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  1 / 16156 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27778378
[Au] Autor:Bragg EM; Fairless EA; Liu S; Briggs F
[Ad] Endereço:Physiology & Neurobiology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire.
[Ti] Título:Morphology of visual sector thalamic reticular neurons in the macaque monkey suggests retinotopically specialized, parallel stream-mixed input to the lateral geniculate nucleus.
[So] Source:J Comp Neurol;525(5):1273-1290, 2017 Apr 01.
[Is] ISSN:1096-9861
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) is a unique brain structure at the interface between the thalamus and the cortex. Because the TRN receives bottom-up sensory input and top-down cortical input, it could serve as an integration hub for sensory and cognitive signals. Functional evidence supports broad roles for the TRN in arousal, attention, and sensory selection. How specific circuits connecting the TRN with sensory thalamic structures implement these functions is not known. The structural organization and function of the TRN is particularly interesting in the context of highly organized sensory systems, such as the primate visual system, where neurons in the retina and dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus (dLGN) are morphologically and physiologically distinct and also specialized for processing particular features of the visual environment. To gain insight into the functional relationship between the visual sector of the TRN and the dLGN, we reconstructed a large number of TRN neurons that were retrogradely labeled following injections of rabies virus expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into the dLGN. An independent cluster analysis, based on 10 morphological metrics measured for each reconstructed neuron, revealed three clusters of TRN neurons that differed in cell body shape and size, dendritic arborization patterns, and medial-lateral position within the TRN. TRN dendritic and axonal morphologies are inconsistent with visual stream-specific projections to the dLGN. Instead, TRN neuronal organization could facilitate transmission of global arousal and/or cognitive signals to the dLGN with retinotopic precision that preserves specialized processing of foveal versus peripheral visual information. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1273-1290, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Corpos Geniculados/citologia
Neurônios/citologia
Núcleos Talâmicos/citologia
Vias Visuais/citologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Imagem Tridimensional
Macaca
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/cne.24134


  2 / 16156 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28467303
[Au] Autor:Khanna P; Carmena JM
[Ad] Endereço:UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Graduate Program in Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States.
[Ti] Título:Beta band oscillations in motor cortex reflect neural population signals that delay movement onset.
[So] Source:Elife;6, 2017 05 03.
[Is] ISSN:2050-084X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Motor cortical beta oscillations have been reported for decades, yet their behavioral correlates remain unresolved. Some studies link beta oscillations to changes in underlying neural activity, but the specific behavioral manifestations of these reported changes remain elusive. To investigate how changes in population neural activity, beta oscillations, and behavior are linked, we recorded multi-scale neural activity from motor cortex while three macaques performed a novel neurofeedback task. Subjects volitionally brought their beta oscillatory power to an instructed state and subsequently executed an arm reach. Reaches preceded by a reduction in beta power exhibited significantly faster movement onset times than reaches preceded by an increase in beta power. Further, population neural activity was found to shift farther from a movement onset state during beta oscillations that were neurofeedback-induced or naturally occurring during reaching tasks. This finding establishes a population neural basis for slowed movement onset following periods of beta oscillatory activity.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ritmo beta
Córtex Motor/fisiologia
Movimento
Neurônios/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Animal
Macaca
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  3 / 16156 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27775722
[Au] Autor:Laurens J; Kim B; Dickman JD; Angelaki DE
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.
[Ti] Título:Gravity orientation tuning in macaque anterior thalamus.
[So] Source:Nat Neurosci;19(12):1566-1568, 2016 12.
[Is] ISSN:1546-1726
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Gravity may provide a ubiquitous allocentric reference to the brain's spatial orientation circuits. Here we describe neurons in the macaque anterior thalamus tuned to pitch and roll orientation relative to gravity, independently of visual landmarks. We show that individual cells exhibit two-dimensional tuning curves, with peak firing rates at a preferred vertical orientation. These results identify a thalamic pathway for gravity cues to influence perception, action and spatial cognition.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Potenciais de Ação/fisiologia
Núcleos Anteriores do Tálamo/fisiologia
Cognição/fisiologia
Gravitação
Neurônios/fisiologia
Orientação/fisiologia
Percepção Espacial/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Macaca
Estimulação Luminosa/métodos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180223
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180223
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161108
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/nn.4423


  4 / 16156 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29293657
[Au] Autor:Hanya G; Otani Y; Hongo S; Honda T; Okamura H; Higo Y
[Ad] Endereço:Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Inuyama, Japan.
[Ti] Título:Activity of wild Japanese macaques in Yakushima revealed by camera trapping: Patterns with respect to season, daily period and rainfall.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190631, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Animals are subject to various scales of temporal environmental fluctuations, among which daily and seasonal variations are two of the most widespread and significant ones. Many biotic and abiotic factors change temporally, and climatic factors are particularly important because they directly affect the cost of thermoregulation. The purpose of the present study was to determine the activity patterns of wild Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) with a special emphasis on the effect of thermal conditions. We set 30 camera traps in the coniferous forest of Yakushima and monitored them for a total of 8658 camera-days between July 2014 and July 2015. Over the one-year period, temperature had a positive effect, and rainfall had a negative effect on the activity of macaques during the day. Capture rate was significantly higher during the time period of one hour after sunrise and during midday. During winter days, macaques concentrated their activity around noon, and activity shifted from the morning toward the afternoon. This could be interpreted as macaques shifting their activity to warmer time periods within a single day. Japanese macaques decreased their activity during the time before sunrise in seasons with lower temperatures. It was beneficial for macaques to be less active during cooler time periods in a cold season. Even small amounts of rainfall negatively affected the activity of Japanese macaques, with capture rates decreasing significantly even when rainfall was only 0.5-1 mm/min. In conclusion, thermal conditions significantly affected the activity of wild Japanese macaques at various time scales.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal
Macaca/fisiologia
Fotografia
Chuvas
Estações do Ano
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Clima
Japão
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180221
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180221
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180103
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190631


  5 / 16156 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29261734
[Au] Autor:Fan H; Pan X; Wang R; Sakagami M
[Ad] Endereço:Brain Science Institute, Tamagawa University, Machida, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Título:Differences in reward processing between putative cell types in primate prefrontal cortex.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189771, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Single-unit studies in monkeys have demonstrated that neurons in the prefrontal cortex predict the reward type, reward amount or reward availability associated with a stimulus. To examine contributions of pyramidal cells and interneurons in reward processing, single-unit activity was extracellularly recorded in prefrontal cortices of four monkeys performing a reward prediction task. Based on their shapes of spike waveforms, prefrontal neurons were classified into broad-spike and narrow-spike units that represented putative pyramidal cells and interneurons, respectively. We mainly observed that narrow-spike neurons showed higher firing rates but less bursty discharges than did broad-spike neurons. Both narrow-spike and broad-spike cells selectively responded to the stimulus, reward and their interaction, and the proportions of each type of selective neurons were similar between the two cell classes. Moreover, the two types of cells displayed equal reliability of reward or stimulus discrimination. Furthermore, we found that broad-spike and narrow-spike cells showed distinct mechanisms for encoding reward or stimulus information. Broad-spike neurons raised their firing rate relative to the baseline rate to represent the preferred reward or stimulus information, whereas narrow-spike neurons inhibited their firing rate lower than the baseline rate to encode the non-preferred reward or stimulus information. Our results suggest that narrow-spike and broad-spike cells were equally involved in reward and stimulus processing in the prefrontal cortex. They utilized a binary strategy to complementarily represent reward or stimulus information, which was consistent with the task structure in which the monkeys were required to remember two reward conditions and two visual stimuli.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Córtex Pré-Frontal/citologia
Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia
Recompensa
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Potenciais de Ação/fisiologia
Animais
Comportamento Animal
Discriminação (Psicologia)
Macaca
Neurônios/fisiologia
Curva ROC
Análise e Desempenho de Tarefas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180108
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180108
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189771


  6 / 16156 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28464245
[Au] Autor:Sosa S; Zhang P; Cabanes G
[Ad] Endereço:School of Sociology and Anthropology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
[Ti] Título:Social networks dynamics revealed by temporal analysis: An example in a non-human primate (Macaca sylvanus) in "La Forêt des Singes".
[So] Source:Am J Primatol;79(6), 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2345
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This study applied a temporal social network analysis model to describe three affiliative social networks (allogrooming, sleep in contact, and triadic interaction) in a non-human primate species, Macaca sylvanus. Three main social mechanisms were examined to determine interactional patterns among group members, namely preferential attachment (i.e., highly connected individuals are more likely to form new connections), triadic closure (new connections occur via previous close connections), and homophily (individuals interact preferably with others with similar attributes). Preferential attachment was only observed for triadic interaction network. Triadic closure was significant in allogrooming and triadic interaction networks. Finally, gender homophily was seasonal for allogrooming and sleep in contact networks, and observed in each period for triadic interaction network. These individual-based behaviors are based on individual reactions, and their analysis can shed light on the formation of the affiliative networks determining ultimate coalition networks, and how these networks may evolve over time. A focus on individual behaviors is necessary for a global interactional approach to understanding social behavior rules and strategies. When combined, these social processes could make animal social networks more resilient, thus enabling them to face drastic environmental changes. This is the first study to pinpoint some of the processes underlying the formation of a social structure in a non-human primate species, and identify common mechanisms with humans. The approach used in this study provides an ideal tool for further research seeking to answer long-standing questions about social network dynamics.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Macaca
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Meio Ambiente
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171222
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171222
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajp.22662


  7 / 16156 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29045402
[Au] Autor:Kalbitz J; Schülke O; Ostner J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Behavioral Ecology, Johann-Friedrich-Blumenbach Institute for Zoology and Anthropology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Triadic male-infant-male interaction serves in bond maintenance in male Assamese macaques.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0183981, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:While the ultimate consequences of social bonds start to be better understood, the proximate behavioural mechanisms underlying the formation and maintenance of these close affiliative relationships have received less attention. We investigated the possible function of male-infant-male interactions (MIMIs) in male-male social bonding processes by analysing about 9000h of focal animal observations collected on two groups of wild Assamese macaques. In support of an agonistic buffering function of MIMIs, after engaging in a MIMI upon approach, subordinates stayed longer in close proximity of a dominant male. Overall, the frequency of MIMIs increased the stronger the affiliative relationship between two males, suggesting that MIMIs like grooming function in relationship maintenance. We did not find support for a role of MIMIs in bond formation as the frequency of MIMIs did not affect the time a male dyad spent in proximity in the consecutive year. Our results contribute to the general debate on behaviours influencing social dynamics in group living mammals.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Modelos Lineares
Macaca
Masculino
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171031
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171031
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171019
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0183981


  8 / 16156 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28968396
[Au] Autor:Rostami V; Porta Mana P; Grün S; Helias M
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-6) and Institute for Advanced Simulation (IAS-6) and JARA BRAIN Institute I, Jülich Research Centre, Jülich, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Bistability, non-ergodicity, and inhibition in pairwise maximum-entropy models.
[So] Source:PLoS Comput Biol;13(10):e1005762, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7358
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Pairwise maximum-entropy models have been used in neuroscience to predict the activity of neuronal populations, given only the time-averaged correlations of the neuron activities. This paper provides evidence that the pairwise model, applied to experimental recordings, would produce a bimodal distribution for the population-averaged activity, and for some population sizes the second mode would peak at high activities, that experimentally would be equivalent to 90% of the neuron population active within time-windows of few milliseconds. Several problems are connected with this bimodality: 1. The presence of the high-activity mode is unrealistic in view of observed neuronal activity and on neurobiological grounds. 2. Boltzmann learning becomes non-ergodic, hence the pairwise maximum-entropy distribution cannot be found: in fact, Boltzmann learning would produce an incorrect distribution; similarly, common variants of mean-field approximations also produce an incorrect distribution. 3. The Glauber dynamics associated with the model is unrealistically bistable and cannot be used to generate realistic surrogate data. This bimodality problem is first demonstrated for an experimental dataset from 159 neurons in the motor cortex of macaque monkey. Evidence is then provided that this problem affects typical neural recordings of population sizes of a couple of hundreds or more neurons. The cause of the bimodality problem is identified as the inability of standard maximum-entropy distributions with a uniform reference measure to model neuronal inhibition. To eliminate this problem a modified maximum-entropy model is presented, which reflects a basic effect of inhibition in the form of a simple but non-uniform reference measure. This model does not lead to unrealistic bimodalities, can be found with Boltzmann learning, and has an associated Glauber dynamics which incorporates a minimal asymmetric inhibition.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Biologia Computacional/métodos
Entropia
Modelos Neurológicos
Córtex Motor/fisiologia
Rede Nervosa/fisiologia
Neurônios/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Macaca
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171031
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171031
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171003
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005762


  9 / 16156 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28961235
[Au] Autor:Chen Y; Wang S; Hilgetag CC; Zhou C
[Ad] Endereço:National Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Título:Features of spatial and functional segregation and integration of the primate connectome revealed by trade-off between wiring cost and efficiency.
[So] Source:PLoS Comput Biol;13(9):e1005776, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7358
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The primate connectome, possessing a characteristic global topology and specific regional connectivity profiles, is well organized to support both segregated and integrated brain function. However, the organization mechanisms shaping the characteristic connectivity and its relationship to functional requirements remain unclear. The primate brain connectome is shaped by metabolic economy as well as functional values. Here, we explored the influence of two competing factors and additional advanced functional requirements on the primate connectome employing an optimal trade-off model between neural wiring cost and the representative functional requirement of processing efficiency. Moreover, we compared this model with a generative model combining spatial distance and topological similarity, with the objective of statistically reproducing multiple topological features of the network. The primate connectome indeed displays a cost-efficiency trade-off and that up to 67% of the connections were recovered by optimal combination of the two basic factors of wiring economy and processing efficiency, clearly higher than the proportion of connections (56%) explained by the generative model. While not explicitly aimed for, the trade-off model captured several key topological features of the real connectome as the generative model, yet better explained the connectivity of most regions. The majority of the remaining 33% of connections unexplained by the best trade-off model were long-distance links, which are concentrated on few cortical areas, termed long-distance connectors (LDCs). The LDCs are mainly non-hubs, but form a densely connected group overlapping on spatially segregated functional modalities. LDCs are crucial for both functional segregation and integration across different scales. These organization features revealed by the optimization analysis provide evidence that the demands of advanced functional segregation and integration among spatially distributed regions may play a significant role in shaping the cortical connectome, in addition to the basic cost-efficiency trade-off. These findings also shed light on inherent vulnerabilities of brain networks in diseases.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Encéfalo/fisiologia
Biologia Computacional
Conectoma
Rede Nervosa/fisiologia
Vias Neurais/fisiologia
Primatas/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Algoritmos
Animais
Mapeamento Encefálico
Bases de Dados Factuais
Seres Humanos
Macaca
Modelos Neurológicos
Modelos Estatísticos
Software
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171103
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171103
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170930
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005776


  10 / 16156 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28957679
[Au] Autor:Schwiedrzik CM; Freiwald WA
[Ad] Endereço:Laboratory of Neural Systems, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA; Neural Circuits and Cognition Lab, European Neuroscience Institute, 37077 Göttingen, Germany; University Medical Center Goettingen, 37075 Göttingen, Germany; Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, German Primate Center, 37077 Göttingen, Germany. Electronic address: c.schwiedrzik@eni-g.de.
[Ti] Título:High-Level Prediction Signals in a Low-Level Area of the Macaque Face-Processing Hierarchy.
[So] Source:Neuron;96(1):89-97.e4, 2017 Sep 27.
[Is] ISSN:1097-4199
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Theories like predictive coding propose that lower-order brain areas compare their inputs to predictions derived from higher-order representations and signal their deviation as a prediction error. Here, we investigate whether the macaque face-processing system, a three-level hierarchy in the ventral stream, employs such a coding strategy. We show that after statistical learning of specific face sequences, the lower-level face area ML computes the deviation of actual from predicted stimuli. But these signals do not reflect the tuning characteristic of ML. Rather, they exhibit identity specificity and view invariance, the tuning properties of higher-level face areas AL and AM. Thus, learning appears to endow lower-level areas with the capability to test predictions at a higher level of abstraction than what is afforded by the feedforward sweep. These results provide evidence for computational architectures like predictive coding and suggest a new quality of functional organization of information-processing hierarchies beyond pure feedforward schemes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Mapeamento Encefálico
Reconhecimento Facial/fisiologia
Aprendizagem/fisiologia
Lobo Temporal/fisiologia
Vias Visuais/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Animais
Face
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Macaca
Imagem por Ressonância Magnética
Masculino
Vias Neurais/fisiologia
Estimulação Luminosa
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171010
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171010
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170929
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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