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  1 / 97 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28704366
[Au] Autor:Schneider-Crease I; Griffin RH; Gomery MA; Dorny P; Noh JC; Handali S; Chastain HM; Wilkins PP; Nunn CL; Snyder-Mackler N; Beehner JC; Bergman TJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Identifying wildlife reservoirs of neglected taeniid tapeworms: Non-invasive diagnosis of endemic Taenia serialis infection in a wild primate population.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(7):e0005709, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Despite the global distribution and public health consequences of Taenia tapeworms, the life cycles of taeniids infecting wildlife hosts remain largely undescribed. The larval stage of Taenia serialis commonly parasitizes rodents and lagomorphs, but has been reported in a wide range of hosts that includes geladas (Theropithecus gelada), primates endemic to Ethiopia. Geladas exhibit protuberant larval cysts indicative of advanced T. serialis infection that are associated with high mortality. However, non-protuberant larvae can develop in deep tissue or the abdominal cavity, leading to underestimates of prevalence based solely on observable cysts. We adapted a non-invasive monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect circulating Taenia spp. antigen in dried gelada urine. Analysis revealed that this assay was highly accurate in detecting Taenia antigen, with 98.4% specificity, 98.5% sensitivity, and an area under the curve of 0.99. We used this assay to investigate the prevalence of T. serialis infection in a wild gelada population, finding that infection is substantially more widespread than the occurrence of visible T. serialis cysts (16.4% tested positive at least once, while only 6% of the same population exhibited cysts). We examined whether age or sex predicted T. serialis infection as indicated by external cysts and antigen presence. Contrary to the female-bias observed in many Taenia-host systems, we found no significant sex bias in either cyst presence or antigen presence. Age, on the other hand, predicted cyst presence (older individuals were more likely to show cysts) but not antigen presence. We interpret this finding to indicate that T. serialis may infect individuals early in life but only result in visible disease later in life. This is the first application of an antigen ELISA to the study of larval Taenia infection in wildlife, opening the doors to the identification and description of infection dynamics in reservoir populations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doenças Endêmicas
Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática/métodos
Doenças dos Primatas/diagnóstico
Doenças dos Primatas/epidemiologia
Taenia/isolamento & purificação
Teníase/veterinária
Urina/parasitologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antígenos de Helmintos/urina
Etiópia/epidemiologia
Feminino
Masculino
Prevalência
Curva ROC
Sensibilidade e Especificidade
Teníase/diagnóstico
Teníase/epidemiologia
Theropithecus/parasitologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antigens, Helminth)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171121
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171121
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170714
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005709


  2 / 97 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28144947
[Au] Autor:Nguyen N; Lee LM; Fashing PJ; Nurmi NO; Stewart KM; Turner TJ; Barry TS; Callingham KR; Goodale CB; Kellogg BS; Burke RJ; Bechtold EK; Claase MJ; Eriksen GA; Jones SCZ; Kerby JT; Kraus JB; Miller CM; Trew TH; Zhao Y; Beierschmitt EC; Ramsay MS; Reynolds JD; Venkataraman VV
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology & Environmental Studies Program, California State University, Fullerton, Fullerton, California.
[Ti] Título:Comparative primate obstetrics: Observations of 15 diurnal births in wild gelada monkeys (Theropithecus gelada) and their implications for understanding human and nonhuman primate birth evolution.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;163(1):14-29, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: The birth process has been studied extensively in many human societies, yet little is known about this essential life history event in other primates. Here, we provide the most detailed account of behaviors surrounding birth for any wild nonhuman primate to date. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a recent ∼10-year period, we directly observed 15 diurnal births (13 live births and 2 stillbirths) among geladas (Theropithecus gelada) at Guassa, Ethiopia. During each birth, we recorded the occurrence (or absence) of 16 periparturitional events, chosen for their potential to provide comparative evolutionary insights into the factors that shaped birth behaviors in humans and other primates. RESULTS: We found that several events (e.g., adopting standing crouched positions, delivering infants headfirst) occurred during all births, while other events (e.g., aiding the infant from the birth canal, licking infants following delivery, placentophagy) occurred during, or immediately after, most births. Moreover, multiparas (n = 9) were more likely than primiparas (n = 6) to (a) give birth later in the day, (b) isolate themselves from nearby conspecifics while giving birth, (c) aid the infant from the birth canal, and (d) consume the placenta. DISCUSSION: Our results suggest that prior maternal experience may contribute to greater competence or efficiency during the birth process. Moreover, face presentations (in which infants are born with their neck extended and their face appearing first, facing the mother) appear to be the norm for geladas. Lastly, malpresentations (in which infants are born in the occiput anterior position more typical of human infants) may be associated with increased mortality in this species. We compare the birth process in geladas to those in other primates (including humans) and discuss several key implications of our study for advancing understanding of obstetrics and the mechanism of labor in humans and nonhuman primates.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Trabalho de Parto/fisiologia
Parto/fisiologia
Theropithecus/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antropologia Física
Etiópia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Placenta/fisiologia
Gravidez
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170609
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170609
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23141


  3 / 97 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27886811
[Au] Autor:Beaudet A; Dumoncel J; de Beer F; Duployer B; Durrleman S; Gilissen E; Hoffman J; Tenailleau C; Thackeray JF; Braga J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anatomy, University of Pretoria, PO Box 2034, Pretoria 0001, South Africa; Laboratoire d'Anthropologie Moléculaire et Imagerie de Synthèse, UMR 5288 CNRS-Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), 37 Allées Jules Guesde, 31073 Toulouse Cedex 3, France. Electronic address: beaudet.amelie@g
[Ti] Título:Morphoarchitectural variation in South African fossil cercopithecoid endocasts.
[So] Source:J Hum Evol;101:65-78, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8606
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Despite the abundance of well-preserved crania and natural endocasts in the South African Plio-Pleistocene cercopithecoid record, which provide direct information relevant to the evolution of their endocranial characteristics, few studies have attempted to characterize patterns of external brain morphology in this highly successful primate Superfamily. The availability of non-destructive penetrating radiation imaging systems, together with recently developed computer-based analytical tools, allow for high resolution virtual imaging and modeling of the endocranial casts and thus disclose new perspectives in comparative paleoneurology. Here, we use X-ray microtomographic-based 3D virtual imaging and quantitative analyses to investigate the endocranial organization of 14 cercopithecoid specimens from the South African sites of Makapansgat, Sterkfontein, Swartkrans, and Taung. We present the first detailed comparative description of the external neuroanatomies that characterize these Plio-Pleistocene primates. Along with reconstruction of endocranial volumes, we combine a semi-automatic technique for extracting the neocortical sulcal pattern together with a landmark-free surface deformation method to investigate topographic differences in morphostructural organization. Besides providing and comparing for the first time endocranial volume estimates of extinct Plio-Pleistocene South African cercopithecoid taxa, we report additional information regarding the variation in the sulcal pattern of Theropithecus oswaldi subspecies, and notably of the central sulcus, and the neuroanatomical condition of the colobine taxon Cercopithecoides williamsi, suggested to be similar for some aspects to the papionin pattern, and discuss potential phylogenetic and taxonomic implications. Further research in virtual paleoneurology, applied to specimens from a wider geographic area, is needed to clarify the polarity, intensity, and timing of cortical surface evolution in cercopithecoid lineages.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Encéfalo/anatomia & histologia
Cercopithecus/anatomia & histologia
Fósseis/anatomia & histologia
Crânio/anatomia & histologia
Theropithecus/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: África Austral
Animais
Evolução Biológica
Cercopithecus/classificação
Imagem Tridimensional
Theropithecus/classificação
Microtomografia por Raio-X
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170907
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170907
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161126
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  4 / 97 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27091968
[Au] Autor:Gustison ML; Semple S; Ferrer-I-Cancho R; Bergman TJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109; gustison@umich.edu.
[Ti] Título:Gelada vocal sequences follow Menzerath's linguistic law.
[So] Source:Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A;113(19):E2750-8, 2016 May 10.
[Is] ISSN:1091-6490
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Identifying universal principles underpinning diverse natural systems is a key goal of the life sciences. A powerful approach in addressing this goal has been to test whether patterns consistent with linguistic laws are found in nonhuman animals. Menzerath's law is a linguistic law that states that, the larger the construct, the smaller the size of its constituents. Here, to our knowledge, we present the first evidence that Menzerath's law holds in the vocal communication of a nonhuman species. We show that, in vocal sequences of wild male geladas (Theropithecus gelada), construct size (sequence size in number of calls) is negatively correlated with constituent size (duration of calls). Call duration does not vary significantly with position in the sequence, but call sequence composition does change with sequence size and most call types are abbreviated in larger sequences. We also find that intercall intervals follow the same relationship with sequence size as do calls. Finally, we provide formal mathematical support for the idea that Menzerath's law reflects compression-the principle of minimizing the expected length of a code. Our findings suggest that a common principle underpins human and gelada vocal communication, highlighting the value of exploring the applicability of linguistic laws in vocal systems outside the realm of language.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Algoritmos
Linguística
Modelos Biológicos
Espectrografia do Som/métodos
Theropithecus/fisiologia
Vocalização Animal/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Masculino
Fatores Sexuais
Medida da Produção da Fala/métodos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Mês de entrada:1612
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160420
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1073/pnas.1522072113


  5 / 97 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26790770
[Au] Autor:Gustison ML; Bergman TJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, 530 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.
[Ti] Título:Vocal complexity influences female responses to gelada male calls.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;6:19680, 2016 Jan 21.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Extensive research indicates that inter-sexual selection drives the evolution of complex vocal communication in birds, but parallel lines of evidence are almost entirely absent in mammals. This dearth of evidence, particularly among primates, limits our understanding of the link between sociality and vocal complexity. Here, we use a playback experiment to quantify how wild female geladas (Theropithecus gelada) respond to three call types that are 'derived' (i.e., unique to geladas) and made by males during various affiliative contexts. These derived calls appeared to be highly salient and preferable to females: they looked longer towards and spent more time in proximity to playbacks of male vocal sequences containing one of the derived calls than to sequences containing only common and less elaborate 'grunt' calls. Our results provide the first experimental evidence for vocal elaboration as a male-specific strategy to maintain social bonds with females in non-human primates.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Theropithecus
Vocalização Animal
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Masculino
Orientação
Fatores Sexuais
Fatores de Tempo
Percepção Visual
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Mês de entrada:1701
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/srep19680


  6 / 97 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26581114
[Au] Autor:Gibert L; Scott GR; Scholz D; Budsky A; Ferràndez C; Ribot F; Martin RA; Lería M
[Ad] Endereço:Departament de Geoquímica, Petrologia i Prospecció Geològica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/Martí i Franqués s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: lgibert@ub.edu.
[Ti] Título:Chronology for the Cueva Victoria fossil site (SE Spain): Evidence for Early Pleistocene Afro-Iberian dispersals.
[So] Source:J Hum Evol;90:183-97, 2016 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8606
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Cueva Victoria has provided remains of more than 90 species of fossil vertebrates, including a hominin phalanx, and the only specimens of the African cercopithecid Theropithecus oswaldi in Europe. To constrain the age of the vertebrate remains we used paleomagnetism, vertebrate biostratigraphy and (230)Th/U dating. Normal polarity was identified in the non-fossiliferous lowest and highest stratigraphic units (red clay and capping flowstones) while reverse polarity was found in the intermediate stratigraphic unit (fossiliferous breccia). A lower polarity change occurred during the deposition of the decalcification clay, when the cave was closed and karstification was active. A second polarity change occurred during the capping flowstone formation, when the upper galleries were filled with breccia. The mammal association indicates a post-Jaramillo age, which allows us to correlate this upper reversal with the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary (0.78 Ma). Consequently, the lower reversal (N-R) is interpreted as the end of the Jaramillo magnetochron (0.99 Ma). These ages bracket the age of the fossiliferous breccia between 0.99 and 0.78 Ma, suggesting that the capping flowstone was formed during the wet Marine Isotopic Stage 19, which includes the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary. Fossil remains of Theropithecus have been only found in situ ∼1 m below the B/M boundary, which allows us to place the arrival of Theropithecus to Cueva Victoria at ∼0.9-0.85 Ma. The fauna of Cueva Victoria lived during a period of important climatic change, known as the Early-Middle Pleistocene Climatic Transition. The occurrence of the oldest European Acheulean tools at the contemporaneous nearby site of Cueva Negra suggest an African dispersal into SE Iberia through the Strait of Gibraltar during MIS 22, when sea-level was ∼100 m below its present position, allowing the passage into Europe of, at least, Theropithecus and Homo bearing Acheulean technology.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Fósseis
Hominidae/fisiologia
Theropithecus/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: África do Norte
Migração Animal
Animais
Cavernas
Mamíferos/fisiologia
Espanha
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1610
[Cu] Atualização por classe:161230
[Lr] Data última revisão:
161230
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:151120
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 97 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26119392
[Au] Autor:Barale CL; Rubenstein DI; Beehner JC
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey.
[Ti] Título:Juvenile social relationships reflect adult patterns of behavior in wild geladas.
[So] Source:Am J Primatol;77(10):1086-96, 2015 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2345
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Unlike many mammals, primates spend much of their lives as reproductively-immature juveniles. During the juvenile period, they develop social relationships and physical skills that both facilitate survival to adulthood and impact adult fitness. In this study, we use 2 years of observational data to examine the development of these skills across the juvenile period in a wild cercopithecine primate, the gelada (Theropithecus gelada). As adults, male and female geladas require different skills to be successful; we therefore expected sex differences in social behavior and partner choice during the juvenile period to already reflect these sex-specific trajectories. For example, males, who disperse at puberty and ultimately must challenge other adult males for access to mates, should invest in high-energy play-fighting with other males to develop fighting and rival assessment skills. In contrast, philopatric females, who remain with their close kin throughout their lives, should invest more in forming less-physical and more-social bonds with other females within their group. As predicted, sex differences that foreshadowed sex-specific adult roles were apparent in play rates, the average number of play partners per individual, grooming partner types and social partner preferences. Males played more and had more play partners than same-age females. Males also groomed more often with individuals from outside their natal group than females, although no sex difference was observed in either grooming rates or number of grooming partners per individual. Females stopped playing earlier than males, and instead invested in grooming relationships with close relatives. Additionally, we found that individual play and grooming rates were temporally consistent for both males and females (i.e., from one year to the next year), suggesting that individuals exhibit stable behavioral phenotypes. We conclude by discussing how early life in geladas may shape adult behavior and reproductive strategies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Asseio Animal
Jogos e Brinquedos
Caracteres Sexuais
Comportamento Social
Predomínio Social
Theropithecus/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Fatores Etários
Agressão
Animais
Comportamento Animal
Feminino
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Mês de entrada:1606
[Cu] Atualização por classe:150922
[Lr] Data última revisão:
150922
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:150630
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajp.22443


  8 / 97 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:25716944
[Au] Autor:Nguyen N; Fashing PJ; Boyd DA; Barry TS; Burke RJ; Goodale CB; Jones SC; Kerby JT; Kellogg BS; Lee LM; Miller CM; Nurmi NO; Ramsay MS; Reynolds JD; Stewart KM; Turner TJ; Venkataraman VV; Knauf Y; Roos C; Knauf S
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology, California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, California; Environmental Studies Program, California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, California.
[Ti] Título:Fitness impacts of tapeworm parasitism on wild gelada monkeys at Guassa, Ethiopia.
[So] Source:Am J Primatol;77(5):579-94, 2015 May.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2345
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Parasitism is expected to impact host morbidity or mortality, although the fitness costs of parasitism have rarely been quantified for wildlife hosts. Tapeworms in the genus Taenia exploit a variety of vertebrates, including livestock, humans, and geladas (Theropithecus gelada), monkeys endemic to the alpine grasslands of Ethiopia. Despite Taenia's adverse societal and economic impacts, we know little about the prevalence of disease associated with Taenia infection in wildlife or the impacts of this disease on host health, mortality and reproduction. We monitored geladas at Guassa, Ethiopia over a continuous 6½ year period for external evidence (cysts or coenuri) of Taenia-associated disease (coenurosis) and evaluated the impact of coenurosis on host survival and reproduction. We also identified (through genetic and histological analyses) the tapeworms causing coenurosis in wild geladas at Guassa as Taenia serialis. Nearly 1/3 of adult geladas at Guassa possessed ≥1 coenurus at some point in the study. Coenurosis adversely impacted gelada survival and reproduction at Guassa and this impact spanned two generations: adults with coenuri suffered higher mortality than members of their sex without coenuri and offspring of females with coenuri also suffered higher mortality. Coenurosis also negatively affected adult reproduction, lengthening interbirth intervals and reducing the likelihood that males successfully assumed reproductive control over units of females. Our study provides the first empirical evidence that coenurosis increases mortality and reduces fertility in wild nonhuman primate hosts. Our research highlights the value of longitudinal monitoring of individually recognized animals in natural populations for advancing knowledge of parasite-host evolutionary dynamics and offering clues to the etiology and control of infectious disease.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doenças dos Macacos/parasitologia
Teníase/veterinária
Theropithecus/parasitologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Etiópia/epidemiologia
Feminino
Fertilidade
Masculino
Doenças dos Macacos/epidemiologia
Comportamento Sexual Animal
Taenia/genética
Taenia/isolamento & purificação
Teníase/epidemiologia
Teníase/parasitologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1602
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170418
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170418
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:150227
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajp.22379


  9 / 97 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:25362869
[Au] Autor:Snyder-Mackler N; Alberts SC; Bergman TJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, 130 Science Dr., Durham, NC, USA.
[Ti] Título:The socio-genetics of a complex society: female gelada relatedness patterns mirror association patterns in a multilevel society.
[So] Source:Mol Ecol;23(24):6179-91, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1365-294X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Multilevel societies with fission-fusion dynamics--arguably the most complex animal societies--are defined by two or more nested levels of organization. The core of these societies are modular social units that regularly fission and fuse with one another. Despite convergent evolution in disparate taxa, we know strikingly little about how such societies form and how fitness benefits operate. Understanding the kinship structure of complex societies could inform us about the origins of the social structure as well as about the potential for individuals in these societies to accrue indirect fitness benefits. Here, we combined genetic and behavioural data on geladas (Theropithecus gelada), an Old World Monkey, to complete the most comprehensive socio-genetic analysis of a multilevel society to date. In geladas, individuals in the core social 'units', associate at different frequencies to form 'teams', 'bands' and, the largest aggregations, 'communities'. Units were composed of closely related females, and females remained with their close kin during permanent fissions of units. Interestingly, female-female relatedness also significantly predicted between-unit, between-team and between-band association patterns, while male-male relatedness did not. Thus, it is likely that the socio-genetic structure of gelada society results from females maintaining associations with their female relatives during successive unit fissions--possibly in an attempt to balance the direct and indirect fitness benefits of group living. Overall, the persistence of associations among related females across generations appears to drive the formation of higher levels of gelada society, suggesting that females seek kin for inclusive fitness benefits at multiple levels of gelada society.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal
Comportamento Social
Theropithecus/genética
Theropithecus/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
DNA Mitocondrial/genética
Feminino
Aptidão Genética
Genótipo
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Mitochondrial)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1502
[Cu] Atualização por classe:141223
[Lr] Data última revisão:
141223
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:141104
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/mec.12987


  10 / 97 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:25106818
[Au] Autor:Ferràndez-Cañadell C; Ribot F; Gibert L
[Ad] Endereço:Department d'Estratigrafia, Paleontologia i Geociències Marines, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí Franquès s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: carlesferrandez@ub.edu.
[Ti] Título:New fossil teeth of Theropithecus oswaldi (Cercopithecoidea) from the Early Pleistocene at Cueva Victoria (SE Spain).
[So] Source:J Hum Evol;74:55-66, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8606
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The presence of Theropithecus oswaldi in Europe was first reported in 1995 from the Early Pleistocene site of Cueva Victoria (SE Spain), showing the dispersal of this genus above 30° north latitude and into Europe. Later claims of the presence in Italy of Theropithecus in the Early Pleistocene, based on vertebral remains, are controversial. Here we report four additional teeth of T. oswaldi from Cueva Victoria. These and the previously described tooth correspond to a minimum of two individuals. The presence of T. oswaldi in North Africa and SE Iberia during the Early Pleistocene suggests a possible faunal dispersal from Africa into Europe through the Straits of Gibraltar, which would have acted as a filter bridge.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fósseis/anatomia & histologia
Theropithecus/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Distribuição Animal
Animais
Fósseis/ultraestrutura
Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura
Espanha
Dente/anatomia & histologia
Dente/ultraestrutura
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1504
[Cu] Atualização por classe:140902
[Lr] Data última revisão:
140902
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:140810
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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