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[PMID]:28081564
[Au] Autor:Mombo IM; Lukashev AN; Bleicker T; Brünink S; Berthet N; Maganga GD; Durand P; Arnathau C; Boundenga L; Ngoubangoye B; Boué V; Liégeois F; Ollomo B; Prugnolle F; Drexler JF; Drosten C; Renaud F; Rougeron V; Leroy E
[Ad] Endereço:International Center for Medical Research of Franceville, BP769, Franceville, Gabon.
[Ti] Título:African Non-Human Primates Host Diverse Enteroviruses.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(1):e0169067, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Enteroviruses (EVs) belong to the family Picornaviridae and are responsible for mild to severe diseases in mammals including humans and non-human primates (NHP). Simian EVs were first discovered in the 1950s in the Old World Monkeys and recently in wild chimpanzee, gorilla and mandrill in Cameroon. In the present study, we screened by PCR EVs in 600 fecal samples of wild apes and monkeys that were collected at four sites in Gabon. A total of 32 samples were positive for EVs (25 from mandrills, 7 from chimpanzees, none from gorillas). The phylogenetic analysis of VP1 and VP2 genes showed that EVs identified in chimpanzees were members of two human EV species, EV-A and EV-B, and those identified in mandrills were members of the human species EV-B and the simian species EV-J. The identification of two novel enterovirus types, EV-B112 in a chimpanzee and EV-B113 in a mandrill, suggests these NHPs could be potential sources of new EV types. The identification of EV-B107 and EV90 that were previously found in humans indicates cross-species transfers. Also the identification of chimpanzee-derived EV110 in a mandrill demonstrated a wide host range of this EV. Further research of EVs in NHPs would help understanding emergence of new types or variants, and evaluating the real risk of cross-species transmission for humans as well for NHPs populations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doenças dos Símios Antropoides
Infecções por Enterovirus
Enterovirus
Gorilla gorilla/virologia
Mandrillus/virologia
Pan troglodytes/virologia
Filogenia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Doenças dos Símios Antropoides/genética
Doenças dos Símios Antropoides/virologia
Enterovirus/genética
Enterovirus/isolamento & purificação
Infecções por Enterovirus/genética
Infecções por Enterovirus/veterinária
Infecções por Enterovirus/virologia
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170802
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170802
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170113
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0169067


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[PMID]:27486075
[Au] Autor:Ngoubangoye B; Boundenga L; Arnathau C; Mombo IM; Durand P; Tsoumbou TA; Otoro BV; Sana R; Okouga AP; Moukodoum N; Willaume E; Herbert A; Fouchet D; Rougeron V; Bâ CT; Ollomo B; Paupy C; Leroy EM; Renaud F; Pontier D; Prugnolle F
[Ad] Endereço:Centre de Primatologie, CIRMF, B.P. 769, Franceville, Gabon; Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, UMR5558, Université Lyon 1, France; LabEx ECOFECT, Eco-evolutionary Dynamics of Infectious Diseases, University of Lyon, France. Electronic address: genistha@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Título:The host specificity of ape malaria parasites can be broken in confined environments.
[So] Source:Int J Parasitol;46(11):737-44, 2016 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0135
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Recent studies have revealed a large diversity of Plasmodium spp. among African great apes. Some of these species are related to Plasmodium falciparum, the most virulent agent of human malaria (subgenus Laverania), and others to Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax (subgenus Plasmodium), three other human malaria agents. Laverania parasites exhibit strict host specificity in their natural environment. Plasmodium reichenowi, Plasmodium billcollinsi, Plasmodium billbrayi and Plasmodium gaboni infect only chimpanzees, while Plasmodium praefalciparum, Plasmodium blacklocki and Plasmodium adleri are restricted to gorillas and Plasmodium falciparum is pandemic in humans. This host specificity may be due to genetic and/or environmental factors. Infrastructures hosting captive primates, such as sanctuaries and health centres, usually concentrate different primate species, thus favouring pathogen exchanges. Using molecular tools, we analysed blood samples from captive non-human primates living in Gabon to evaluate the risk of Plasmodium spp. transfers between host species. We also included blood samples from workers taking care of primates to assess whether primate-human parasite transfers occurred. We detected four transfers of Plasmodium from gorillas towards chimpanzees, one from chimpanzees to gorillas, three from humans towards chimpanzees and one from humans to mandrills. No simian Plasmodium was found in the blood samples from humans working with primates. These findings demonstrate that the genetic barrier that determines the apparent host specificity of Laverania is not completely impermeable and that parasite exchanges between gorillas and chimpanzees are possible in confined environments.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Especificidade de Hospedeiro
Malária/parasitologia
Plasmodium/fisiologia
Doenças dos Primatas/parasitologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Anopheles/parasitologia
Citocromos b/genética
DNA Mitocondrial/sangue
DNA Mitocondrial/química
DNA Mitocondrial/isolamento & purificação
DNA de Protozoário/sangue
DNA de Protozoário/química
DNA de Protozoário/isolamento & purificação
Ecossistema
Gabão
Genoma Mitocondrial/genética
Gorilla gorilla/parasitologia
Haplorrinos/parasitologia
Especificidade de Hospedeiro/genética
Seres Humanos
Funções Verossimilhança
Malária/fisiopatologia
Malária/transmissão
Mandrillus/parasitologia
Mosquitos Vetores/parasitologia
Pan troglodytes/parasitologia
Filogenia
Plasmodium/classificação
Plasmodium/genética
Doenças dos Primatas/transmissão
Primatas
Fatores de Risco
Análise de Sequência de DNA
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Mitochondrial); 0 (DNA, Protozoan); 9035-37-4 (Cytochromes b)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170713
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170713
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160804
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:27468036
[Au] Autor:Okeson DM; Higbie CT; Mylniczenko ND; Haynes A; Bennett S; Klocke E; Carpenter JW
[Ti] Título:MANAGEMENT OF ENDOMETRIOSIS IN TWO CAPTIVE MANDRILLS (MANDRILLUS SPHINX).
[So] Source:J Zoo Wildl Med;47(2):614-7, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1042-7260
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Endometriosis has been reported in humans, great apes, and Old World monkeys. Although cases are noted anecdotally in Mandrillus spp., and a previously reported case was noted on postmortem examination, to the authors' knowledge, no previous reports of case management have been published in the peer-reviewed literature. This paper describes the medical and surgical management of endometriosis in two mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Endometriose/diagnóstico
Mandrillus
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Endometriose/cirurgia
Feminino
Histerectomia/veterinária
Ovariectomia/veterinária
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1609
[Cu] Atualização por classe:160729
[Lr] Data última revisão:
160729
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160729
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1638/2015-0067.1


  4 / 89 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26925773
[Au] Autor:Ghenu AH; Bolker BM; Melnick DJ; Evans BJ
[Ad] Endereço:Biology Department, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, L8S 4K1, Canada. ghenua@mcmaster.ca.
[Ti] Título:Multicopy gene family evolution on primate Y chromosomes.
[So] Source:BMC Genomics;17:157, 2016 Feb 29.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2164
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The primate Y chromosome is distinguished by a lack of inter-chromosomal recombination along most of its length, extensive gene loss, and a prevalence of repetitive elements. A group of genes on the male-specific portion of the Y chromosome known as the "ampliconic genes" are present in multiple copies that are sometimes part of palindromes, and that undergo a form of intra-chromosomal recombination called gene conversion, wherein the nucleotides of one copy are homogenized by those of another. With the aim of further understanding gene family evolution of these genes, we collected nucleotide sequence and gene copy number information for several species of papionin monkey. We then tested for evidence of gene conversion, and developed a novel statistical framework to evaluate alternative models of gene family evolution using our data combined with other information from a human, a chimpanzee, and a rhesus macaque. RESULTS: Our results (i) recovered evidence for several novel examples of gene conversion in papionin monkeys and indicate that (ii) ampliconic gene families evolve faster than autosomal gene families and than single-copy genes on the Y chromosome and that (iii) Y-linked singleton and autosomal gene families evolved faster in humans and chimps than they do in the other Old World Monkey lineages we studied. CONCLUSIONS: Rapid evolution of ampliconic genes cannot be attributed solely to residence on the Y chromosome, nor to variation between primate lineages in the rate of gene family evolution. Instead other factors, such as natural selection and gene conversion, appear to play a role in driving temporal and genomic evolutionary heterogeneity in primate gene families.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cromossomos Humanos Y/genética
Evolução Molecular
Conversão Gênica
Dosagem de Genes
Família Multigênica
Cromossomo Y/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Sequência de Bases
Seres Humanos
Macaca mulatta/genética
Masculino
Mandrillus/genética
Modelos Genéticos
Pan troglodytes/genética
Papio anubis/genética
Filogenia
Análise de Sequência de DNA
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1609
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160302
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12864-015-2187-8


  5 / 89 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26808101
[Au] Autor:Setchell JM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology, Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Behaviour Ecology and Evolution Research (BEER) Centre, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK.
[Ti] Título:Sexual Selection and the differences between the sexes in Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx).
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;159(Suppl 61):S105-29, 2016 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Sexual selection has become a major focus in evolutionary and behavioral ecology. It is also a popular research topic in primatology. I use studies of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx), a classic example of extravagant armaments and ornaments in animals, to exemplify how a long-term, multidisciplinary approach that integrates field observations with laboratory methods can contribute to on-going theoretical debates in the field of sexual selection. I begin with a brief summary of the main concepts of sexual selection theory and the differences between the sexes. I then introduce mandrills and the study population and review mandrill life history, the ontogeny of sex differences, and maternal effects. Next, I focus on male-male competition and female choice, followed by the less well-studied questions of female-female competition and male choice. This review shows how different reproductive priorities lead to very different life histories and divergent adaptations in males and females. It demonstrates how broadening traditional perspectives on sexual selection beyond the ostentatious results of intense sexual selection on males leads to an understanding of more subtle and cryptic forms of competition and choice in both sexes and opens many productive avenues in the study of primate reproductive strategies. These include the potential for studies of postcopulatory selection, female intrasexual competition, and male choice. These studies of mandrills provide comparison and, I hope, inspiration for studies of both other polygynandrous species and species with mating systems less traditionally associated with sexual selection.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Mandrillus/fisiologia
Comportamento Sexual/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antropologia Física
Comportamento Competitivo
Feminino
Masculino
Caracteres Sexuais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1610
[Cu] Atualização por classe:161230
[Lr] Data última revisão:
161230
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160126
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.22904


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[PMID]:26708734
[Au] Autor:Vaglio S; Minicozzi P; Romoli R; Boscaro F; Pieraccini G; Moneti G; Moggi-Cecchi J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology & Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution Research Centre, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, UK, School of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1LY, UK, Laboratory of Anthropology, Department of Biology, Florence University,
[Ti] Título:Sternal Gland Scent-Marking Signals Sex, Age, Rank, and Group Identity in Captive Mandrills.
[So] Source:Chem Senses;41(2):177-86, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1464-3553
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Mandrills are one of the few Old World primates to show scent-marking. We combined ethological and chemical approaches to improve our understanding of this behavior in 3 zoo-managed groups. We observed the olfactory behavior performed by adults and adolescents (N = 39) for 775h. We investigated the volatile components of sternal scent-marks using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared volatile profiles with traits of the signaler. Males marked more than females and within each sex the frequency of scent-marking was related to age and dominance status, but alpha males scent-marked most frequently and particularly in specific areas at the enclosure boundaries. We identified a total of 77 volatile components of sternal gland secretion, including compounds functioning as male sex pheromones in other mammals, in scent-marks spontaneously released on filter paper by 27 male and 18 female mandrills. We confirmed our previous findings that chemical profiles contain information including sex, male age and rank, and we also found that odor may encode information about group membership in mandrills. Our results support the hypotheses that scent-marking signals the status of the dominant male as well as playing territorial functions but also suggest that it is part of sociosexual communication.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Envelhecimento
Comunicação Animal
Animais de Zoológico/fisiologia
Hierarquia Social
Mandrillus/fisiologia
Odorantes
Glândulas Odoríferas/secreção
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Fatores Etários
Animais
Feminino
Cromatografia Gasosa-Espectrometria de Massas
Processos Grupais
Masculino
Fatores Sexuais
Territorialidade
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1610
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170103
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170103
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:151229
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/chemse/bjv077


  7 / 89 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26515669
[Au] Autor:Poirotte C; Basset D; Willaume E; Makaba F; Kappeler PM; Charpentier MJ
[Ad] Endereço:CEFE-CNRS UMR 5175, 34293 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
[Ti] Título:Environmental and individual determinants of parasite richness across seasons in a free-ranging population of Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx).
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;159(3):442-56, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: Parasites are ubiquitous and evolve fast. Therefore, they represent major selective forces acting on their hosts by influencing many aspects of their biology. Humans are no exception, as they share many parasites with animals and some of the most important outbreaks come from primates. While it appears important to understand the factors involved in parasite dynamics, we still lack a clear understanding of the determinants underlying parasitism. In this 2-year study, we identified several factors that influence parasite patterns in a wild population of free-ranging mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx). METHODS: We explored the potential impact of seasonal factors-rainfall and temperature-and host characteristics, including sex, age, rank, and reproductive status, on parasite richness. We analyzed 12 parasite taxa found in 870 fecal samples collected from 63 individuals. Because nematodes and protozoa have different life-cycles, we analyzed these two types of parasites separately. RESULTS: Contrary to other studies where humid conditions seem favorable to parasite development, we report here that rainfall and high temperatures were associated with lower nematode richness and were not associated with lower protozoa richness. In contrast, female reproductive status seemed to reflect the seasonal patterns found for protozoa richness, as early gestating females harbored more protozoa than other females. Sex and dominance rank had no impact on overall parasite richness. However, age was associated with a specific decrease in nematode richness. CONCLUSION: Our study emphasizes the need to consider the ecological context, such as climatic conditions and habitat type, as well as the biology of both parasite and host when analyzing determinants of parasite richness.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Mandrillus/parasitologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antropologia Física
Clima
Entamoeba
Fezes/parasitologia
Feminino
Gabão
Masculino
Nematoides
Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/parasitologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1609
[Cu] Atualização por classe:160219
[Lr] Data última revisão:
160219
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:151031
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.22888


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[PMID]:26375479
[Au] Autor:Owens JR; Honarvar S; Nessel M; Hearn GW
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
[Ti] Título:From frugivore to folivore: Altitudinal variations in the diet and feeding ecology of the Bioko Island drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus poensis).
[So] Source:Am J Primatol;77(12):1263-75, 2015 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2345
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Variation in the quality and availability of food resources can greatly influence the ecology, behavior, and conservation of wild primates. We studied the influence of altitudinal differences in resource availability on diet in wild drill monkeys (Mandrillus leucophaeus poensis) on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea. We compared fecal samples (n = 234) collected across three consecutive dry seasons for drills living in lowland (0-300 m asl) forest with nearby (18 km distance) drills living in montane forest (500-1000 m asl) in the Gran Caldera Southern Highlands Scientific Reserve. Lowland forest drills had a frugivorous diet very similar to that reported from studies on nearby mainland drills (M. l. leucophaeus) and mandrills (M. sphinx), with fruits comprising 90% of their dried fecal samples. However drills living in montane forest had a more folivorous diet, with herbaceous pith, leaves and fungi comprising 74% of their dried fecal samples and fruit becoming a minor component (24%). Furthermore, a dietary preference index indicated that the differences in the proportion of fruit and fibrous vegetation in the diets of lowland compared to montane drills was not simply a result of relative availability. Montane drills were actively consuming a higher mass of the available fruits and fibrous vegetation, a condition reflected in the greater mass of their fresh feces. Our results demonstrate the unexpected flexibility and complexity of dietary choices of this endangered species in two adjacent habitat types, a comparison of considerable importance for many other limited-range species faced with habitat loss and climate change.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dieta
Preferências Alimentares
Mandrillus/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Altitude
Animais
Ecossistema
Espécies em Perigo de Extinção
Guiné Equatorial
Fezes
Florestas
Frutas
Fungos
Herbivoria
Folhas de Planta
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1606
[Cu] Atualização por classe:151030
[Lr] Data última revisão:
151030
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:150917
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajp.22479


  9 / 89 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26235675
[Au] Autor:Brockmeyer T; Kappeler PM; Willaume E; Benoit L; Mboumba S; Charpentier MJ
[Ad] Endereço:CEFE-CNRS UMR 5175, Montpellier, France.
[Ti] Título:Social organization and space use of a wild mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) group.
[So] Source:Am J Primatol;77(10):1036-48, 2015 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2345
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) are enigmatic Old World primates whose social organization and ecology remain poorly known. Previous studies indicated, for example, that groups are composed of only adult females and their young or that several units composed of one adult male and several females make up larger permanent social units. Here, we present the first data on group composition and male ranging patterns from the only habituated wild mandrill group and examine how home range size and daily path length varied with environmental and demographic factors over a 15-month period. Our study site is located in southern Gabon where we followed the group on a daily basis, collecting data on presence, ranging, behavior, and parasite load of its individual members. Throughout the study, the group was made up of about 120 individuals, including several non-natal and natal adult and sub-adult males. One-male units were never observed. The mandrills traveled an estimated 0.44-6.50 km/day in a home range area of 866.7 ha. Exploratory analyses revealed that precipitation, the number of adult males present, and the richness of protozoan parasites were all positively correlated with daily path length. These results clarify the social system of mandrills and provide first insights into the factors that shape their ranging patterns.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Distribuição Animal
Mandrillus/fisiologia
Mandrillus/parasitologia
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Entamoeba
Feminino
Gabão
Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital
Masculino
Mandrillus/genética
Nematoides
Chuvas
Reprodução
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1606
[Cu] Atualização por classe:150922
[Lr] Data última revisão:
150922
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:150804
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajp.22439


  10 / 89 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26143560
[Au] Autor:Roussel M; Pontier D; Ngoubangoye B; Kazanji M; Verrier D; Fouchet D
[Ad] Endereço:Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive UMR5558-CNRS, Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, France; Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, LabEx ECOFECT Ecoevolutionary Dynamics of Infectious Diseases, F-69365 Lyon, France. Electronic address: marion.roussel1@gmail.co
[Ti] Título:Modes of transmission of Simian T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1 in semi-captive mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx).
[So] Source:Vet Microbiol;179(3-4):155-61, 2015 Sep 30.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2542
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Non-human primates (NHPs) often live in inaccessible areas, have cryptic behaviors, and are difficult to follow in the wild. Here, we present a study on the spread of the simian T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (STLV-1), the simian counterpart of the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) in a semi-captive mandrill colony. This study combines 28 years of longitudinal monitoring, including behavioral data, with a dynamic mathematical model and Bayesian inference. Three transmission modes were suspected: aggressive, sexual and familial. Our results show that among males, STLV-1 transmission occurs preferentially via aggression. Because of their impressive aggressive behavior male mandrills can easily transmit the virus during fights. On the contrary, sexual activity seems to have little effect. Thus transmission appears to occur primarily via male-male and female-female contact. In addition, for young mandrills, familial transmission appears to play an important role in virus spread.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infecções por Deltaretrovirus/veterinária
Doenças dos Macacos/transmissão
Vírus 1 Linfotrópico T de Símios/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Agressão
Animais
Teorema de Bayes
Comportamento Animal
Infecções por Deltaretrovirus/transmissão
Infecções por Deltaretrovirus/virologia
Feminino
Interações Hospedeiro-Patógeno
Masculino
Mandrillus
Doenças dos Macacos/virologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1605
[Cu] Atualização por classe:150811
[Lr] Data última revisão:
150811
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:150706
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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