Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : B01.050.150.900.649.313.988.700.508 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 273 [refinar]
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  1 / 273 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28437185
[Au] Autor:Métras R; Dommergues L; Ortiz K; Pannequin M; Schuler C; Roux P; Edmunds JW; Keeling MJ; Cêtre-Sossah C; Cardinale E
[Ad] Endereço:1 Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine , London, United Kingdom .
[Ti] Título:Absence of Evidence of Rift Valley Fever Infection in Eulemur fulvus (Brown Lemur) in Mayotte During an Interepidemic Period.
[So] Source:Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis;17(5):358-360, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1557-7759
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The potential role of Eulemur fulvus (brown lemur) in the epidemiology of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in Mayotte, during an interepidemic period, was explored. In February and March 2016, 72 animals were blood sampled and tested for RVF. No evidence of RVF genome or antibodies was found in the samples. The role of other wild mammals on the island should, however, be further investigated.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Lemuridae/sangue
Febre do Vale de Rift/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Anticorpos Antivirais/sangue
Comores/epidemiologia
Febre do Vale de Rift/sangue
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antibodies, Viral)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170915
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170915
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170425
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1089/vbz.2016.2079


  2 / 273 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28295350
[Au] Autor:Raharison F; Bourges Abella N; Sautet J; Deviers A; Mogicato G
[Ad] Endereço:Département d'Enseignement de Sciences et de Médecine Vétérinaire, Faculté de Médecine, Université d'Antananarivo, Antananarivo, Madagascar.
[Ti] Título:Anatomy, histology, and ultrasonography of the normal adrenal gland in brown lemur: Eulemur fulvus.
[So] Source:J Med Primatol;46(2):25-30, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0684
[Cp] País de publicação:Denmark
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The medical care currently to brown lemurs (Eulemur fulvus) is limited by a lack of knowledge of their anatomy. The aim of this study was to describe the anatomy and histology and obtain ultrasonographic measurements of normal adrenal glands in these animals. METHODS: The adrenal glands of four lemurs cadavers were used for the anatomical and histological studies, and those of 15 anesthetized lemurs were examined by ultrasonography. RESULTS: Anatomically, the adrenal glands of brown lemurs are comparable to those of other species. The histological findings showed that the cortex is organized into three distinct layers, whereas most domestic mammals have an additional zone. The surface area of the adrenal glands increased with body weight, and the area of the right adrenal was slightly larger than the left. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest using ultrasonography to aid the etiological diagnosis of behavioral abnormalities that might be due to dysfunctions of the adrenal gland.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Glândulas Suprarrenais/anatomia & histologia
Glândulas Suprarrenais/diagnóstico por imagem
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Lemur/anatomia & histologia
Lemuridae/anatomia & histologia
Masculino
Ultrassonografia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170918
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170918
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170316
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/jmp.12255


  3 / 273 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28085890
[Au] Autor:Federman S; Sinnott-Armstrong M; Baden AL; Chapman CA; Daly DC; Richard AR; Valenta K; Donoghue MJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:The Paucity of Frugivores in Madagascar May Not Be Due to Unpredictable Temperatures or Fruit Resources.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(1):e0168943, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The evolution of ecological idiosyncrasies in Madagascar has often been attributed to selective pressures stemming from extreme unpredictability in climate and resource availability compared to other tropical areas. With the exception of rainfall, few studies have investigated these assumptions. To assess the hypothesis that Madagascar's paucity of frugivores is due to unreliability in fruiting resources, we use statistical modeling to analyze phenology datasets and their environmental correlates from two tropical wet forests, the Réserve Naturelle Intégrale Betampona in Madagascar, and Kibale National Park in Uganda. At each site we found that temperature is a good environmental predictor of fruit availability. We found no evidence of a significant difference in the predictability of fruit availability between the two sites, although the shorter duration of phenological monitoring at Betampona (two years, versus 15 years at Kibale) limits our ability to infer long-term patterns. Comparisons of long-term temperature data from each site (15 years from Kibale and 14 from Betampona) indicate that temperature is more predictable at Betampona than at Kibale. However, there does appear to be a difference between the two sites in the total fruit availability at any given time, with fruit being generally less abundant at Betampona. Our results appear contrary to the prevailing hypothesis of a selective force imposed by unpredictable resource availability or temperature, and we suggest other possible explanations for Madagascar's unique biota.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Biodiversidade
Clima
Ecossistema
Comportamento Alimentar
Frutas
Lemuridae/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Herbivoria
Temperatura Ambiente
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170808
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170808
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170114
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0168943


  4 / 273 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27869570
[Au] Autor:Fernández Lázaro G; Zehr S; Alonso García E
[Ad] Endereço:a Animal Welfare Group, Animal Welfare Science, Humanities, Ethics and Law-Interdisciplinary Animal Studies (AWSHEL-IAS) , Franklin Institute, Research Institute for North American Studies, University of Alcala , Madrid , Spain.
[Ti] Título:Use of Primates in Research: What Do We Know About Captive Strepsirrhine Primates?
[So] Source:J Appl Anim Welf Sci;20(2):109-122, 2017 Apr-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1532-7604
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The increasing debate and restrictions on primate research have prompted many surveys about their status. However, there is a lack of information regarding strepsirrhine primates in the literature. This study provides an overview of research on strepsirrhines in captivity by analyzing scientific articles published from 2010 to 2013 and assessing publicly available government reports in Europe and the United States. Data on taxonomy, country, research area, research class, and type of institution were extracted. The 174 qualifying articles showed that species in the Galagidae and Cheirogaleidae families were used more often in invasive studies of neuroscience and metabolism, while the most commonly used species in noninvasive studies of behavior and cognition were true lemurs (family Lemuridae). France conducted the greatest number of invasive research projects, and the Duke Lemur Center was the institution with the most noninvasive studies. This study investigates how strepsirrhines are used in captive research and identifies issues in need of further review, which suggest that increased participation by the scientific community in the monitoring of strepsirrhine research is warranted.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Animais de Laboratório
Pesquisa
Strepsirhini
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Bem-Estar do Animal
Animais
Ética em Pesquisa
Europa (Continente)
Lemuridae
Primatas
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170817
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170817
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/10888705.2016.1255554


  5 / 273 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27691971
[Au] Autor:Rosser MF; Lindemann DM; Barger AM; Allender MC; Hsiao SH; Howes ME
[Ti] Título:SYSTEMIC BLASTOMYCOSIS IN A CAPTIVE RED RUFFED LEMUR (VARECIA RUBRA).
[So] Source:J Zoo Wildl Med;47(3):912-916, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1042-7260
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:A 5-yr-old, intact male red ruffed lemur ( Varecia rubra ) presented for evaluation as the result of a 1-wk history of lethargy and hyporexia. Physical examination findings included thin body condition, muffled heart sounds, harsh lung sounds, and liquid brown diarrhea. Complete blood count and serum biochemistry showed an inflammatory leukogram, mild hyponatremia, and mild hypochloremia. Orthogonal trunk radiographs revealed a severe alveolar pattern in the right cranial lung lobes with cardiac silhouette effacement. Thoracic ultrasound confirmed a large, hypoechoic mass in the right lung lobes. Fine-needle aspiration of the lung mass and cytology revealed fungal yeast organisms, consistent with Blastomyces dermatitidis. Blastomyces Quantitative EIA Test on urine was positive. Postmortem examination confirmed systemic blastomycosis involving the lung, tracheobronchial lymph nodes, spleen, kidney, liver, cerebrum, and eye. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of blastomycosis in a prosimian species.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Blastomicose/veterinária
Lemuridae
Pneumopatias/veterinária
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Animais de Zoológico
Diarreia/microbiologia
Diarreia/veterinária
Pneumopatias/microbiologia
Pneumopatias/patologia
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1701
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170107
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170107
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161004
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  6 / 273 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27010276
[Au] Autor:Donadeo BC; Kerr KR; Morris CL; Swanson KS
[Ti] Título:ESTIMATED COMPOSITION OF DIETS FED TO CAPTIVE BLACK-AND-WHITE RUFFED LEMURS (VARECIA VARIEGATA) AT 33 U.S. ZOOLOGICAL INSTITUTIONS.
[So] Source:J Zoo Wildl Med;47(1):150-60, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1042-7260
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Data on captive diets for black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata) are limited. Information on food items used, inclusion amounts, and the chemical composition of diets is needed to improve the management of nutrition-related health problems seen in captive lemurs (e.g., obesity) that have not been reported in their wild counterparts. To determine the ingredient and nutrient composition of diets for captive V. variegata, U.S. zoological institutions were surveyed. Chemical composition of reported diets was estimated using Nutritionist Pro™ (Axxya Systems, Stafford, Texas 77477, USA), and these values were compared numerically to wild lemur diets from the literature. Institutions included from six to greater than 30 different ingredients in their diets, including fruits (0.0-84.1%), vegetables (7.5-70.0%), greens (1.0-28.5%), and commercially available feeds (1.5-68.6%). Nutrient concentrations of captive diets ranged as follows: dry matter (DM), 14.5-67.6%; organic matter, 93.1-97.2% DM basis (DMB); crude protein, 7.9-23.9% DMB; fat, 2.0-6.5% DMB; total dietary fiber, 10.1-28.1% DMB; and N-free extract, 38.9-74.4% DMB. Captive diets had lower fat and total dietary fiber and higher protein and N-free extract compared to wild fruit items from Madagascar. Reducing the amount of fruit in captive diets for V. variegata would be expected to decrease digestible carbohydrate content and increase fiber content of these diets, which has implications for the prevalence of obesity in captive animals.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ração Animal/análise
Animais de Zoológico
Dieta/veterinária
Lemuridae
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Criação de Animais Domésticos
Animais
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1605
[Cu] Atualização por classe:160325
[Lr] Data última revisão:
160325
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160325
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1638/2015-0080.1


  7 / 273 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27010275
[Au] Autor:Alexander AB; Poirotte C; Porton IJ; Freeman KL; Rasambainarivo F; Olson KG; Iambana B; Deem SL
[Ti] Título:GASTROINTESTINAL PARASITES OF CAPTIVE AND FREE-LIVING LEMURS AND DOMESTIC CARNIVORES IN EASTERN MADAGASCAR.
[So] Source:J Zoo Wildl Med;47(1):141-9, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1042-7260
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Fecal samples from captive and free-living lemurs at Ivoloina Zoological Park (IZP) and domestic carnivores from six villages surrounding IZP were evaluated between July and August 2012. Free-living lemurs from Betampona Natural Reserve (BNR), a relatively pristine rainforest fragment 40 km away, were also evaluated in November 2013. All 33 dogs sampled (100%) and 16 of 22 cats sampled (72.7%) were parasitized, predominantly with nematodes (strongyles, ascarids, and spirurids) as well as cestodes and protozoans. Similar types of parasites were identified in the lemur populations. Identification of spirurid nematodes and protozoans in the lemur fecal samples were of concern due to previously documented morbidity and mortality in lemurs from these parasitic agents. Twelve of 13 free-living (93%) and 31 of 49 captive (63%) lemurs sampled at IZP had a higher parasite prevalence than lemurs at BNR, with 13 of 24 (54%) being parasitized. The lemurs in BNR are likely at risk of increased exposure to these parasites and, therefore, increased morbidity and mortality, as humans and their domestic animals are encroaching on this natural area.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doenças do Gato/parasitologia
Doenças do Cão/parasitologia
Lemuridae
Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/parasitologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia
Gatos
Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia
Cães
Fezes/parasitologia
Madagáscar/epidemiologia
Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/epidemiologia
Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/transmissão
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1605
[Cu] Atualização por classe:160325
[Lr] Data última revisão:
160325
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160325
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1638/2015-0111.1


  8 / 273 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26860934
[Au] Autor:Eppley TM; Donati G; Ganzhorn JU
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin, 2201 Speedway Stop C3200, Austin, TX, 78712, USA. eppleyti@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Unusual sleeping site selection by southern bamboo lemurs.
[So] Source:Primates;57(2):167-73, 2016 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1610-7365
[Cp] País de publicação:Japan
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Selection of sleeping sites has consequences for individual fitness. Non-human primates often bias their selection towards arboreal sites, and the lemurs of Madagascar typically rest/sleep in trees, tree holes, and/or constructed nests. Three non-mutually exclusive hypotheses to explain sleeping site selection include protection from predators, avoidance of parasitic vectors, and improved thermoregulation. Here, we examine these hypotheses for the unusual sleeping site selections by the southern bamboo lemur (Hapalemur meridionalis). Within the Mandena littoral forest of southeast Madagascar, the southern bamboo lemur is known for its ecological flexibility compared to other bamboo lemur species, including a dietary niche expansion to feeding on the ground. Between October 2012 and December 2013, we observed bamboo lemurs from three social groups for 1778.67 h, conducting full-day focal follows on 11 adult individuals (five males, six females). During this period, all three groups were observed to sleep on the ground, with one of these groups also using an abandoned nest of a Madagascar crested ibis (Lophotibis cristata). We collected habitat and temperature data to examine whether selection was influenced by environmental variables. Terrestrial sleeping (N = 17) was observed in all individuals but one adult female, with individuals burrowing under thick vegetation more often during the hot austral summer. While difficult to rigorously test, it is possible that terrestrial sleep sites and/or sleeping in a bird nest may impair visual detection by some aerial and terrestrial predators. Neither of these sites (i.e., terrestrial sleeping or use of a bird nest), however, is likely to minimize exposure to parasites/vectors. Terrestrial sleeping appears to support a thermoregulatory strategy, whereas the use of a bird nest could not be empirically tested. Our observations of unique sleeping site locations used by southern bamboo lemurs further the complexity of their natural history and that of Malagasy strepsirrhines.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal
Lemuridae/fisiologia
Sono
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Regulação da Temperatura Corporal
Feminino
Cadeia Alimentar
Madagáscar
Masculino
Estações do Ano
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1612
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171014
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171014
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160211
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10329-016-0516-4


  9 / 273 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26606154
[Au] Autor:Baden AL; Webster TH; Kamilar JM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology, Hunter College, New York, New York.
[Ti] Título:Resource seasonality and reproduction predict fission-fusion dynamics in black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata).
[So] Source:Am J Primatol;78(2):256-79, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2345
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Ruffed lemurs (genus Varecia) are often described as having a flexible social organization, such that both cohesive (low fission-fusion dynamics) and fluid (high fission-fusion dynamics) grouping patterns have been observed. In ruffed lemur communities with high fission-fusion dynamics, group members vary in their temporal and spatial dispersion throughout a communally defended territory. These patterns have been likened to those observed in several haplorrhine species that exhibit the most fluid types of fission-fusion social organization (e.g., Pan and Ateles). To substantiate and further refine these claims, we describe the fission-fusion dynamics of a black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata) community at Mangevo, an undisturbed primary rainforest site in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar. We collected instantaneous group scan samples from August 2007-December 2008 (4,044 observation hours) to study and characterize patterns of subgroup size, composition, cohesion, and social association. In 16 consecutive months, we never found all members of the community together. In fact, individuals spent nearly half of their time alone. Subgroups were small, cohesive, and typically of mixed-sex composition. Mixed-sex subgroups were significantly larger, less cohesive, and more common than either male-only or female-only subgroups. Subgroup dynamics were related to shifts in climate, phenology of preferred fruit species, and female reproductive state. On average, association indices were low. Males and females were equally gregarious; however, adult male-male associations were significantly weaker than any other association type. Results presented herein document striking differences in fission-fusion dynamics between black-and-white ruffed lemurs and haplorrhines, while also demonstrating many broad-scale similarities to haplorrhine taxa that possess the most fluid fission-fusion societies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Meio Ambiente
Lemuridae/fisiologia
Reprodução
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Madagáscar
Masculino
Estações do Ano
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Mês de entrada:1610
[Cu] Atualização por classe:161230
[Lr] Data última revisão:
161230
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:151126
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajp.22507


  10 / 273 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:25864507
[Au] Autor:Tecot SR; Singletary B; Eadie E
[Ad] Endereço:School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona.
[Ti] Título:Why "monogamy" isn't good enough.
[So] Source:Am J Primatol;78(3):340-54, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2345
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Rare in mammals but more common in primates, there remains a considerable controversy concerning whether primate species traditionally described as monogamous actually express this highly specialized breeding pattern. Unfortunately the definition of "monogamy" varies greatly, inhibiting our understanding of this trait and two related traits with which monogamy is often conflated: pair-living and pair-bonding. Strepsirrhine primates are useful models to study factors that select for pair-living, pair-bonding, and monogamy because this taxon exhibits high incidences of each trait, in addition to species that exhibit behaviors that reflect combinations of these traits. Several hypotheses have been articulated to help explain the evolution of "monogamy," but again, these hypotheses often conflate pair-living, pair-bonding, and/or monogamy. In this review, we (1) propose clear, discrete, and logical definitions for each trait; (2) review variation in strepsirrhines with respect to these three traits; (3) clarify which of these traits can be explained by existing hypotheses; and (4) provide an example of the applicability of the Resource Defense Hypothesis (RDH) to understand two of these traits, pair-living and pair-bonding, in the red-bellied lemur (Eulemur rubriventer). Available data support the RDH for pair-living in red-bellied lemurs. They live in stable family groups with one adult pair. Both sexes actively codefend territories that overlap little with other pairs' territories. Agonism is extremely rare within groups and intergroup and interspecific agonism varies with food availability. Available data also support the RDH for pair-bonding. Pair-bonds are cohesive year-round. Pairs coordinate behaviors to defend territories with auditory and olfactory signals. Cohesion increases with food abundance and both sexes reinforce bonds. We indicate where additional data will help to more rigorously test the RDH for each trait and encourage others to test alternative hypotheses.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Ligação do Par
Strepsirhini/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Lemuridae/fisiologia
Masculino
Terminologia como Assunto
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1610
[Cu] Atualização por classe:161230
[Lr] Data última revisão:
161230
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:150414
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajp.22412



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