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Pissinatti, Alcides
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[PMID]:29236726
[Au] Autor:Strier KB; Possamai CB; Tabacow FP; Pissinatti A; Lanna AM; Rodrigues de Melo F; Moreira L; Talebi M; Breves P; Mendes SL; Jerusalinsky L
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Demographic monitoring of wild muriqui populations: Criteria for defining priority areas and monitoring intensity.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0188922, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Demographic data are essential to assessments of the status of endangered species. However, establishing an integrated monitoring program to obtain useful data on contemporary and future population trends requires both the identification of priority areas and populations and realistic evaluations of the kinds of data that can be obtained under different monitoring regimes. We analyzed all known populations of a critically endangered primate, the muriqui (genus: Brachyteles) using population size, genetic uniqueness, geographic importance (including potential importance in corridor programs) and implementability scores to define monitoring priorities. Our analyses revealed nine priority populations for the northern muriqui (B. hypoxanthus) and nine for the southern muriqui (B. arachnoides). In addition, we employed knowledge of muriqui developmental and life history characteristics to define the minimum monitoring intensity needed to evaluate demographic trends along a continuum ranging from simple descriptive changes in population size to predictions of population changes derived from individual based life histories. Our study, stimulated by the Brazilian government's National Action Plan for the Conservation of Muriquis, is fundamental to meeting the conservation goals for this genus, and also provides a model for defining priorities and methods for the implementation of integrated demographic monitoring programs for other endangered and critically endangered species of primates.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Animais Selvagens
Atelinae
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Espécies em Perigo de Extinção
Monitoramento Ambiental
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Demografia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188922


  2 / 186 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28186699
[Au] Autor:Cartagena-Matos B; Gasnier T; Cravo-Mota M; Martins Bezerra B
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.
[Ti] Título:Activity budget and social interactions in semi-captive gray woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha cana) living in an ex situ conservation area in Central Amazonia.
[So] Source:Zoo Biol;36(1):21-29, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2361
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Areas holding primates in semi-captivity conditions represent an excellent opportunity for collecting data on rare, little known, and endangered taxa, contributing with insightful information to help in their conservation. Here, we present information on the activity budget and social interactions of the elusive gray woolly monkeys, Lagothrix lagotricha cana, in an ex situ conservation area in central Amazonia. We studied the behavior of 18 semi-captive individuals through instantaneous scan and focal animal samplings during 4 months in the wet season. The most frequent activity registered was resting (45%). The remaining time was dedicated to foraging (29%), travelling (23%), social interactions (3%), and self-grooming (1%). Resting and travelling time may be correlated to fruit availability in the area through different seasons. Huddling was the most frequent social interaction, being more common from young individuals toward adult females, which may be associated with breastfeeding. Playing was more common among young males. This activity prepares them to defend themselves from possible attacks and allows them to develop their role in the social group, as future adult males. Aggression was most frequent among adults, primarily from males toward females, likely to demonstrate their dominance over females. Social grooming occurred predominantly from mother to offspring. This interaction can reduce the risk of young predation, directly increasing the female reproductive success. Our data not only add to our understanding of the sociality and behaviors of the genus Lagothrix, but may also serve as a tool to identify environments that support an adequate activity budget for these monkeys. Zoo Biol. 36:21-29, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atelinae/fisiologia
Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Atividade Motora/fisiologia
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Brasil
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Feminino
Masculino
Jogos e Brinquedos
Fatores Sexuais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1702
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170221
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170221
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170211
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/zoo.21333


  3 / 186 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28160144
[Au] Autor:Eberle R; Black DH
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 74078, USA. r.eberle@okstate.edu.
[Ti] Título:Sequence of the ateline alphaherpesvirus 1 (HVA1) genome.
[So] Source:Arch Virol;162(5):1423-1425, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1432-8798
[Cp] País de publicação:Austria
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Here, we report the genome sequence of a spider monkey alphaherpesvirus (ateline alphaherpesvirus 1, HVA1) and compare it with that of other primate alphaherpesviruses. The HVA1 genome is 147,346 bp long and contains 67 predicted ORFs. The genetic layout of the HVA1 genome is similar to that of the squirrel monkey alphaherpesvirus (saimirine alphaherpesvirus 1, HVS1) in that it lacks inverted repeat regions flanking the unique long region and homologues of the UL43, UL49.5, US8.5 and US10-12 genes. Unlike HVS1, HVA1 also lacks a homologue of the RL1 (γ34.5) gene and a replication origin near the end of the genome. Consistent with previous phylogenetic analyses, all predicted proteins of HVA1 are most closely related to those of HVS1.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Alphaherpesvirinae/genética
Atelinae/virologia
DNA Viral/genética
Genoma Viral/genética
Infecções por Herpesviridae/veterinária
Proteínas Virais/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Alphaherpesvirinae/classificação
Alphaherpesvirinae/isolamento & purificação
Sequência de Aminoácidos
Animais
Sequência de Bases
Infecções por Herpesviridae/virologia
Origem de Replicação/genética
Homologia de Sequência de Aminoácidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Viral); 0 (Viral Proteins)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170428
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170428
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170205
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00705-017-3249-9


  4 / 186 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28135714
[Au] Autor:Parada-López J; Valenta K; Chapman CA; Reyna-Hurtado R
[Ad] Endereço:Instituto de Neuroetología, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Mexico.
[Ti] Título:Spider Monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) Travel to Resting Trees in a Seasonal Forest of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.
[So] Source:Folia Primatol (Basel);87(6):375-380, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1421-9980
[Cp] País de publicação:Switzerland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Resting by primates is considered an understudied activity, relative to feeding or moving, despite its importance in physiological and time investment terms. Here we describe spider monkeys' (Ateles geoffroyi) travel from feeding to resting trees in a seasonal tropical forest of the Yucatan Peninsula. We followed adult and subadult individuals for as long as possible, recording their activities and spatial location to construct travel paths. Spider monkeys spent 44% of the total sampling time resting. In 49% of the cases, spider monkeys fed and subsequently rested in the same tree, whereas in the remaining cases they travelled a mean distance of 108.3 m. Spider monkeys showed high linear paths (mean linearity index = 0.77) to resting trees when they travelled longer distances than their visual field, which suggests travel efficiency and reduced travel cost. Resting activity is time consuming and affects the time available to search for food and engage in social interactions.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atelinae/fisiologia
Descanso/fisiologia
Comportamento Espacial
Árvores
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Alimentar
Florestas
México
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170406
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170406
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1159/000455122


  5 / 186 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27686380
[Au] Autor:Hale VL; Tan CL; Niu K; Yang Y; Cui D; Zhao H; Knight R; Amato KR
[Ad] Endereço:Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906, USA. Electronic address: vreynolds@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Effects of field conditions on fecal microbiota.
[So] Source:J Microbiol Methods;130:180-188, 2016 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8359
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Gut microbiota can provide great insight into host health, and studies of the gut microbiota in wildlife are becoming more common. However, the effects of field conditions on gut microbial samples are unknown. This study addresses the following questions: 1) How do environmental factors such as sunlight and insect infestations affect fecal microbial DNA? 2) How does fecal microbial DNA change over time after defecation? 3) How does storage method affect microbial DNA? Fresh fecal samples were collected, pooled, and homogenized from a family group of 6 spider monkeys, Ateles geoffroyi. Samples were then aliquoted and subjected to varying light conditions (shade, sun), insect infestations (limited or not limited by netting over the sample), and sample preservation methods (FTA - Fast Technology for Analysis of nucleic acid - cards, or freezing in liquid nitrogen then storing at -20°C). Changes in the microbial communities under these conditions were assessed over 24h. Time and preservation method both effected fecal microbial community diversity and composition. The effect size of these variables was then assessed in relation to fecal microbial samples from 2 other primate species (Rhinopithecus bieti and R. brelichi) housed at different captive institutions. While the microbial community of each primate species was significantly different, the effects of time and preservation method still remained significant indicating that these effects are important considerations for fieldwork.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Meio Ambiente
Fezes/microbiologia
Microbioma Gastrointestinal
Preservação Biológica/métodos
Manejo de Espécimes/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Atelinae/microbiologia
Biodiversidade
Classificação
DNA Bacteriano/genética
Defecação
Congelamento
Pessoal de Saúde
Insetos
Ácidos Nucleicos/análise
RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética
Manejo de Espécimes/efeitos adversos
Luz Solar
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Bacterial); 0 (Nucleic Acids); 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161001
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  6 / 186 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27280800
[Au] Autor:Smith-Aguilar SE; Ramos-Fernández G; Getz WM
[Ad] Endereço:Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigación para el Desarrollo Integral Regional Unidad Oaxaca, Santa Cruz Xoxocotlán, Oaxaca, México.
[Ti] Título:Seasonal Changes in Socio-Spatial Structure in a Group of Free-Living Spider Monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi).
[So] Source:PLoS One;11(6):e0157228, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Ecological and social factors influence individual movement and group membership decisions, which ultimately determine how animal groups adjust their behavior in spatially and temporally heterogeneous environments. The mechanisms behind these behavioral adjustments can be better understood by studying the relationship between association and space use patterns of groups and how these change over time. We examined the socio-spatial patterns of adult individuals in a free-ranging group of spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi), a species with high fission-fusion dynamics. Data comprised 4916 subgroup scans collected during 325 days throughout a 20-month period and was used to evaluate changes from fruit-scarce to fruit-abundant periods in individual core-area size, subgroup size and two types of association measures: spatial (core-area overlap) and spatio-temporal (occurrence in the same subgroup) associations. We developed a 3-level analysis framework to distinguish passive associations, where individuals are mostly brought together by resources of common interest, from active association, where individuals actively seek or avoid certain others. Results indicated a more concentrated use of space, increased individual gregariousness and higher spatio-temporal association rates in the fruit-abundant seasons, as is compatible with an increase in passive associations. Nevertheless, results also suggested active associations in all the periods analyzed, although associations differed across seasons. In particular, females seem to actively avoid males, perhaps prompted by an increased probability of random encounters among individuals, resulting from the contraction of individual core areas. Our framework proved useful in investigating the interplay between ecological and social constraints and how these constraints can influence individual ranging and grouping decisions in spider monkeys, and possibly other species with high fission-fusion dynamics.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atelinae/fisiologia
Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Estações do Ano
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170714
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170714
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160610
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0157228


  7 / 186 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27265521
[Au] Autor:Talebi MG; Sala EA; Carvalho B; Villani GM; Lucas PW; van Casteren A
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Environmental Sciences, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Campus Diadema, Rua São Nicolau, 210, Centro, Cep 09913-030, Diadema, SP, Brazil; Conservation & Research of Southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest, Pró-Muriqui Association, Sao Miguel Arcanjo, SP, Brazil. Electronic address: t
[Ti] Título:Membrane-plate transition in leaves as an influence on dietary selectivity and tooth form.
[So] Source:J Hum Evol;98:18-26, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8606
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Primates need accurate sensory signals about food quality to forage efficiently. Current evidence suggests that they target leaf foods based on color at long-range, reinforcing this with post-ingestive sensations relating to leaf toughness evoked during chewing. Selection against tough leaves effectively selects against high fiber content, which in turn gives a greater opportunity of acquiring protein. Here we consider a novel intermediate mechanical factor that could aid a folivore: leaves may transform mechanically from membranes (sheets that cannot maintain their shape under gravitational loads and thus 'flop') early on in development into plates (that can maintain their shape) as they mature. This transformation can be detected visually. Mechanical tests on two species of leaf eaten by southern muriqui monkeys (Brachyteles arachnoides) in Southern Atlantic Forest, Brazil, support a membrane-to-plate shift in turgid leaves during their development. A measure of this mechanical transition, termed lambda (λ), was found to correlate with both leaf color and toughness, thus supporting a potential role in leaf selection. Muriquis appear to select membranous leaves, but they also eat leaves that are plate-like. We attribute this to the degree of cresting of their molar teeth. A dietary choice restricted to membranous leaves might typify the type of 'fallback' leaf that even frugivorous primates will target because membranes of low toughness are relatively easily chewed. This may be relevant to the diets of hominins because these lack the bladed postcanine teeth seen in mammals with a specialized folivorous diet. We suggest that mammals with such dental adaptations can consume tougher leaf 'plates' than others.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atelinae/anatomia & histologia
Atelinae/fisiologia
Dieta
Comportamento Alimentar
Folhas de Planta/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Fenômenos Biomecânicos
Brasil
Mastigação
Dente/anatomia & histologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170921
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170921
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160607
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 186 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27224026
[Au] Autor:Delezene LK; Teaford MF; Ungar PS
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 72701.
[Ti] Título:Canine and incisor microwear in pitheciids and Ateles reflects documented patterns of tooth use.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;161(1):6-25, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: Platyrrhine species differ in the extent to and the manner in which they use their incisors and canines during food ingestion. For example, Ateles uses its anterior teeth to process mechanically nondemanding soft fruits, while the sclerocarp-harvesting pitheciids rely extensively on these teeth to acquire and process more demanding foods. Pitheciids themselves vary in anterior tooth use, with the pitheciines (Cacajao, Chiropotes, and Pithecia) noted to use their robust canines in a variety of ways to predate seeds, while Callicebus, which rarely predates seeds, uses its incisors and exceptionally short canines to scrape tough mesocarp from fruits. To investigate the relationship between tooth use and dental wear, microwear textures were investigated for the anterior teeth of these five genera of platyrrhine primates. METHODS: Using a white light confocal microscope, 12 microwear texture attributes that reflect feature size, anisotropy, density, and complexity were recorded from high-resolution epoxy casts of the incisors and canines of adult wild-collected Brazilian specimens of Ateles, Callicebus, Cacajao, Chiropotes, and Pithecia. RESULTS: Pitheciine canines tend to have deep microwear features and complex, anisotropic microwear textures, while Ateles anterior teeth tend to have very small features, low feature density, and less complex and anisotropic surfaces. Callicebus incisor and canine microwear is generally intermediate in size and complexity between those extremes. CONCLUSIONS: These findings align with expectations from reported field observations of tooth use and illustrate the potential for using microwear texture analysis to infer patterns of anterior tooth use in extinct primates. Am J Phys Anthropol 161:6-25, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atelinae/fisiologia
Dente Canino/patologia
Dieta
Incisivo/patologia
Pitheciidae/fisiologia
Desgaste dos Dentes/patologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antropologia Física
Brasil
Frutas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170609
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170609
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160526
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23002


  9 / 186 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27097655
[Au] Autor:Loza-Rubio E; Rojas-Anaya E; López-Ramírez Rdel C; Saiz JC; Escribano-Romero E
[Ad] Endereço:Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Agrícolas,Forestales y Pecuarias (CENID-Microbiología),Carretera México-Toluca Km 15·5,Colonia Palo Alto,CP 05110,México DF,Mexico.
[Ti] Título:Prevalence of neutralizing antibodies against West Nile virus (WNV) in monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi and Alouatta pigra) and crocodiles (Crocodylus acutus and C. acutus-C. moreletti hybrids) in Mexico.
[So] Source:Epidemiol Infect;144(11):2371-3, 2016 08.
[Is] ISSN:1469-4409
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne neurotropic viral pathogen maintained in an enzootic cycle between mosquitoes (vectors) and birds (natural hosts) with equids, humans, and other vertebrates acting as dead-end hosts. WNV activity in Mexico has been reported in several domestic and wild fauna and in humans, and the virus has been isolated from birds, mosquitoes, and humans. However, no serological studies have been conducted in monkeys, and only two in a limited number of crocodiles (Crocodylus moreletii). Here we present data on the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies against WNV in 53 healthy wild monkeys (49 Ateles geoffroyi and four Alouatta pigra), and 80 semi-captive healthy crocodiles (60 C. acutus and 20 C. acutus-C. moreletti hybrids) sampled during 2012. None of the monkey sera neutralized WNV, whereas 55% of the crocodile sera presented neutralizing antibodies against WNV. These results can contribute to the design of surveillance programmes in Mexico.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Jacarés e Crocodilos
Alouatta
Anticorpos Neutralizantes/sangue
Anticorpos Antivirais/sangue
Atelinae
Doenças dos Macacos/epidemiologia
Febre do Nilo Ocidental/veterinária
Vírus do Nilo Ocidental/isolamento & purificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Monitoramento Epidemiológico
México/epidemiologia
Doenças dos Macacos/imunologia
Doenças dos Macacos/virologia
Prevalência
Febre do Nilo Ocidental/epidemiologia
Febre do Nilo Ocidental/imunologia
Febre do Nilo Ocidental/virologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antibodies, Neutralizing); 0 (Antibodies, Viral)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171124
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171124
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160422
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0950268816000790


  10 / 186 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27093602
[Au] Autor:Marsh C; Link A; King-Bailey G; Donati G
[Ad] Endereço:Faculty of Science and Technology, Bournemouth University, Poole, UK.
[Ti] Título:Effects of Fragment and Vegetation Structure on the Population Abundance of Ateles hybridus, Alouatta seniculus and Cebus albifrons in Magdalena Valley, Colombia.
[So] Source:Folia Primatol (Basel);87(1):17-30, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1421-9980
[Cp] País de publicação:Switzerland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Many primate species currently subsist in fragmented and anthropogenically disturbed habitats. Different threats arise depending on the species' life history strategy, dietary requirements and habitat preference. Additionally, anthropogenic disturbance is far from uniform and may affect individual forest fragments in a single landscape in differing ways. We studied the effects of fragmentation on three species of diurnal primate, Cebus albifrons, Alouatta seniculus and Ateles hybridus, in Magdalena Valley, Colombia. We tested the assumption that generalist species are more resilient than specialist species to habitat degradation by examining the fragments' vegetation and spatial structure and how these affected primate presence and abundance patterns. We found C. albifrons, a generalist, to be the most abundant species in 9 of 10 forest fragments, regardless of the level of habitat disturbance. A. hybridus, a large-bodied primate with a specialist diet, was either absent or low in abundance in fragments that had experienced recent disturbances and was found only in higher-quality fragments, regardless of the fragment size. A. seniculus, a species considered to have a highly flexible diet and the ability to survive in degraded habitat, was found in intermediate abundances between those of Cebus spp. and Ateles spp., and was more frequently found in high-quality fragments.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Alouatta/fisiologia
Atelinae/fisiologia
Cebus/fisiologia
Florestas
Dispersão Vegetal/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adaptação Biológica
Animais
Colômbia
Fatores de Confusão (Epidemiologia)
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Ecossistema
Sistemas de Informação Geográfica
Densidade Demográfica
Imagens de Satélites
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1612
[Cu] Atualização por classe:161230
[Lr] Data última revisão:
161230
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160420
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1159/000443929



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