Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : B01.050.150.900.649.313.988.700 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 620 [refinar]
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  1 / 620 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28666376
[Au] Autor:Kistler L; Johnson SM; Irwin MT; Louis EE; Ratan A; Perry GH
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560, USA.
[Ti] Título:A massively parallel strategy for STR marker development, capture, and genotyping.
[So] Source:Nucleic Acids Res;45(15):e142, 2017 Sep 06.
[Is] ISSN:1362-4962
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Short tandem repeat (STR) variants are highly polymorphic markers that facilitate powerful population genetic analyses. STRs are especially valuable in conservation and ecological genetic research, yielding detailed information on population structure and short-term demographic fluctuations. Massively parallel sequencing has not previously been leveraged for scalable, efficient STR recovery. Here, we present a pipeline for developing STR markers directly from high-throughput shotgun sequencing data without a reference genome, and an approach for highly parallel target STR recovery. We employed our approach to capture a panel of 5000 STRs from a test group of diademed sifakas (Propithecus diadema, n = 3), endangered Malagasy rainforest lemurs, and we report extremely efficient recovery of targeted loci-97.3-99.6% of STRs characterized with ≥10x non-redundant sequence coverage. We then tested our STR capture strategy on P. diadema fecal DNA, and report robust initial results and suggestions for future implementations. In addition to STR targets, this approach also generates large, genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panels from flanking regions. Our method provides a cost-effective and scalable solution for rapid recovery of large STR and SNP datasets in any species without needing a reference genome, and can be used even with suboptimal DNA more easily acquired in conservation and ecological studies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Marcadores Genéticos
Técnicas de Genotipagem/métodos
Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala/métodos
Repetições de Microssatélites
Strepsirhini/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Sequência de Bases
Espécies em Perigo de Extinção
Genética Populacional/métodos
Genoma Humano
Técnicas de Genotipagem/veterinária
Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala/veterinária
Seres Humanos
Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
Análise de Sequência de DNA/métodos
Análise de Sequência de DNA/veterinária
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Genetic Markers)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171107
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171107
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170702
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/nar/gkx574


  2 / 620 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28366198
[Au] Autor:Russo GA; Kirk EC
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. Electronic address: gabrielle.russo@stonybrook.edu.
[Ti] Título:Another look at the foramen magnum in bipedal mammals.
[So] Source:J Hum Evol;105:24-40, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8606
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:A more anteriorly positioned foramen magnum evolved in concert with bipedalism at least four times within Mammalia: once in macropodid marsupials, once in heteromyid rodents, once in dipodid rodents, and once in hominoid primates. Here, we expand upon previous research on the factors influencing mammalian foramen magnum position (FMP) and angle with four new analyses. First, we quantify FMP using a metric (basioccipital ratio) not previously examined in a broad comparative sample of mammals. Second, we evaluate the potential influence of relative brain size on both FMP and foramen magnum angle (FMA). Third, we assess FMP in an additional rodent clade (Anomaluroidea) containing bipedal springhares (Pedetes spp.) and gliding/quadrupedal anomalures (Anomalurus spp.). Fourth, we determine the relationship between measures of FMP and FMA in extant hominoids and an expanded mammalian sample. Our results indicate that bipedal/orthograde mammals have shorter basioccipitals than their quadrupedal/non-orthograde relatives. Brain size alone has no discernible effect on FMP or FMA. Brain size relative to palate size has a weak influence on FMP in some clades, but effects are not evident in all metrics of FMP and are inconsistent among clades. Among anomaluroids, bipedal Pedetes exhibits a more anterior FMP than gliding/quadrupedal Anomalurus. The relationship between FMA and FMP in hominoids depends on the metric chosen for quantifying FMP, and if modern humans are included in the sample. However, the relationship between FMA and FMP is nonexistent or weak across rodents, marsupials, and, to a lesser extent, strepsirrhine primates. These results provide further evidence that bipedal mammals tend to have more anteriorly positioned foramina magna than their quadrupedal close relatives. Our findings also suggest that the evolution of FMP and FMA in hominins may not be closely coupled.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Forame Magno/anatomia & histologia
Locomoção
Marsupiais/anatomia & histologia
Roedores/anatomia & histologia
Strepsirhini/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Marsupiais/fisiologia
Roedores/fisiologia
Strepsirhini/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170921
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170921
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170404
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  3 / 620 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27973681
[Au] Autor:Springer A; Kappeler PM; Nunn CL
[Ad] Endereço:Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Unit, German Primate Center, Göttingen, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Dynamic vs. static social networks in models of parasite transmission: predicting Cryptosporidium spread in wild lemurs.
[So] Source:J Anim Ecol;86(3):419-433, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2656
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Social networks provide an established tool to implement heterogeneous contact structures in epidemiological models. Dynamic temporal changes in contact structure and ranging behaviour of wildlife may impact disease dynamics. A consensus has yet to emerge, however, concerning the conditions in which network dynamics impact model outcomes, as compared to static approximations that average contact rates over longer time periods. Furthermore, as many pathogens can be transmitted both environmentally and via close contact, it is important to investigate the relative influence of both transmission routes in real-world populations. Here, we use empirically derived networks from a population of wild primates, Verreaux's sifakas (Propithecus verreauxi), and simulated networks to investigate pathogen spread in dynamic vs. static social networks. First, we constructed a susceptible-exposed-infected-recovered model of Cryptosporidium spread in wild Verreaux's sifakas. We incorporated social and environmental transmission routes and parameterized the model for two different climatic seasons. Second, we used simulated networks and greater variation in epidemiological parameters to investigate the conditions in which dynamic networks produce larger outbreak sizes than static networks. We found that average outbreak size of Cryptosporidium infections in sifakas was larger when the disease was introduced in the dry season than in the wet season, driven by an increase in home range overlap towards the end of the dry season. Regardless of season, dynamic networks always produced larger average outbreak sizes than static networks. Larger outbreaks in dynamic models based on simulated networks occurred especially when the probability of transmission and recovery were low. Variation in tie strength in the dynamic networks also had a major impact on outbreak size, while network modularity had a weaker influence than epidemiological parameters that determine transmission and recovery. Our study adds to emerging evidence that dynamic networks can change predictions of disease dynamics, especially if the disease shows low transmissibility and a long infectious period, and when environmental conditions lead to enhanced between-group contact after an infectious agent has been introduced.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Criptosporidiose/epidemiologia
Criptosporidiose/transmissão
Cryptosporidium/fisiologia
Surtos de Doenças/veterinária
Comportamento Social
Strepsirhini
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Criptosporidiose/parasitologia
Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital
Madagáscar/epidemiologia
Modelos Biológicos
Estações do Ano
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170928
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170928
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/1365-2656.12617


  4 / 620 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27869570
[Au] Autor:Fernández Lázaro G; Zehr S; Alonso García E
[Ad] Endereço:a Animal Welfare Group, Animal Welfare Science, Humanities, Ethics and Law-Interdisciplinary Animal Studies (AWSHEL-IAS) , Franklin Institute, Research Institute for North American Studies, University of Alcala , Madrid , Spain.
[Ti] Título:Use of Primates in Research: What Do We Know About Captive Strepsirrhine Primates?
[So] Source:J Appl Anim Welf Sci;20(2):109-122, 2017 Apr-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1532-7604
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The increasing debate and restrictions on primate research have prompted many surveys about their status. However, there is a lack of information regarding strepsirrhine primates in the literature. This study provides an overview of research on strepsirrhines in captivity by analyzing scientific articles published from 2010 to 2013 and assessing publicly available government reports in Europe and the United States. Data on taxonomy, country, research area, research class, and type of institution were extracted. The 174 qualifying articles showed that species in the Galagidae and Cheirogaleidae families were used more often in invasive studies of neuroscience and metabolism, while the most commonly used species in noninvasive studies of behavior and cognition were true lemurs (family Lemuridae). France conducted the greatest number of invasive research projects, and the Duke Lemur Center was the institution with the most noninvasive studies. This study investigates how strepsirrhines are used in captive research and identifies issues in need of further review, which suggest that increased participation by the scientific community in the monitoring of strepsirrhine research is warranted.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Animais de Laboratório
Pesquisa
Strepsirhini
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Bem-Estar do Animal
Animais
Ética em Pesquisa
Europa (Continente)
Lemuridae
Primatas
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170817
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170817
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/10888705.2016.1255554


  5 / 620 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27848157
[Au] Autor:Miller RT; Raharison JL; Irwin MT
[Ad] Endereço:Schreyer Honors College, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, PA, 16802, USA. rtm5200@psu.edu.
[Ti] Título:Competition for dead trees between humans and aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis) in central eastern Madagascar.
[So] Source:Primates;58(2):367-375, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1610-7365
[Cp] País de publicação:Japan
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The destruction and degradation of forest habitats are major threats to the sustainability of lemur populations in Madagascar. Madagascan landscapes often contain forest fragments that represent refuges for native fauna, while also being used for firewood and timber by local human populations. As undisturbed forest becomes increasingly scarce, understanding resource competition between humans and wildlife in disturbed habitats will be increasingly important. We tested the hypothesis that Malagasy and aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis) compete for the limited number of dead trees in rainforest fragments at Tsinjoarivo, Madagascar. We surveyed 2.16 ha within five fragments (range 5-228 ha) surrounding human settlements to quantify the density of dead trees and traces of both human and aye-aye activity. Neither aye-aye nor human traces were distributed according to the availability of particular trees species, and aye-ayes and Malagasy apparently preferred several different species. Although overlap was recorded in tree species used, human use tended to be positively correlated with a species' desirability as firewood, while a negative relationship was seen for aye-ayes. Both consumers used trees of similar diameter at breast height, but those used by aye-ayes tended to be older, suggesting that human use might precede usefulness for aye-ayes. Finally, the density of dead trees and aye-aye traces were highest in smaller fragments, but human traces did not vary across fragment size. Although further study is needed to better quantify the aye-aye diet in this region, these data suggest that aye-ayes and local people compete for dead trees, and this competition could constitute a pressure on aye-aye populations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Competitivo
Comportamento Alimentar
Strepsirhini/fisiologia
Árvores
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Ecossistema
Seres Humanos
Madagáscar
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171014
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171014
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161117
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10329-016-0585-4


  6 / 620 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27394434
[Au] Autor:Sawyer RM; Fenosoa ZSE; Andrianarimisa A; Donati G
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, OX3 0BP, UK. rachel.mary.sawyer@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:The effect of habitat disturbance on the abundance of nocturnal lemur species on the Masoala Peninsula, northeastern Madagascar.
[So] Source:Primates;58(1):187-197, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1610-7365
[Cp] País de publicação:Japan
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Madagascar is one of the world's biodiversity hotspots. The island's past and current rates of deforestation and habitat disturbance threaten its plethora of endemic biodiversity. On Madagascar, tavy (slash and burn agriculture), land conversion for rice cultivation, illegal hardwood logging and bushmeat hunting are the major contributors to habitat disturbance. Understanding species-specific responses to habitat disturbance across different habitat types is crucial when designing conservation strategies. We surveyed three nocturnal lemur species in four forest types of varying habitat disturbance on the Masoala Peninsula, northeastern Madagascar. We present here updated abundance and density estimates for the Endangered Avahi mooreorum and Lepilemur scottorum, and Microcebus sp. Distance sampling surveys were conducted on 11 transects, covering a total of 33 km after repeated transect walks. We collected data on tree height, bole height, diameter at breast height, canopy cover and tree density using point-quarter sampling to characterise the four forest types (primary lowland, primary littoral, selectively logged and agricultural mosaic). Median encounter rates by forest type ranged from 1 to 1.5 individuals (ind.)/km (Microcebus sp.), 0-1 ind./km (A. mooreorum) and 0-1 ind./km (L. scottorum). Species density estimates were calculated at 232.31 ind./km (Microcebus sp.) and 121.21 ind./km (A. mooreorum), while no density estimate is provided for L. scottorum due to a small sample size. Microcebus sp. was most tolerant to habitat disturbance, exhibiting no significant effect of forest type on abundance. Its small body size, omnivorous diet and generalised locomotion appear to allow it to tolerate a variety of habitat disturbance. Both A. mooreorum and L. scottorum showed significant effects of forest type on their respective abundance. This study suggests that the specialist locomotion and diet of A. mooreorum and L. scottorum make them susceptible to the effects of increasing habitat disturbance.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Ecossistema
Strepsirhini/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Madagáscar
Densidade Demográfica
Especificidade da Espécie
Árvores/crescimento & desenvolvimento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171014
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171014
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160711
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10329-016-0552-0


  7 / 620 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27870352
[Au] Autor:Harvey BM; Bhatnagar KP; Schenck RJ; Rosenberger AL; Rehorek SJ; Burrows AM; DeLeon VB; Smith TD
[Ad] Endereço:School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania, 16057.
[Ti] Título:Membranous Support for Eyes of Strepsirrhine Primates and Fruit Bats.
[So] Source:Anat Rec (Hoboken);299(12):1690-1703, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1932-8494
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Living primates have relatively large eyes and support orbital tissues with a postorbital bar (POB) and/or septum. Some mammals with large eyes lack a POB, and presumably rely on soft tissues. Here, we examined the orbits of four species of strepsirrhine primates (Galagidae, Cheirogaleidae) and three species of fruit bats (Pteropodidae). Microdissection and light microscopy were employed to identify support structures of the orbit. In bats and primates, there are two layers of fascial sheets that border the eye laterally. The outer membrane is the most superficial layer of deep fascia, and has connections to the POB in primates. In fruit bats, which lacked a POB or analogous ligament, the deep fascia is reinforced by transverse ligaments. Bats and primates have a deeper membrane supporting the eye, identified as the periorbita (PA) based on the presence of elastic fibers and smooth muscle. The PA merges with periostea deep within the orbit, but has no periosteal attachment to the POB of primates. These findings demonstrate that relatively big eyes can be supported primarily with fibrous connective tissues as well as the PA, in absence of a POB or ligament. The well-developed smooth muscle component within the PA of fruit bats likely helps to protrude the eye, maintaining a more convergent eye orientation, with greater overlap of the visual fields. The possibility should be considered that early euprimates, and even stem primates that may have lacked a POB, also had more convergent eyes than indicated by osseous measurements of orbital orientation. Anat Rec, 299:1690-1703, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Quirópteros/anatomia & histologia
Tecido Conjuntivo/anatomia & histologia
Olho/anatomia & histologia
Órbita/anatomia & histologia
Strepsirhini/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Quirópteros/fisiologia
Tecido Conjuntivo/fisiologia
Órbita/fisiologia
Strepsirhini/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170724
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170724
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ar.23468


  8 / 620 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27794576
[Au] Autor:Congdon KA; Ravosa MJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Basic Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, Nev., USA.
[Ti] Título:Get a Grip: Substrate Orientation and Digital Grasping Pressures in Strepsirrhines.
[So] Source:Folia Primatol (Basel);87(4):224-243, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1421-9980
[Cp] País de publicação:Switzerland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Skeletal functional morphology in primates underlies many fossil interpretations. Understanding the functional correlates of arboreal grasping is central to identifying locomotor signatures in extinct primates. We tested 3 predictions linking substrate orientation and digital grasping pressures: (1) below-branch pressures are greater than above-branch and vertical-branch pressures; (2) there is no difference in pressure exerted across digits within autopods at any substrate orientation, and (3) there is no difference in pressure exerted between homologous digits across autopods at any substrate orientation. Adult males and females from 3 strepsirrhine species crossed an artificial arboreal substrate oriented for above-, below- and vertical-branch locomotion. We compared digital pressures within and across behaviors via ANOVA and Tukey's Honest Significant Difference test. Results show limited support for all predictions: below-branch pressures exceeded vertical-branch pressures and above-branch pressures for some digits and species (prediction 1), lateral digits often exerted greater pressures than medial digits (prediction 2), and pedal digits occasionally exerted greater pressures than manual digits during above-branch and vertical orientations but less often for below-branch locomotion (prediction 3). We observed functional variability across autopods, substrate and species that could underlie morphological variation within and across primates. Future work should consider the complexity of arboreality when inferring locomotor modes in fossils.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Força da Mão/fisiologia
Locomoção
Strepsirhini/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Fenômenos Biomecânicos
Feminino
/fisiologia
Mãos/fisiologia
Masculino
Postura
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1701
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170126
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170126
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161031
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 620 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27748958
[Au] Autor:Voje KL
[Ad] Endereço:Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
[Ti] Título:Tempo does not correlate with mode in the fossil record.
[So] Source:Evolution;70(12):2678-2689, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1558-5646
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The dominating view of evolution based on the fossil record is that established species remain more or less unaltered during their existence. Substantial evolution is on the other hand routinely reported for contemporary populations, and most quantitative traits show high potential for evolution. These contrasting observations on long- and short-time scales are often referred to as the paradox of stasis, which rests on the fundamental assumption that periods of morphological stasis in the fossil record represent minimal evolutionary change. Investigating 450 fossil time series, I demonstrate that the nonaccumulating morphological fluctuations during stasis travel similar distances in morphospace compared to lineages showing directional change. Hence, lineages showing stasis are commonly undergoing considerable amounts of evolution, but this evolution does not accumulate to produce large net evolutionary changes over time. Rates of evolutionary change across modes in the fossil record may be more homogenous than previously assumed and advocated, supporting the claim that substantial evolution is not exclusively or causally linked to the process of speciation. Instead of exemplifying minimal evolution, stasis likely represents information on the dynamics of the adaptive landscape on macroevolutionary time scales, including the persistence of adaptive zones and ecological niches over millions of years.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Fósseis/anatomia & histologia
Fenótipo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Invertebrados/anatomia & histologia
Rhizaria/ultraestrutura
Strepsirhini/anatomia & histologia
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170920
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170920
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161018
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/evo.13090


  10 / 620 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27650579
[Au] Autor:Dunn RH; Rose KD; Rana RS; Kumar K; Sahni A; Smith T
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anatomy, Des Moines University, Des Moines, IA 50312, USA. Electronic address: rdunn@dmu.edu.
[Ti] Título:New euprimate postcrania from the early Eocene of Gujarat, India, and the strepsirrhine-haplorhine divergence.
[So] Source:J Hum Evol;99:25-51, 2016 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8606
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The oldest primates of modern aspect (euprimates) appear abruptly on the Holarctic continents during a brief episode of global warming known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, at the beginning of the Eocene (∼56 Ma). When they first appear in the fossil record, they are already divided into two distinct clades, Adapoidea (basal members of Strepsirrhini, which includes extant lemurs, lorises, and bushbabies) and Omomyidae (basal Haplorhini, which comprises living tarsiers, monkeys, and apes). Both groups have recently been discovered in the early Eocene Cambay Shale Formation of Vastan lignite mine, Gujarat, India, where they are known mainly from teeth and jaws. The Vastan fossils are dated at ∼54.5 Myr based on associated dinoflagellates and isotope stratigraphy. Here, we describe new, exquisitely preserved limb bones of these Indian primates that reveal more primitive postcranial characteristics than have been previously documented for either clade, and differences between them are so minor that in many cases we cannot be certain to which group they belong. Nevertheless, the small distinctions observed in some elements foreshadow postcranial traits that distinguish the groups by the middle Eocene, suggesting that the Vastan primates-though slightly younger than the oldest known euprimates-may represent the most primitive known remnants of the divergence between the two great primate clades.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fósseis
Haplorrinos/anatomia & histologia
Strepsirhini/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Osso e Ossos/anatomia & histologia
Extremidades/anatomia & histologia
Especiação Genética
Haplorrinos/classificação
Índia
Strepsirhini/classificação
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170803
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170803
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160922
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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