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  1 / 131 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29187604
[Au] Autor:Wong L; Grainger TN; Start D; Gilbert B
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3B2.
[Ti] Título:An invasive herbivore structures plant competitive dynamics.
[So] Source:Biol Lett;13(11), 2017 11.
[Is] ISSN:1744-957X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Species interactions are central to our understanding of ecological communities, but may change rapidly with the introduction of invasive species. Invasive species can alter species interactions and community dynamics directly by having larger detrimental effects on some species than others, or indirectly by changing the ways in which native species compete among themselves. We tested the direct and indirect effects of an invasive aphid herbivore on a native aphid species and two host milkweed species. The invasive aphid caused a 10-fold decrease in native aphid populations, and a 30% increase in plant mortality (direct effects). The invasive aphid also increased the strength of interspecific competition between the two native plant hosts (indirect effects). By investigating the role that indirect effects play in shaping species interactions in native communities, our study highlights an understudied component of species invasions.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Afídeos/fisiologia
Asclepias/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Herbivoria
Espécies Introduzidas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ecossistema
Comportamento Alimentar
América do Norte
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180204
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180204
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171201
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 131 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28961914
[Au] Autor:Pocius VM; Debinski DM; Pleasants JM; Bidne KG; Hellmich RL; Brower LP
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.
[Ti] Título:Milkweed Matters: Monarch Butterfly (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) Survival and Development on Nine Midwestern Milkweed Species.
[So] Source:Environ Entomol;46(5):1098-1105, 2017 10 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2936
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The population of monarch butterflies east of the Rocky Mountains has experienced a significant decline over the past 20 yr. In order to increase monarch numbers in the breeding range, habitat restoration that includes planting milkweed plants is essential. Milkweeds in the genus Asclepias and Cynanchum are the only host plants for larval monarch butterflies in North America, but larval performance and survival across nine milkweeds native to the Midwest is not well documented. We examined development and survival of monarchs from first-instar larval stages to adulthood on nine milkweed species native to Iowa. The milkweeds included Asclepias exaltata (poke milkweed) (Gentianales: Apocynaceae), Asclepias hirtella (tall green milkweed) (Gentianales: Apocynaceae), Asclepias incarnata (swamp milkweed) (Gentianales: Apocynaceae), Asclepias speciosa (showy milkweed) (Gentianales: Apocynaceae), Asclepias sullivantii (prairie milkweed) (Gentianales: Apocynaceae), Asclepias syriaca (common milkweed) (Gentianales: Apocynaceae), Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly milkweed) (Gentianales: Apocynaceae), Asclepias verticillata (whorled milkweed) (Gentianales: Apocynaceae), and Cynanchum laeve (honey vine milkweed) (Gentianales: Apocynaceae). In greenhouse experiments, fewer larvae that fed on Asclepias hirtella and Asclepias sullivantii reached adulthood compared with larvae that fed on the other milkweed species. Monarch pupal width and adult dry mass differed among milkweeds, but larval duration (days), pupal duration (days), pupal mass, pupal length, and adult wet mass were not significantly different. Both the absolute and relative adult lipids were different among milkweed treatments; these differences are not fully explained by differences in adult dry mass. Monarch butterflies can survive on all nine milkweed species, but the expected survival probability varied from 30 to 75% among the nine milkweed species.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Asclepias
Borboletas/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Herbivoria
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Borboletas/química
Feminino
Larva/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Lipídeos/análise
Masculino
Especificidade da Espécie
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Lipids)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171126
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171126
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170930
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/ee/nvx137


  3 / 131 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28708851
[Au] Autor:Pleasants JM; Zalucki MP; Oberhauser KS; Brower LP; Taylor OR; Thogmartin WE
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Interpreting surveys to estimate the size of the monarch butterfly population: Pitfalls and prospects.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0181245, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:To assess the change in the size of the eastern North American monarch butterfly summer population, studies have used long-term data sets of counts of adult butterflies or eggs per milkweed stem. Despite the observed decline in the monarch population as measured at overwintering sites in Mexico, these studies found no decline in summer counts in the Midwest, the core of the summer breeding range, leading to a suggestion that the cause of the monarch population decline is not the loss of Midwest agricultural milkweeds but increased mortality during the fall migration. Using these counts to estimate population size, however, does not account for the shift of monarch activity from agricultural fields to non-agricultural sites over the past 20 years, as a result of the loss of agricultural milkweeds due to the near-ubiquitous use of glyphosate herbicides. We present the counter-hypotheses that the proportion of the monarch population present in non-agricultural habitats, where counts are made, has increased and that counts reflect both population size and the proportion of the population observed. We use data on the historical change in the proportion of milkweeds, and thus monarch activity, in agricultural fields and non-agricultural habitats to show why using counts can produce misleading conclusions about population size. We then separate out the shifting proportion effect from the counts to estimate the population size and show that these corrected summer monarch counts show a decline over time and are correlated with the size of the overwintering population. In addition, we present evidence against the hypothesis of increased mortality during migration. The milkweed limitation hypothesis for monarch decline remains supported and conservation efforts focusing on adding milkweeds to the landscape in the summer breeding region have a sound scientific basis.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Borboletas/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Agricultura
Migração Animal
Animais
Asclepias/efeitos dos fármacos
Asclepias/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Asclepias/parasitologia
Borboletas/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Ecossistema
Herbicidas/toxicidade
México
Caules de Planta/parasitologia
Densidade Demográfica
Estações do Ano
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Herbicides)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170926
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170926
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170715
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0181245


  4 / 131 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28323544
[Au] Autor:Hoang K; Tao L; Hunter MD; de Roode JC
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biology, Emory University, 1510 Clifton Road, Atlanta, Georgia 30322. Correspondence should be sent to Kevin Hoang at: kevinmhoang3@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Host Diet Affects the Morphology of Monarch Butterfly Parasites.
[So] Source:J Parasitol;103(3):228-236, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1937-2345
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Understanding host-parasite interactions is essential for ecological research, wildlife conservation, and health management. While most studies focus on numerical traits of parasite groups, such as changes in parasite load, less focus is placed on the traits of individual parasites such as parasite size and shape (parasite morphology). Parasite morphology has significant effects on parasite fitness such as initial colonization of hosts, avoidance of host immune defenses, and the availability of resources for parasite replication. As such, understanding factors that affect parasite morphology is important in predicting the consequences of host-parasite interactions. Here, we studied how host diet affected the spore morphology of a protozoan parasite ( Ophryocystis elektroscirrha ), a specialist parasite of the monarch butterfly ( Danaus plexippus ). We found that different host plant species (milkweeds; Asclepias spp.) significantly affected parasite spore size. Previous studies have found that cardenolides, secondary chemicals in host plants of monarchs, can reduce parasite loads and increase the lifespan of infected butterflies. Adding to this benefit of high cardenolide milkweeds, we found that infected monarchs reared on milkweeds of higher cardenolide concentrations yielded smaller parasites, a potentially hidden characteristic of cardenolides that may have important implications for monarch-parasite interactions.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Apicomplexa/ultraestrutura
Borboletas/parasitologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Apicomplexa/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Asclepias/química
Borboletas/fisiologia
Cardenolídeos/metabolismo
Dieta
Feminino
Interações Hospedeiro-Parasita
Masculino
Esporos de Protozoários/ultraestrutura
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Cardenolides)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170628
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170628
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170322
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1645/16-142


  5 / 131 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28300580
[Au] Autor:Mebs D; Wunder C; Pogoda W; Toennes SW
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Legal Medicine, University of Frankfurt, Kennedyallee 104, D-60956 Frankfurt, Germany. Electronic address: mebs@em.uni-frankfurt.de.
[Ti] Título:Feeding on toxic prey. The praying mantis (Mantodea) as predator of poisonous butterfly and moth (Lepidoptera) caterpillars.
[So] Source:Toxicon;131:16-19, 2017 Jun 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3150
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Caterpillars of the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, feed on milkweed plants, Asclepias spp. (Apocynaceae), and sequester their toxic cardenolides aimed at deterring predators. Nevertheless, Chinese praying mantids, Tenodera sinensis, consume these caterpillars after removing the midgut ("gutting") including its plant content. In the present study, monarch caterpillars raised on A. curassavica, and those of the death's-head hawkmoth, Acherontia atropos, raised on Atropa belladonna containing atropine, were fed to mantids, Hierodula membranacea, which removed the gut of both species discarding about 59% of cardenolides and more than 90% of atropine, respectively. The ingestion of these compounds produced no apparent ill effects in the mantids and both were excreted with faeces. On the other hand, when mantids were fed with larvae of two moth species, Amata mogadorensis and Brahmaea certia, raised on non-poisonous host plants, the mantids showed the same gutting behaviour, thereby discarding indigestible plant material. As polar compounds, e.g. cardenolides and atropine, are not absorbed from the mantids midgut and do not pass the gut membrane, this enables the mantids to feed on toxic prey.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Borboletas
Mantódeos/fisiologia
Mariposas
Comportamento Predatório
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Asclepias/química
Cardenolídeos/química
Fezes/química
Intestinos
Larva
Plantas Tóxicas/química
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Cardenolides)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170928
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170928
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170317
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  6 / 131 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28284846
[Au] Autor:Mebs D; Wunder C; Toennes SW
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Legal Medicine, University of Frankfurt, Kennedyallee 104, D-60596, Frankfurt, Germany. Electronic address: mebs@em.uni-frankfurt.de.
[Ti] Título:Poor sequestration of toxic host plant cardenolides and their rapid loss in the milkweed butterfly Danaus chrysippus (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Danainae: Danaini).
[So] Source:Toxicon;131:1-5, 2017 Jun 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3150
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Butterflies of the genus Danaus are known to sequester toxic cardenolides from milkweed host plants (Apocynaceae). In particular, Danaus plexippus efficiently sequesters and stores these compounds, whereas D. chrysippus, is considered to poorly sequester cardenolides. To estimate its sequestration capability compared with that of D. plexippus, larvae of both species were jointly reared on Asclepias curassavica and the major cardenolides of the host plant, calotropin and calactin, were analyzed in adults sampled at different time intervals after eclosion. Both cardenolides were detected in body and wings of D. plexippus. Whereas the calotropin-concentration remained constant over a period of 24 days, that of calactin steadily decreased. In the body, but not in the wings of D. chrysippus, calactin only was detected in low amounts, which was then almost completely lost during the following 8 days after eclosion, suggesting that in contrast to D. plexippus, cardenolides seem to be less important for that butterfly's defence against predators.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Asclepias/química
Borboletas/metabolismo
Cardenolídeos/metabolismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Borboletas/classificação
Cardenolídeos/isolamento & purificação
Feminino
Larva
Masculino
Asas de Animais/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Cardenolides); 0 (calotropin)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170928
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170928
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170313
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 131 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28104591
[Au] Autor:La Rosa RJ; Conner JK
[Ad] Endereço:W. K. Kellogg Biological Station, Department of Plant Biology, and Program in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior, Michigan State University, 3700 E. Gull Lake Dr., Hickory Corners, Michigan 49060 raffica.larosa@colorado.edu.
[Ti] Título:Floral function: effects of traits on pollinators, male and female pollination success, and female fitness across three species of milkweeds (Asclepias).
[So] Source:Am J Bot;104(1):150-160, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2197
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Central questions in plant reproductive ecology are whether the functions of floral traits in hermaphrodites create conflict between sexes that could slow evolution, and whether individual floral traits function in pollinator attraction, efficiency, or both. We studied how floral traits affect pollinator visitation and efficiency, and how they affect male and female function and female fitness within and across three Asclepias species that differ in floral morphology. METHODS: Using separate multiple regressions, we regressed pollen removal, deposition, and fruit number onto six floral traits. We also used path analyses integrating these variables with pollinator visitation data for two of the species to further explore floral function and its effects on fruit production. KEY RESULTS: Most traits affected male pollination success only, and these effects often differed between species. The exception was increased slit length, which increased pollinia insertion in two of the species. There were no interspecific differences in the effects of the traits on female pollination success. All traits except horn reach affected pollination efficiency in at least one species, and horn reach and two hood dimensions were the only traits to affect pollinator attraction, but in just one species. CONCLUSIONS: Traits tended to function in only one sex, and more traits affected function through pollinator efficiency than through attraction. There was no significant link between female pollination success and female fitness in any of the three species; this pattern is consistent with fruit production not being limited by pollen deposition.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Asclepias/fisiologia
Flores/fisiologia
Pólen/fisiologia
Polinização/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adaptação Fisiológica/fisiologia
Análise de Variância
Animais
Asclepias/classificação
Asclepias/parasitologia
Flores/anatomia & histologia
Flores/parasitologia
Frutas/anatomia & histologia
Frutas/parasitologia
Frutas/fisiologia
Insetos/classificação
Insetos/fisiologia
Pólen/anatomia & histologia
Pólen/parasitologia
Reprodução
Especificidade da Espécie
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170121
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3732/ajb.1600328


  8 / 131 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28100180
[Au] Autor:Matsuura K; Hatta S; Terasaka Y; Inoue Y
[Ad] Endereço:Nojima Hospital, 2714-1, Sesaki-machi, Kurayoshi-city, Tottori, 682-0863, Japan. matsuura.kzk@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Extensive bilateral corneal edema 6 weeks after cataract surgery: Keratopathy due to Asclepias physocarpa: a case report.
[So] Source:BMC Ophthalmol;17(1):5, 2017 Jan 18.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2415
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Surgeons may be unaware of the ability of plant toxins to cause corneal damage. Therefore, corneal damage following intraocular surgery due to plant toxins may be misdiagnosed as postoperative infection. CASE PRESENTATION: A 74-year-old man presented with hyperemia and reduced visual acuity in both eyes 6 weeks after uneventful cataract surgery. We observed extensive hyperemia and corneal stromal edema with Descemet's folds in both eyes. After obtaining a detailed patient history, we diagnosed plant toxin-induced corneal edema due to Asclepias physocarpa, which can induce corneal edema by inhibiting the Na /K ATPase activity of the corneal endothelium. Antimicrobial and steroid eye drops and an oral steroid were prescribed accordingly. Symptons began to improve on day 3 and had almost completely resolved by day 6. At 1 month, the patient had fully recovered without any sequelae. CONCLUSION: The correct diagnosis was possible in the present case as symptoms were bilateral and the patient was able to report his potential exposure to plant toxins. However, if the symptoms had been unilateral and the patient had been unaware of these toxins, he may have undergone unnecessary surgical interventions to treat non-existent postoperative endophthalmitis.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Asclepias/toxicidade
Extração de Catarata
Edema da Córnea/etiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Idoso
Jardinagem
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1702
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170224
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170224
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12886-017-0400-z


  9 / 131 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28099501
[Au] Autor:Satterfield DA; Altizer S; Williams MK; Hall RJ
[Ad] Endereço:Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Environmental Persistence Influences Infection Dynamics for a Butterfly Pathogen.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(1):e0169982, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Many pathogens, including those infecting insects, are transmitted via dormant stages shed into the environment, where they must persist until encountering a susceptible host. Understanding how abiotic conditions influence environmental persistence and how these factors influence pathogen spread are crucial for predicting patterns of infection risk. Here, we explored the consequences of environmental transmission for infection dynamics of a debilitating protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha) that infects monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus). We first conducted an experiment to observe the persistence of protozoan spores exposed to natural conditions. Experimental results showed that, contrary to our expectations, pathogen doses maintained high infectivity even after 16 days in the environment, although pathogens did yield infections with lower parasite loads after environmental exposure. Because pathogen longevity exceeded the time span of our experiment, we developed a mechanistic model to better explore environmental persistence for this host-pathogen system. Model analysis showed that, in general, longer spore persistence led to higher infection prevalence and slightly smaller monarch population sizes. The model indicated that typical parasite doses shed onto milkweed plants must remain viable for a minimum of 3 weeks for prevalence to increase during the summer-breeding season, and for 11 weeks or longer to match levels of infection commonly reported from the wild, assuming moderate values for parasite shedding rate. Our findings showed that transmission stages of this butterfly pathogen are long-lived and indicated that this is a necessary condition for the protozoan to persist in local monarch populations. This study provides a modeling framework for future work examining the dynamics of an ecologically important pathogen in an iconic insect.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Borboletas/parasitologia
Interações Hospedeiro-Parasita
Sarcocystis/patogenicidade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Asclepias/parasitologia
Folhas de Planta/parasitologia
Densidade Demográfica
Sarcocystis/fisiologia
Sarcocistose/transmissão
Sarcocistose/veterinária
Esporos de Protozoários/patogenicidade
Esporos de Protozoários/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170811
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170811
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170119
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0169982


  10 / 131 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27683239
[Au] Autor:Dalla S; Dobler S
[Ad] Endereço:Molecular Evolutionary Biology, Zoological Institute, Biocenter Grindel, University of Hamburg, 20146, Hamburg, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Gene duplications circumvent trade-offs in enzyme function: Insect adaptation to toxic host plants.
[So] Source:Evolution;70(12):2767-2777, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1558-5646
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Herbivorous insects and their adaptations against plant toxins provide striking opportunities to investigate the genetic basis of traits involved in coevolutionary interactions. Target site insensitivity to cardenolides has evolved convergently across six orders of insects, involving identical substitutions in the Na,K-ATPase gene and repeated convergent gene duplications. The large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, has three copies of the Na,K-ATPase α-subunit gene that bear differing numbers of amino acid substitutions in the binding pocket for cardenolides. To analyze the effect of these substitutions on cardenolide resistance and to infer possible trade-offs in gene function, we expressed the cardenolide-sensitive Na,K-ATPase of Drosophila melanogaster in vitro and introduced four distinct combinations of substitutions observed in the three gene copies of O. fasciatus. With an increasing number of substitutions, the sensitivity of the Na,K-ATPase to a standard cardenolide decreased in a stepwise manner. At the same time, the enzyme's overall activity decreased significantly with increasing cardenolide resistance and only the least substituted mimic of the Na,K-ATPase α1C copy maintained activity similar to the wild-type enzyme. Our results suggest that the Na,K-ATPase copies in O. fasciatus have diverged in function, enabling specific adaptations to dietary cardenolides while maintaining the functionality of this critical ion carrier.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Substituição de Aminoácidos
Cardenolídeos/metabolismo
Duplicação Gênica
Heterópteros/fisiologia
Análise de Sequência de DNA
ATPase Trocadora de Sódio-Potássio/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adaptação Biológica
Animais
Antibiose
Asclepias/química
Proteínas de Drosophila/genética
Proteínas de Drosophila/metabolismo
Drosophila melanogaster/genética
Drosophila melanogaster/metabolismo
Herbivoria
Heterópteros/enzimologia
Heterópteros/genética
ATPase Trocadora de Sódio-Potássio/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Cardenolides); 0 (Drosophila Proteins); EC 3.6.3.9 (ATPalpha protein, Drosophila); EC 3.6.3.9 (Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170920
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170920
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160930
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/evo.13077



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