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  1 / 2943 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29215227
[Au] Autor:Kotti BK
[Ti] Título:[FLEAS (SIPHONAPTERA) OF MAMMALS AND BIRDS IN THE CISCAUCASIA].
[So] Source:Parazitologiia;50(6):460-70, 2016 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0031-1847
[Cp] País de publicação:Russia (Federation)
[La] Idioma:rus
[Ab] Resumo:Flea fauna of Ciscaucasia is represented by 76 species, 13 of which are associated with birds and all the other with mammals. Rodent parasites are most numerous; fleas associated with predators, bats and insectivora are less abundant. Fleas parasitize on different species of birds of the orders Passeriformes, Anseriformes, Falconiformes, and Strigiformes. Among 41 flea genera known from the Caucasus, species of the genera Amalaraeus, Araeopsylla, Atyphloceras, Caenopsylla, Callopsvlla, Doratopsvlla, Paraneopsvlla, Peromyscopsylla, Phaenopsylla, Tarsopsylla, and Wagnerina are absent in the Ciscaucasia. Only two subendemic species were revealed in this area. Thirty three flea species are distributed over the entire territory; the distribution of other species is limited to landscapes of one or two natural areas.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aves/parasitologia
Mamíferos/parasitologia
Sifonápteros/classificação
Sifonápteros/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Europa (Continente)
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171221
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171221
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171208
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 2943 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28792853
[Au] Autor:Kosoy M; Reynolds P; Bai Y; Sheff K; Enscore RE; Montenieri J; Ettestad P; Gage K
[Ad] Endereço:1 Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , Fort Collins, Colorado.
[Ti] Título:Small-Scale Die-Offs in Woodrats Support Long-Term Maintenance of Plague in the U.S. Southwest.
[So] Source:Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis;17(9):635-644, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1557-7759
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Our longitudinal study of plague dynamics was conducted in north-central New Mexico to identify which species in the community were infected with plague, to determine the spatial and temporal patterns of the dynamics of plague epizootics, and to describe the dynamics of Yersinia pestis infection within individual hosts. A total of 3156 fleas collected from 535 small mammals of 8 species were tested for Y. pestis DNA. Nine fleas collected from six southern plains woodrats (Neotoma micropus) and from one rock squirrel (Otospermophilus variegatus) were positive for the pla gene of Y. pestis. None of 127 fleas collected from 17 woodrat nests was positive. Hemagglutinating antibodies to the Y. pestis-specific F1 antigen were detected in 11 rodents of 6 species. All parts of the investigated area were subjected to local disappearance of woodrats. Despite the active die-offs, some woodrats always were present within the relatively limited endemic territory and apparently were never exposed to plague. Our observations suggest that small-scale die-offs in woodrats can support maintenance of plague in the active U.S. Southwestern focus.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Peste/veterinária
Sigmodontinae
Sifonápteros/microbiologia
Yersinia pestis/isolamento & purificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Doenças Endêmicas
Peste/epidemiologia
Peste/microbiologia
Dinâmica Populacional
Sciuridae
Sudoeste dos Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
Zoonoses
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170926
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170926
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170810
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1089/vbz.2017.2142


  3 / 2943 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28722614
[Au] Autor:Nyirenda SS; Hang'ombe BM; Machang'u R; Mwanza J; Kilonzo BS
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Microbiology, Parasitology and Immunology, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania.
[Ti] Título:Identification of Risk Factors Associated with Transmission of Plague Disease in Eastern Zambia.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;97(3):826-830, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Plague is a fatal, primarily rodent-flea-borne zoonotic disease caused by . The identification of risk factors of plague was investigated through questionnaire interview and conducting focus group discussion (FGD) in Sinda and Nyimba districts of eastern Zambia. A total of 104 questionnaires were administered to individual respondents and 20 groups consisting of 181 discussants, which comprised FGD team in this study. The study revealed that trapping, transportation, and preparation of rodents for food exposed the community to rodent and their fleas suggesting that plague may have occurred primarily by either flea bites or contact with infected wild rodents. The study also revealed that most people in communities consumed rodents as part of their regular diet; therefore, contact with small wild mammals was a common practice. The mode of transportation of freshly trapped rodents, in particular, carcasses risked human to flea bites. Questionnaire respondents (75%) and FGD discussants (55%) indicated that trappers preferred to carry rodent carcasses in small bags, whereas 55.8% and 20% respectively, reported hunters carrying carcasses in their pockets. Carrying of carcass skewers on trappers' shoulders was reported by 38.4% and 20% of individual respondents and FGD, respectively. All these activities were exposing humans to rodents and their fleas, the natural reservoirs and vectors of plague, respectively. This study also showed that there is a statistically significant (χ = 4.6878, < 0.05), between digging of rodents from their burrows and the presence of fleas on the hunter's bodies or clothes, which exposes humans to potentially flea bites in an enzootic cycle.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Peste/epidemiologia
Peste/transmissão
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Infestações por Pulgas
Microbiologia de Alimentos
Seres Humanos
Fatores de Risco
Roedores
Sifonápteros/microbiologia
Yersinia pestis
Zâmbia/epidemiologia
Zoonoses
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171018
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171018
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170720
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.16-0990


  4 / 2943 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28610351
[Au] Autor:Bienkowski AO; Orlova-Bienkowskaja MJ
[Ad] Endereço:A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Sciences, 33 Leninskiy Prospect, Moscow 119071, Russia.. bienkowski@yandex.ru.
[Ti] Título:World checklist of flea-beetles of the genus Epitrix (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini).
[So] Source:Zootaxa;4268(4):523-540, 2017 05 18.
[Is] ISSN:1175-5334
[Cp] País de publicação:New Zealand
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The world checklist of the genus Epitrix (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) is necessary, since many species of this genus are serious pests of potato and other Solanaceae, and since some species have been inadvertedly introduced from one continent to another and established. We have compiled the catalogue of all species described to date. There are 162 species and 11 subspecies in the world. The geographic distribution is indicated for each species.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Coleópteros
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Sifonápteros
Solanum tuberosum
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170615
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.11646/zootaxa.4268.4.4


  5 / 2943 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28520514
[Au] Autor:Maestas LP; Britten HB
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biology, University of South Dakota , Vermillion, South Dakota.
[Ti] Título:Flea and Small Mammal Species Composition in Mixed-Grass Prairies: Implications for the Maintenance of Yersinia pestis.
[So] Source:Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis;17(7):467-474, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1557-7759
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Maintenance of sylvatic plague in prairie dogs (Cynomis spp.) was once thought unlikely due to high mortality rates; yet more recent findings indicate that low-level enzootic plague may be maintained in susceptible prairie dog populations. Another hypothesis for the maintenance of sylvatic plague involves small mammals, other than prairie dogs, as an alternative reservoir in the sylvatic plague system. These hypotheses, however, are not mutually exclusive, as both prairie dogs and small mammals could together be driving sylvatic cycles of plague. The concept of a bridging vector has been used to explain the transmission of pathogens from one host species to another. In the case of sylvatic plague, this would require overlap in fleas between small mammals and prairie dogs, and potentially other species such as carnivores. Our goal was to evaluate the level of flea sharing between black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomis ludovicianus) and other small mammals in a mixed-grass prairie in South Dakota. We investigated the species richness of small mammals and small-mammal fleas in a mixed-grass prairie system and compared findings with previous studies from a short-grass ecosystem in Colorado. Over the summer field seasons 2014-2016 we live-trapped small mammals, collected fleas, and showed differences between both the flea and small mammal composition of the two systems. We also recorded higher densities of deer mice and lower densities of northern grasshopper mice in mixed versus shortgrass prairies. We confirmed, as is the case in shortgrass prairies, a lack of substantial flea species overlap on small mammal hosts and fleas from prairie dogs and their burrows. Moreover this study demonstrates that although small mammals may not play a large part in interepizootic plague cycling in shortgrass prairie ecosystems, their role in mixed-grass prairies requires further evaluation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infestações por Pulgas/veterinária
Pradaria
Mamíferos/parasitologia
Peste/veterinária
Sifonápteros/microbiologia
Yersinia pestis/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Colorado/epidemiologia
Peste/epidemiologia
Peste/transmissão
South Dakota/epidemiologia
Fatores de Tempo
Zoonoses
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170921
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170921
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170519
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1089/vbz.2016.2069


  6 / 2943 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28486652
[Au] Autor:Eads DA
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
[Ti] Título:Swabbing Prairie Dog Burrows for Fleas That Transmit Yersinia pestis: Influences on Efficiency.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;54(5):1273-1277, 2017 Sep 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Scientists and health-care professionals sometimes use a swabbing technique to collect fleas from rodent burrows, and later test the fleas for Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. Detection of Y. pestis is enhanced when large pools of fleas are available. The following study investigated factors that might affect the rate at which fleas are collected from burrows in colonies of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). Data were collected from 13 colonies in New Mexico during 0600-1000 hours, June-August 2010-2011. Fleas were scarce on swabs inserted into burrows that were not actively used by prairie dogs; fleas are presumably suppressed in burrows that are void of hosts and might have begun to collapse due to a lack of maintenance. Fleas were scarce on swabs inserted into burrows with little sunlight entering the tunnel; many species of fleas use changes in light intensity to locate objects, but if light is limited, it might be difficult to locate a swab. Fleas were scarce on swabs inserted to shallow depths underground, especially during hot mornings, and during the hottest portions of mornings; when conditions are hot above ground, ectothermic fleas might migrate into the deep components of burrows, or become less willing to jump onto hosts, making it difficult to collect the fleas with swabs. If the swabbing technique is used to survey for Y. pestis on colonies of black-tailed prairie dogs, investigators might use the results of this study to modify their methods and increase the number of fleas collected.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infestações por Pulgas/veterinária
Parasitologia/métodos
Peste/veterinária
Doenças dos Roedores/transmissão
Sciuridae
Sifonápteros/microbiologia
Yersinia pestis/isolamento & purificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Meio Ambiente
Infestações por Pulgas/parasitologia
Infestações por Pulgas/transmissão
New Mexico
Peste/microbiologia
Peste/transmissão
Doenças dos Roedores/microbiologia
Doenças dos Roedores/parasitologia
Temperatura Ambiente
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170922
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170922
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170510
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjx090


  7 / 2943 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28419257
[Au] Autor:Foley P; Roth T; Foley J; Ray C
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biological Sciences, Sacramento State University, Sacramento, CA 95819.
[Ti] Título:Rodent-Pika Parasite Spillover in Western North America.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;54(5):1251-1257, 2017 Sep 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Competition during the Cenozoic expansion of the Rodentia may have contributed to ecological niche reduction of pikas, which are now increasingly under threat as their habitat degrades under global climate change, while some rodents expand their ranges and overlap with pikas. Range overlap carries the possibility of disease spillover. Contemporary North American pikas are cold-adapted and relegated primarily to alpine environments where they subsist on relatively low-quality herbaceous diet. Yet their evolutionary ancestors were distributed geographically even into the subtropics. Here we examine historical and contemporary records of fleas on pikas (Ochotona princeps) from sites at different elevations in the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Northwest. We calculated indices of diversity from each site and spillover fraction, i.e., the proportion of fleas on pikas that have a preference for rodents. Across this range there are four pika specialist flea species, with no more than two of these per site, and 18 characteristically rodent flea species. Diversity is greatest in the Pacific Northwest and lowest in Montana. Rodent flea spillover onto pikas declines with elevation in the Rocky Mountains. These data provide evidence that rodents and pikas interact enough to allow considerable parasite spillover, and which could be exacerbated as pikas are increasingly stressed by climate change at lower elevations some rodent species expand up-elevation in the face of increasing global warming. With global climate change, both biotic and abiotic niche shrinkage demand our attention.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Especificidade de Hospedeiro
Lagomorpha/parasitologia
Roedores/parasitologia
Sifonápteros
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Colorado
Montana
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170928
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170928
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170419
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjx085


  8 / 2943 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28400593
[Au] Autor:Kho KL; Koh FX; Hasan LI; Wong LP; Kisomi MG; Bulgiba A; Nizam QN; Tay ST
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[Ti] Título:Rickettsial seropositivity in the indigenous community and animal farm workers, and vector surveillance in Peninsular Malaysia.
[So] Source:Emerg Microbes Infect;6(4):e18, 2017 Apr 12.
[Is] ISSN:2222-1751
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Rickettsioses are emerging zoonotic diseases that are often neglected in many countries in Southeast Asia. Rickettsial agents are transmitted to humans through exposure to infected arthropods. Limited data are available on the exposure of indigenous community and animal farm workers to the aetiological agents and arthropod vectors of rickettsioses in Peninsular Malaysia. Serological analysis of Rickettsia conorii and Rickettsia felis was performed for 102 individuals from the indigenous community at six rural villages and 87 workers from eight animal farms in Peninsular Malaysia in a cross-sectional study. The indigenous community had significantly higher seropositivity rates for R. conorii (P<0.001) and R. felis (P<0.001), as compared to blood donors from urban (n=61). Similarly, higher seropositivity rates for R. conorii (P=0.046) and R. felis (P<0.001) were noted for animal farm workers, as compared to urban blood donors. On the basis of the sequence analysis of gltA, ompA and ompB, various spotted fever group rickettsiae closely related to R. raoultii, R. heilongjiangensis, R. felis-like organisms, R. tamurae, Rickettsia sp. TCM1, R. felis, Rickettsia sp. LON13 and R. hulinensis were identified from tick/flea samples in animal farms, indigenous villages and urban areas. This study describes rickettsial seropositivity of the Malaysian indigenous community and animal farm workers, and provides molecular evidence regarding the presence of rickettsial agents in ticks/fleas infesting domestic animals in Peninsular Malaysia.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Anticorpos Antibacterianos/sangue
Vetores Artrópodes/microbiologia
Fazendeiros
Grupos Populacionais
Rickettsia conorii/imunologia
Rickettsia felis/imunologia
Infecções por Rickettsiaceae/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Animais
Criança
Estudos Transversais
Monitoramento Epidemiológico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Malásia/epidemiologia
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Estudos Soroepidemiológicos
Sifonápteros
Carrapatos
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antibodies, Bacterial)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170608
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170608
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170413
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/emi.2017.4


  9 / 2943 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28399300
[Au] Autor:Foley P; Foley J; Sándor AD; Ionica AM; Matei IA; D'Amico G; Gherman CM; Dom A C; Mihalca AD
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biological Sciences, Sacramento State University, Sacramento, CA 95819.
[Ti] Título:Diversity of Flea (Siphonaptera) Parasites on Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Romania.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;54(5):1243-1250, 2017 Sep 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes (L.)) are widespread across Europe, tolerant of synanthropic ecosystems, and susceptible to diseases potentially shared with humans and other animals. We describe flea fauna on red foxes in Romania, a large, ecologically diverse country, in part because fleas may serve as an indicator of the risk of spillover of vector-borne disease. We found 912 individual fleas of seven species on the 305 foxes assessed, for an infestation prevalence of 49.5%. Mean flea load per fox was 5.8 (range 0-44 fleas), and flea detections were most abundant in fall and early spring. Fleas included generalists (Ctenocephalides canis (Curtis), 32.6% of all fleas), Ct. felis (Bouché, 0.1%), and Pulex irritans L. (29.9%), the fox specialist Chaetopsylla globiceps (Taschenberg, 32.5%), mesocarnivore fleas Paraceras melis Walker (3.2%) and Ch. trichosa Kohaut (1.5%), and the small mammal flea Ctenophthalmus assimilis (Taschenberg, 0.1%), which is rarely or never reported from carnivores. There were significantly more female than male Ch. globiceps, Ct. canis, and Pu. irritans, and these three species were the most broadly distributed geographically. Diversity indices suggested reduced diversity in mountainous areas above 700 m. When compared to other flea studies on foxes in Europe, Romania had flea diversity near the median of reports, which was unexpected given Romania's high ecological diversity. Notably absent prey specialists, compared to other studies, include Archaeopsylla erinacei (Bouché) and Spilopsyllus cuniculi (Dale). Further studies of possible disease agents in fox fleas could help elucidate possible risks of vector-borne disease in foxes, domestic animals, and humans as well.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Biodiversidade
Raposas/parasitologia
Sifonápteros
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Altitude
Animais
Feminino
Masculino
Romênia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170928
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170928
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170412
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjx067


  10 / 2943 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28399281
[Au] Autor:Nyirenda SS; Hang'ombe BM; Kilonzo BS; Kangwa HL; Mulenga E; Moonga L
[Ad] Endereço:Central Veterinary Research Institute, P.O. Box 33980, Balmoral, Lusaka, Zambia ( stanleynyirenda@yahoo.co.uk; henrylombekangwa@yahoo.com ).
[Ti] Título:Potential Roles of Pigs, Small Ruminants, Rodents, and Their Flea Vectors in Plague Epidemiology in Sinda District, Eastern Zambia.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;54(3):719-725, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Eastern part of Zambia that previously reported a plague outbreak. The aim of the study was to evaluate the potential role of pigs, goats, and sheep as sero-surveillance hosts for monitoring plague, and to investigate the flea vectors and potential reservoir hosts to establish the current status of plague endemicity in the district. Serum samples were collected from 96 rodents, 10 shrews, 245 domestic pigs, 232 goats, and 31 sheep, whereas 106 organs were eviscerated from rodents and shrews. As for fleas, 1,064 Echidnophaga larina Jordan & Rothschild, 7 Xenopsylla cheopis (Rothschild), and 382 Echidnophaga gallinacea (Westwood) were collected from these animals in 34 villages. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) tests were performed on serum, and organs and fleas to determine IgG antibodies against Fraction 1 antigen and pla gene of Yersinia pestis, respectively. ELISA results showed that 2.83% (95% CI = 0.59-8.05) rodents, 9.0% (95% CI = 5.71-13.28) domestic pigs, 4.7% (95% CI = 2.39-8.33) goats, and 3.2% (95% CI = 0.08-16.70) sheep were positive for IgG antibodies against Fra1 antigen of Y. pestis. On PCR, 8.4% (95% CI = 3.96-15.51) of the rodents were detected with Y. pestis pla gene, whereas all fleas were found negative. The common fleas identified were E. larina from pigs, whereas X. cheopis were the only fleas collected from rodents. The presence of sero-positive animals as well as the occurrence of X. cheopis on local rodents suggests that Y. pestis remains a risk in the district.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Monitoramento Epidemiológico/veterinária
Infestações por Pulgas/veterinária
Insetos Vetores/microbiologia
Peste/microbiologia
Doenças dos Roedores/epidemiologia
Sifonápteros/microbiologia
Yersinia pestis/isolamento & purificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antígenos de Bactérias/sangue
Proteínas de Bactérias/sangue
Estudos Transversais
Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática/veterinária
Infestações por Pulgas/epidemiologia
Infestações por Pulgas/parasitologia
Gado/microbiologia
Peste/transmissão
Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/veterinária
Doenças dos Roedores/microbiologia
Roedores
Zâmbia/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antigens, Bacterial); 0 (Bacterial Proteins)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170915
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170915
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170412
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjw220



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BIREME/OPAS/OMS - Centro Latino-Americano e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde