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  1 / 471 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28379987
[Au] Autor:Buttelmann D; Buttelmann F; Carpenter M; Call J; Tomasello M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, Leipzig, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Great apes distinguish true from false beliefs in an interactive helping task.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(4):e0173793, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Understanding the behavior of others in a wide variety of circumstances requires an understanding of their psychological states. Humans' nearest primate relatives, the great apes, understand many psychological states of others, for example, perceptions, goals, and desires. However, so far there is little evidence that they possess the key marker of advanced human social cognition: an understanding of false beliefs. Here we demonstrate that in a nonverbal (implicit) false-belief test which is passed by human 1-year-old infants, great apes as a group, including chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), bonobos (Pan paniscus), and orangutans (Pongo abelii), distinguish between true and false beliefs in their helping behavior. Great apes thus may possess at least some basic understanding that an agent's actions are based on her beliefs about reality. Hence, such understanding might not be the exclusive province of the human species.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Hominidae/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Cognição/fisiologia
Compreensão/fisiologia
Cultura
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Masculino
Pan paniscus/psicologia
Pan troglodytes/psicologia
Pongo abelii/psicologia
Comportamento Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170830
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170830
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170406
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0173793


  2 / 471 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28348269
[Au] Autor:Wroblewski EE; Guethlein LA; Norman PJ; Li Y; Shaw CM; Han AS; Ndjango JN; Ahuka-Mundeke S; Georgiev AV; Peeters M; Hahn BH; Parham P
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305; eewro1@stanford.edu peropa@stanford.edu.
[Ti] Título:Bonobos Maintain Immune System Diversity with Three Functional Types of MHC-B.
[So] Source:J Immunol;198(9):3480-3493, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:1550-6606
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Fast-evolving MHC class I polymorphism serves to diversify NK cell and CD8 T cell responses in individuals, families, and populations. Because only chimpanzee and bonobo have strict orthologs of all , their study gives unique perspectives on the human condition. We defined polymorphism of , the bonobo ortholog of , for six wild bonobo populations. Sequences for exon 2 and 3 were determined from the genomic DNA in 255 fecal samples, minimally representing 110 individuals. Twenty-two alleles were defined, each encoding a different Papa-B protein. No Papa-B is identical to any chimpanzee Patr-B, human HLA-B, or gorilla Gogo-B. Phylogenetic analysis identified a clade of MHC-B, defined by residues 45-74 of the α domain, which is broadly conserved among bonobo, chimpanzee, and gorilla. Bonobo populations have 3-14 Papa-B allotypes. Three Papa-B are in all populations, and they are each of a different functional type: allotypes having the Bw4 epitope recognized by killer cell Ig-like receptors of NK cells, allotypes having the C1 epitope also recognized by killer cell Ig-like receptors, and allotypes having neither epitope. For population Malebo, these three Papa-B are the only Papa-B allotypes. Although small in number, their sequence divergence is such that the nucleotide diversity (mean proportional distance) of in Malebo is greater than in the other populations and is also greater than expected for random combinations of three Overall, has substantially less diversity than in chimpanzee subspecies and in indigenous human populations, consistent with bonobo having experienced narrower population bottlenecks.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Classe I/genética
Sistema Imunitário
Epitopos Imunodominantes/genética
Células Matadoras Naturais/imunologia
Pan paniscus
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Evolução Biológica
Frequência do Gene
Genótipo
Gorilla gorilla
Antígenos HLA-B/genética
Seres Humanos
Pan troglodytes
Filogenia
Polimorfismo Genético
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (HLA-B Antigens); 0 (Histocompatibility Antigens Class I); 0 (Immunodominant Epitopes)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171107
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171107
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170329
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.1601955


  3 / 471 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28323346
[Au] Autor:Schneider C; Liebal K; Call J
[Ad] Endereço:School of Psychology, University of East London, London, UK.
[Ti] Título:"Giving" and "responding" differences in gestural communication between nonhuman great ape mothers and infants.
[So] Source:Dev Psychobiol;59(3):303-313, 2017 04.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2302
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In the first comparative analysis of its kind, we investigated gesture behavior and response patterns in 25 captive ape mother-infant dyads (six bonobos, eight chimpanzees, three gorillas, and eight orangutans). We examined (i) how frequently mothers and infants gestured to each other and to other group members; and (ii) to what extent infants and mothers responded to the gestural attempts of others. Our findings confirmed the hypothesis that bonobo mothers were more proactive in their gesturing to their infants than the other species. Yet mothers (from all four species) often did not respond to the gestures of their infants and other group members. In contrast, infants "pervasively" responded to gestures they received from their mothers and other group members. We propose that infants' pervasive responsiveness rather than the quality of mother investment and her responsiveness may be crucial to communication development in nonhuman great apes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comunicação Animal
Gestos
Hominidae/fisiologia
Mães
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Gorilla gorilla
Pan paniscus
Pan troglodytes
Pongo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171122
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171122
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170322
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/dev.21495


  4 / 471 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28282382
[Au] Autor:McManus KF; Taravella AM; Henn BM; Bustamante CD; Sikora M; Cornejo OE
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Population genetic analysis of the DARC locus (Duffy) reveals adaptation from standing variation associated with malaria resistance in humans.
[So] Source:PLoS Genet;13(3):e1006560, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7404
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The human DARC (Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines) gene encodes a membrane-bound chemokine receptor crucial for the infection of red blood cells by Plasmodium vivax, a major causative agent of malaria. Of the three major allelic classes segregating in human populations, the FY*O allele has been shown to protect against P. vivax infection and is at near fixation in sub-Saharan Africa, while FY*B and FY*A are common in Europe and Asia, respectively. Due to the combination of strong geographic differentiation and association with malaria resistance, DARC is considered a canonical example of positive selection in humans. Despite this, details of the timing and mode of selection at DARC remain poorly understood. Here, we use sequencing data from over 1,000 individuals in twenty-one human populations, as well as ancient human genomes, to perform a fine-scale investigation of the evolutionary history of DARC. We estimate the time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of the most common FY*O haplotype to be 42 kya (95% CI: 34-49 kya). We infer the FY*O null mutation swept to fixation in Africa from standing variation with very low initial frequency (0.1%) and a selection coefficient of 0.043 (95% CI:0.011-0.18), which is among the strongest estimated in the human genome. We estimate the TMRCA of the FY*A mutation in non-Africans to be 57 kya (95% CI: 48-65 kya) and infer that, prior to the sweep of FY*O, all three alleles were segregating in Africa, as highly diverged populations from Asia and ≠Khomani San hunter-gatherers share the same FY*A haplotypes. We test multiple models of admixture that may account for this observation and reject recent Asian or European admixture as the cause.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Resistência à Doença/genética
Sistema do Grupo Sanguíneo Duffy/genética
Genética Populacional
Malária Vivax/genética
Receptores de Superfície Celular/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: África
Alelos
Animais
Ásia
Sistema do Grupo Sanguíneo Duffy/metabolismo
Frequência do Gene
Genoma Humano
Geografia
Gorilla gorilla
Haplótipos
Seres Humanos
Mutação
Pan paniscus
Pan troglodytes
Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
Pongo
Regiões Promotoras Genéticas
Receptores de Superfície Celular/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DARC protein, human); 0 (Duffy Blood-Group System); 0 (Receptors, Cell Surface)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170606
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170606
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170311
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pgen.1006560


  5 / 471 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28276048
[Au] Autor:Moscovice LR; Douglas PH; Martinez-Iñigo L; Surbeck M; Vigilant L; Hohmann G
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, 04133, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Stable and fluctuating social preferences and implications for cooperation among female bonobos at LuiKotale, Salonga National Park, DRC.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;163(1):158-172, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: Female bonobos (Pan paniscus) are characterized as highly affiliative and cooperative, but few studies have quantified the strength and stability of female intra-sexual relationships or explored how variation in social relationships influences cooperation. We measure female social preferences, identify causes of variation in preferences, and test whether variation in social preferences predicts food sharing or coalitionary support. METHODS: Data were collected over 3 years from females in the Bompusa community at LuiKotale, DRC. We measured genetic relatedness and constructed social preference indices for party association, proximity, grooming, GG-rubbing and aggression. We identified preferred social partners based on permutation tests and measured stability using Mantel tests. We used factor analysis to identify inter-relationships between preference indices and used LMMs to test whether variation in social preferences was explained by relatedness, rank differences, having dependent young or co-residency time. We used GLMMs to test whether variation in social preferences predicted food sharing or coalitionary support. RESULTS: All females had preferred non-kin partners for proximity, grooming or GG-rubbing, but only grooming preferences were stable across years. Association indices were higher among lactating females, and aggression was lower among females with longer co-residency times. The factor analysis identified one factor, representing proximity and GG-rubbing preferences, labeled behavioral coordination. Dyads with higher levels of behavioral coordination were more likely to share food. CONCLUSIONS: Female bonobos exhibit stable, differentiated grooming relationships outside of kinship and philopatry. Females also exhibit flexible proximity and GG-rubbing preferences that may facilitate cooperation with a wider range of social partners.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Cooperativo
Pan paniscus
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antropologia Física
DNA Mitocondrial/genética
República Democrática do Congo
Comportamento Alimentar
Feminino
Asseio Animal
Pan paniscus/classificação
Pan paniscus/genética
Pan paniscus/fisiologia
Comportamento Sexual Animal
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Mitochondrial)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170609
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170609
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170310
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23197


  6 / 471 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28250455
[Au] Autor:Kehr B; Helgadottir A; Melsted P; Jonsson H; Helgason H; Jonasdottir A; Jonasdottir A; Sigurdsson A; Gylfason A; Halldorsson GH; Kristmundsdottir S; Thorgeirsson G; Olafsson I; Holm H; Thorsteinsdottir U; Sulem P; Helgason A; Gudbjartsson DF; Halldorsson BV; Stefansson K
[Ad] Endereço:deCODE Genetics/Amgen, Inc., Reykjavik, Iceland.
[Ti] Título:Diversity in non-repetitive human sequences not found in the reference genome.
[So] Source:Nat Genet;49(4):588-593, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1546-1718
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Genomes usually contain some non-repetitive sequences that are missing from the reference genome and occur only in a population subset. Such non-repetitive, non-reference (NRNR) sequences have remained largely unexplored in terms of their characterization and downstream analyses. Here we describe 3,791 breakpoint-resolved NRNR sequence variants called using PopIns from whole-genome sequence data of 15,219 Icelanders. We found that over 95% of the 244 NRNR sequences that are 200 bp or longer are present in chimpanzees, indicating that they are ancestral. Furthermore, 149 variant loci are in linkage disequilibrium (r > 0.8) with a genome-wide association study (GWAS) catalog marker, suggesting disease relevance. Additionally, we report an association (P = 3.8 × 10 , odds ratio (OR) = 0.92) with myocardial infarction (23,360 cases, 300,771 controls) for a 766-bp NRNR sequence variant. Our results underline the importance of including variation of all complexity levels when searching for variants that associate with disease.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Sequência de Bases/genética
Variação Genética/genética
Genoma Humano/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética
Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos
Genótipo
Seres Humanos
Desequilíbrio de Ligação/genética
Infarto do Miocárdio/genética
Pan paniscus/genética
Fenótipo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170906
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170906
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170303
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/ng.3801


  7 / 471 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27977913
[Au] Autor:Yamamoto S
[Ad] Endereço:Graduate School of Intercultural Studies, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan.
[Ti] Título:Primate empathy: three factors and their combinations for empathy-related phenomena.
[So] Source:Wiley Interdiscip Rev Cogn Sci;8(3), 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1939-5086
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Empathy as a research topic is receiving increasing attention, although there seems some confusion on the definition of empathy across different fields. Frans de Waal (de Waal FBM. Putting the altruism back into altruism: the evolution of empathy. Annu Rev Psychol 2008, 59:279-300. doi:10.1146/annurev.psych.59.103006.093625) used empathy as an umbrella term and proposed a comprehensive model for the evolution of empathy with some of its basic elements in nonhuman animals. In de Waal's model, empathy consists of several layers distinguished by required cognitive levels; the perception-action mechanism plays the core role for connecting ourself and others. Then, human-like empathy such as perspective-taking develops in outer layers according to cognitive sophistication, leading to prosocial acts such as targeted helping. I agree that animals demonstrate many empathy-related phenomena; however, the species differences and the level of cognitive sophistication of the phenomena might be interpreted in another way than this simple linearly developing model. Our recent studies with chimpanzees showed that their perspective-taking ability does not necessarily lead to proactive helping behavior. Herein, as a springboard for further studies, I reorganize the empathy-related phenomena by proposing a combination model instead of the linear development model. This combination model is composed of three organizing factors: matching with others, understanding of others, and prosociality. With these three factors and their combinations, most empathy-related matters can be categorized and mapped to appropriate context; this may be a good first step to discuss the evolution of empathy in relation to the neural connections in human and nonhuman animal brains. I would like to propose further comparative studies, especially from the viewpoint of Homo-Pan (chimpanzee and bonobo) comparison. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1431. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1431 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Cognição
Empatia
Modelos Psicológicos
Primatas/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Animal
Comportamento de Ajuda
Seres Humanos
Pan paniscus
Pan troglodytes
Comportamento Social
Especificidade da Espécie
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170504
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170504
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/wcs.1431


  8 / 471 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27783254
[Au] Autor:Tokuyama N; Moore DL; Graham KE; Lokasola A; Furuichi T
[Ad] Endereço:Primate Research Institute, University of Kyoto, Inuyama, Aichi, 484-8506, Japan. Tokuyama.nahoko.47x@kyoto-u.jp.
[Ti] Título:Cases of maternal cannibalism in wild bonobos (Pan paniscus) from two different field sites, Wamba and Kokolopori, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
[So] Source:Primates;58(1):7-12, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1610-7365
[Cp] País de publicação:Japan
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Maternal cannibalism, whereby a mother consumes her own offspring, occurs in various animal taxa and is commonly explained by nutritional stress or environmental pressures. It is rare in nonhuman primates and is considered an aberrant behavior only observed under high-stress conditions. It was therefore surprising when, in the first reported case of cannibalism in wild bonobos, a mother consumed part of the dead infant at LuiKotale. Here we report two more cases of maternal cannibalism by wild bonobos at two different study sites, Wamba and Kokolopori. The dead infants' mothers participated in the cannibalism in both cases. At Kokolopori, although the mother did consume part of the carcass, it was held and shared by another dominant female. At Wamba, the mother was a dominant female within the community and was the primary consumer of the carcass. In both cases, cannibalism resembled other meat-eating events, with the dominant female controlling meat consumption. Infanticide was not observed in either case, but its occurrence could not be ruled out. Although rare, the occurrence of maternal cannibalism at three different study sites suggests that this may represent part of the behavioral repertoire of bonobos, rather than an aberrant behavior.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Canibalismo
Pan paniscus/fisiologia
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Carnivoridade
Morte
República Democrática do Congo
Feminino
Hierarquia Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171014
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171014
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161027
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10329-016-0582-7


  9 / 471 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27886808
[Au] Autor:Oelze VM; Fahy G; Hohmann G; Robbins MM; Leinert V; Lee K; Eshuis H; Seiler N; Wessling EG; Head J; Boesch C; Kühl HS
[Ad] Endereço:Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Primatology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany; German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5e, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: viktoria_oelze@eva.mpg.de.
[Ti] Título:Comparative isotope ecology of African great apes.
[So] Source:J Hum Evol;101:1-16, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8606
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The isotope ecology of great apes is a useful reference for palaeodietary reconstructions in fossil hominins. As extant apes live in C -dominated habitats, variation in isotope signatures is assumed to be low compared to hominoids exploiting C -plant resources. However, isotopic differences between sites and between and within individuals are poorly understood due to the lack of vegetation baseline data. In this comparative study, we included all species of free-ranging African great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla sp.). First, we explore differences in isotope baselines across different habitats and whether isotopic signatures in apes can be related to feeding niches (faunivory and folivory). Secondly, we illustrate how stable isotopic variations within African ape populations compare to other extant and extinct primates and discuss possible implications for dietary flexibility. Using 701 carbon and nitrogen isotope data points resulting from 148 sectioned hair samples and an additional collection of 189 fruit samples, we compare six different great ape sites. We investigate the relationship between vegetation baselines and climatic variables, and subsequently correct great ape isotope data to a standardized plant baseline from the respective sites. We obtained temporal isotopic profiles of individual animals by sectioning hair along its growth trajectory. Isotopic signatures of great apes differed between sites, mainly as vegetation isotope baselines were correlated with site-specific climatic conditions. We show that controlling for plant isotopic characteristics at a given site is essential for faunal data interpretation. While accounting for plant baseline effects, we found distinct isotopic profiles for each great ape population. Based on evidence from habituated groups and sympatric great ape species, these differences could possibly be related to faunivory and folivory. Dietary flexibility in apes varied, but temporal variation was overall lower than in fossil hominins and extant baboons, shifting from C to C -resources, providing new perspectives on comparisons between extinct and extant primates.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Isótopos de Carbono/análise
Dieta
Gorilla gorilla/fisiologia
Cabelo/química
Isótopos de Nitrogênio/análise
Pan paniscus/fisiologia
Pan troglodytes/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ecologia
Comportamento Alimentar
Fósseis
Frutas/anatomia & histologia
Papio
Plantas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Carbon Isotopes); 0 (Nitrogen Isotopes)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170907
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170907
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161126
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  10 / 471 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27870347
[Au] Autor:Pryor McIntosh L; Strait DS; Ledogar JA; Smith AL; Ross CF; Wang Q; Opperman LA; Dechow PC
[Ad] Endereço:School of Science and Mathematics, Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, Tifton, Georgia, 31793.
[Ti] Título:Internal Bone Architecture in the Zygoma of Human and Pan.
[So] Source:Anat Rec (Hoboken);299(12):1704-1717, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1932-8494
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The internal and external anatomy of the primate zygoma is central to orofacial function, health, and disease. The importance of variation in its gross morphology across extinct and extant primate forms has been established using finite element analysis, but its internal structure has yet to be explored. In this study, µCT is used to characterize trabecular bone morphometry in two separate regions of the zygoma of humans and Pan. Trabecular anisotropy and orientation are compared with strain orientations observed in trabecular regions of finite element models of four Pan crania. The results of this study show that trabecular bone morphometry, anisotropy, and orientation are highly compatible with strain orientation and magnitude in the finite element models. Trabecular bone in the zygoma is largely orthotropic (with bone orientation differing in three mutually orthogonal directions), with its primary orientation lying in the mediolateral direction. Trabecular bone in the zygomatic region appears to be highly influenced by the local strain environment, and thus may be closely linked to orofacial function. Anat Rec, 299:1704-1717, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Osso Esponjoso/anatomia & histologia
Pan paniscus/anatomia & histologia
Pan troglodytes/anatomia & histologia
Zigoma/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Densidade Óssea
Osso Esponjoso/diagnóstico por imagem
Seres Humanos
Microtomografia por Raio-X
Zigoma/diagnóstico por imagem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170724
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170724
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ar.23499



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