTS: As part of AncestralAge, we demonstrate a new method for the computation of phylogenetic likelihood and our experiments show a 90% improvement in likelihood computation time on the aforementioned dataset of 349 primates taxa with over 60,000 DNA base pairs. Additionally, we show that our new method for the computation of the Bayesian prior on node ages reduces the running time for this computation on the 349 taxa dataset by 99%. CONCLUSION: Through the use of these new algorithms we open up the ability to perform divergence time inference on large phylogenetic studies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Algoritmos
Biologia Computacional/métodos
Filogenia
Análise de Sequência de DNA/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Primatas/classificação
Primatas/genética
Software
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180307
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180307
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12859-017-1916-1


  2 / 10472 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29380888
[Au] Autor:Génin F; Masters JC
[Ad] Endereço:African Primate Initiative for Ecology and Speciation (APIES), Earth Stewardship Science Research Institute, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa.
[Ti] Título:Sharing the burden: A neutral approach to socioecological theory.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;165 Suppl 65:90-103, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: The socioecological model (SEM) is a popular collection of controversial models purporting to explain mating systems in terms of ecological and social parameters. Despite its guise of objectivity, several of its hypotheses assume Victorian gender stereotypes of active, competing males heedlessly sowing their seeds, and cautious, passive females, imprisoned by greater costs of reproduction and their consequent resourceߚdependence. METHODS: We enter this debate by taking a previously neglected explanatory approach borrowed from species theory. According to the Recognition Concept of sexual species, the unit of reproductive success/fitness is irreducible to fewer than two integrated subparts (minimally a male and a female). Phyletic changes in mating systems logically effect changes in fertilization systems, leading to reproductive isolation. We take our primary assumption of the average equivalence of female and male contributions to successful reproduction from the writings of the natural philosopher, Antoinette Blackwell. RESULTS: We revisit the SEM with its contradictions and extrapolations, and develop a genderߚneutral alternative hypothesis termed SpecificߚMate Contact (SMC), centered on two fundamental mating strategies: sexual animals may behave as synchronous mateߚattractors or asynchronous mateߚseekers, generating four possible mating system combinations (monogamy: two attractors; promiscuity: two seekers; polygyny: male attractor and female seeker; polyandry: female attractor and male seeker). CONCLUSIONS: Our approach predicts all known primate mating systems using a neutral (nonߚsexist) principle. The approach is also neutral in the sense that it does not invoke either competition or cooperation: fertilization success is considered a posteriori and males and females are coߚadapted to this end rather than cognitively cooperative.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Antropologia
Preferência de Acasalamento Animal/fisiologia
Primatas/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Teorema de Bayes
Evolução Biológica
Ecologia
Feminino
Aptidão Genética
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Casamento
Modelos Teóricos
Sociologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23383


  3 / 10472 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29380887
[Au] Autor:Young JW; Shapiro LJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED), Rootstown, Ohio, 44272.
[Ti] Título:Developments in development: What have we learned from primate locomotor ontogeny?
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;165 Suppl 65:37-71, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The importance of locomotion to evolutionary fitness has led to extensive study of primate locomotor behavior, morphology and ecology. Most previous research has focused on adult primates, but in the last few decades, increased attention to locomotor development has provided new insights toward our broader understanding of primate adaptation and evolution. Here, we review the contributions of this body of work from three basic perspectives. First, we assess possible determinants on the timing of locomotor independence, an important life history event. Significant influences on timing of locomotor independence include adult female body mass, age at weaning, and especially relative brain size, a significant predictor of other primate life history variables. Additionally, we found significant phylogenetic differences in the timing of locomotor independence, even accounting for these influences. Second, we discuss how structural aspects of primate growth may enhance the locomotor performance and safety of young primates, despite their inherent neuromotor and musculoskeletal limitations. For example, compared to adults, growing primates have greater muscle mechanical advantage, greater bone robusticity, and larger extremities with relatively long digits. Third, focusing on primate quadrupedalism, we provide examples that illustrate how ontogenetic transitions in morphology and locomotion can serve as a model system for testing broader principles underlying primate locomotor biomechanics. This approach has led to a better understanding of the key features that contribute to primates' stride characteristics, gait patterns, limb force distribution, and limb postures. We have learned a great deal from the study of locomotor ontogeny, but there is much left to explore. We conclude by offering guidelines for future research, both in the laboratory and the field.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fenômenos Biomecânicos/fisiologia
Marcha/fisiologia
Locomoção/fisiologia
Primatas/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antropologia Física
Osso e Ossos/fisiologia
Feminino
Força da Mão/fisiologia
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Filogenia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23388


  4 / 10472 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29380883
[Au] Autor:Allan ATL; Hill RA
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Dawson Building, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:What have we been looking at? A call for consistency in studies of primate vigilance.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;165 Suppl 65:4-22, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Vigilance functions to detect threats. In primates, these threats emerge from both predators and conspecifics, but a host of other social, demographic, and ecological factors have been shown to influence primate vigilance patterns. The primate vigilance literature is thus characterized by considerable variation in findings, with inconsistent or contradictory results reported not only across different species but also within species and populations across studies. Some of this variation could emerge from fundamental differences in the methods employed, making comparisons across species and groups challenging. Furthermore, identifying consistent behavioral markers for the state of vigilance appears to have proved challenging in primates, leading to a range of definitions being developed. Deviation at this level leads directly into concomitant variation at the level of sampling methodologies. As a result, the primate vigilance literature currently presents a diverse series of approaches to exploring subtly different behaviors and phenomena. This review calls for a greater consistency in studying vigilance, with the aim of encouraging future research to follow similar principles leading to more comparable results. Identifying whether an animal is in a vigilant state is challenging for most field researchers; identifying and recording a more general behavior of "looking" should though be more achievable. Experimental approaches could then be employed to understand the compatibility "looking" has with predator detection (and other threats) in individual study systems. The outcome of this approach will allow researchers to understand the key determinants of looking in their study groups and explore threat detection probabilities given an individual or group's relative level of looking.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Antropologia Física/métodos
Antropologia Física/normas
Comportamento Predatório/fisiologia
Primatas/fisiologia
Projetos de Pesquisa/normas
Predomínio Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23381


  5 / 10472 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29380886
[Au] Autor:Rogers J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Molecular and Human Genetics and Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030.
[Ti] Título:The behavioral genetics of nonhuman primates: Status and prospects.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;165 Suppl 65:23-36, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The complexity and diversity of primate behavior have long attracted the attention of ethologists, psychologists, behavioral ecologists, and neuroscientists. Recent studies have advanced our understanding of the nature of genetic influences on differences in behavior among individuals within species. A number of analyses have focused on the genetic analysis of behavioral reactions to specific experimental tests, providing estimates of the degree of genetic control over reactivity, and beginning to identify the genes involved. Substantial progress is also being made in identifying genetic factors that influence the structure and function of the primate brain. Most of the published studies on these topics have examined either cercopithecines or chimpanzees, though a few studies have addressed these questions in other primate species. One potentially important line of research is beginning to identify the epigenetic processes that influence primate behavior, thus revealing specific cellular and molecular mechanisms by which environmental experiences can influence gene expression or gene function relevant to behavior. This review summarizes many of these studies of non-human primate behavioral genetics. The primary focus is on analyses that address the nature of the genes and genetic processes that affect differences in behavior among individuals within non-human primate species. Analyses of between species differences and potential avenues for future research are also discussed.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal
Encéfalo
Primatas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Encéfalo/anatomia & histologia
Encéfalo/fisiologia
Epigênese Genética/genética
Epigênese Genética/fisiologia
Feminino
Genética Comportamental
Relações Interpessoais
Masculino
Primatas/anatomia & histologia
Primatas/genética
Primatas/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23384


  6 / 10472 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29300759
[Au] Autor:Antoneli F; Passos FM; Lopes LR; Briones MRS
[Ad] Endereço:Laboratório de Genômica Evolutiva e Biocomplexidade, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Pedro de Toledo, UNIFESP, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Título:A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for the molecular clock based on Bayesian ensembles of phylogenies.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190826, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Divergence date estimates are central to understand evolutionary processes and depend, in the case of molecular phylogenies, on tests of molecular clocks. Here we propose two non-parametric tests of strict and relaxed molecular clocks built upon a framework that uses the empirical cumulative distribution (ECD) of branch lengths obtained from an ensemble of Bayesian trees and well known non-parametric (one-sample and two-sample) Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) goodness-of-fit test. In the strict clock case, the method consists in using the one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test to directly test if the phylogeny is clock-like, in other words, if it follows a Poisson law. The ECD is computed from the discretized branch lengths and the parameter λ of the expected Poisson distribution is calculated as the average branch length over the ensemble of trees. To compensate for the auto-correlation in the ensemble of trees and pseudo-replication we take advantage of thinning and effective sample size, two features provided by Bayesian inference MCMC samplers. Finally, it is observed that tree topologies with very long or very short branches lead to Poisson mixtures and in this case we propose the use of the two-sample KS test with samples from two continuous branch length distributions, one obtained from an ensemble of clock-constrained trees and the other from an ensemble of unconstrained trees. Moreover, in this second form the test can also be applied to test for relaxed clock models. The use of a statistically equivalent ensemble of phylogenies to obtain the branch lengths ECD, instead of one consensus tree, yields considerable reduction of the effects of small sample size and provides a gain of power.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Molecular
Modelos Genéticos
Filogenia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ascomicetos/classificação
Ascomicetos/genética
Teorema de Bayes
Simulação por Computador
Ciclo-Oxigenase 1/genética
DNA/genética
Bases de Dados Genéticas
Produtos do Gene env/genética
Seres Humanos
Lentivirus/classificação
Lentivirus/genética
Distribuição de Poisson
Primatas/classificação
Primatas/genética
Proteínas/genética
Estatísticas não Paramétricas
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Gene Products, env); 0 (Proteins); 9007-49-2 (DNA); EC 1.14.99.1 (Cyclooxygenase 1)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180223
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180223
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180105
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190826


  7 / 10472 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29324822
[Au] Autor:Ledogar JA; Luk THY; Perry JMG; Neaux D; Wroe S
[Ad] Endereço:Zoology Division, School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia.
[Ti] Título:Biting mechanics and niche separation in a specialized clade of primate seed predators.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190689, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We analyzed feeding biomechanics in pitheciine monkeys (Pithecia, Chiropotes, Cacajao), a clade that specializes on hard-husked unripe fruit (sclerocarpy) and resistant seeds (seed predation). We tested the hypothesis that pitheciine crania are well-suited to generate and withstand forceful canine and molar biting, with the prediction that they generate bite forces more efficiently and better resist masticatory strains than the closely-related Callicebus, which does not specialize on unripe fruits and/or seeds. We also tested the hypothesis that Callicebus-Pithecia-Chiropotes-Cacajao represent a morphocline of increasing sclerocarpic specialization with respect to biting leverage and craniofacial strength, consistent with anterior dental morphology. We found that pitheciines have higher biting leverage than Callicebus and are generally more resistant to masticatory strain. However, Cacajao was found to experience high strain magnitudes in some facial regions. We therefore found limited support for the morphocline hypothesis, at least with respect to the mechanical performance metrics examined here. Biting leverage in Cacajao was nearly identical (or slightly less than) in Chiropotes and strain magnitudes during canine biting were more likely to follow a Cacajao-Chiropotes-Pithecia trend of increasing strength, in contrast to the proposed morphocline. These results could indicate that bite force efficiency and derived anterior teeth were selected for in pitheciines at the expense of increased strain magnitudes. However, our results for Cacajao potentially reflect reduced feeding competition offered by allopatry with other pitheciines, which allows Cacajao species to choose from a wider variety of fruits at various stages of ripeness, leading to reduction in the selection for robust facial features. We also found that feeding biomechanics in sympatric Pithecia and Chiropotes are consistent with data on food structural properties and observations of dietary niche separation, with the former being well-suited for the regular molar crushing of hard seeds and the latter better adapted for breaching hard fruits.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dieta
Ecossistema
Comportamento Alimentar
Mastigação
Primatas/fisiologia
Sementes
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180215
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180215
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190689


  8 / 10472 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
[PMID]:29297217
[Au] Autor:Musajo-Somma L; Musajo-Somma A
[Ti] Título:Medical Rejuvenation in Georgia in the past: the Sukhumi Station.
[So] Source:Vesalius;22(2 Suppl):59-66, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1373-4857
[Cp] País de publicação:Belgium
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:If youth and body appearance enhancement is as old as Homo Sapiens, reliable medical technology for such activities is only about 100 years old. At the dawn of the 20th century, surgical operations performed under the Voronoff's treatment plan (monkey gonads' tissue grafting into humans) or the Steinach's technique (vasoligation) offered a promise of longevity, beauty and therefore youth restoration. The many links with a newly recognized discipline, endocrinology, offer a critical insight on the strong interactions between medicine and surgery in the promise of successful antiaging. On the front-line of scientific research, the Institute of Experimental Endocrinology's primate station in Sukhumi (West Georgia, now Abkhazia, on the Black Sea coast) developed a leadership role in the medical research, including rejuvenation with testis' tissues. Authors focus their attention to the everlasting commitment to experimental and clinical research as developed by Sukhumi scholars and the related moral, practical and ideological implications.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fisiologia/história
Rejuvenescimento
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Endocrinologia/história
República da Geórgia
Gônadas/cirurgia
Gônadas/transplante
Haplorrinos/cirurgia
História do Século XX
História do Século XXI
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Primatas/fisiologia
Primatas/cirurgia
Testículo/fisiologia
Testículo/cirurgia
U.R.S.S.
Vasectomia/história
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:BIOGRAPHY; HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE; PORTRAITS
[Ps] Nome de pessoa como assunto:Ivanov I; Koltsov NK
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180212
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180212
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:QIS
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180104
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 10472 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29223358
[Au] Autor:Xu Y; Li W; Hu Z; Zeng T; Shen Y; Liu S; Zhang X; Li J; Yue B
[Ad] Endereço:Key Laboratory of Bio-resources and Eco-environment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, PR China.
[Ti] Título:Genome-wide mining of perfect microsatellites and tetranucleotide orthologous microsatellites estimates in six primate species.
[So] Source:Gene;643:124-132, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0038
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Advancement in genome sequencing and in silico mining tools have provided new opportunities for comparative primate genomics of microsatellites. The SSRs (simple sequence repeats) numbers were not correlated with the genome size (Pearson, r=0.310, p=0.550), and were positively correlated with the total length of SSRs (Pearson, r=0.992, p=0.00). A total of 224,289 tetranucleotide orthologous microsatellites families and 367 single-copy orthologous SSRs loci were found in six primate species by homologous alignment. The inner mutation types of single-copy orthologous SSRs loci included the copy number variance, point mutation, and chromosomal translocation. The accumulated repeat times and average length of tetranucleotide orthologous microsatellites in Rhinopithecus roxellana, Papio anubis and Macaca mulatta were longer than Homo sapiens and Pan troglodytes, which showed the tetranucleotide orthologous SSRs loci had more repeat times and longer average length on the branches with earlier divergence time, one exception may be Microcebus murinus as a primitive monkey with a smallest morphology in Malagasy. Our conclusion indicated that single-copy tetranucleotide orthologous SSRs sequences accumulated individual mutation more slowly through time in H. sapiens and P. troglodytes than in R. roxellanae, P. anubis and M. mulatta. However, such divergence wouldn't arise uniformly in all branches of the primate tree. A comparison of genomic sequence assemblages would offer remarkable insights about comparisons and contrasts, and the evolutionary processes of the microsatellites involved in human and nonhuman primate species.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Repetições de Microssatélites/genética
Primatas/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Alelos
Animais
Sequência de Bases/genética
Mapeamento Cromossômico
Genoma
Seres Humanos
Filogenia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180123
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180123
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171211
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  10 / 10472 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29236732
[Au] Autor:Embers ME; Hasenkampf NR; Jacobs MB; Tardo AC; Doyle-Meyers LA; Philipp MT; Hodzic E
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Bacteriology and Parasitology, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, Covington, LA, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Variable manifestations, diverse seroreactivity and post-treatment persistence in non-human primates exposed to Borrelia burgdorferi by tick feeding.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189071, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The efficacy and accepted regimen of antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease has been a point of significant contention among physicians and patients. While experimental studies in animals have offered evidence of post-treatment persistence of Borrelia burgdorferi, variations in methodology, detection methods and limitations of the models have led to some uncertainty with respect to translation of these results to human infection. With all stages of clinical Lyme disease having previously been described in nonhuman primates, this animal model was selected in order to most closely mimic human infection and response to treatment. Rhesus macaques were inoculated with B. burgdorferi by tick bite and a portion were treated with recommended doses of doxycycline for 28 days at four months post-inoculation. Signs of infection, clinical pathology, and antibody responses to a set of five antigens were monitored throughout the ~1.2 year study. Persistence of B. burgdorferi was evaluated using xenodiagnosis, bioassays in mice, multiple methods of molecular detection, immunostaining with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies and an in vivo culture system. Our results demonstrate host-dependent signs of infection and variation in antibody responses. In addition, we observed evidence of persistent, intact, metabolically-active B. burgdorferi after antibiotic treatment of disseminated infection and showed that persistence may not be reflected by maintenance of specific antibody production by the host.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Borrelia burgdorferi/fisiologia
Ixodes/microbiologia
Primatas/parasitologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ixodes/fisiologia
Camundongos
Picadas de Carrapatos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189071



página 1 de 1048 ir para página                         
   


Refinar a pesquisa
  Base de dados : MEDLINE Formulário avançado   

    Pesquisar no campo  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/OPAS/OMS - Centro Latino-Americano e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde