Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : B01.650.940.800.575.912.250.859.937.437.111 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 22 [refinar]
Mostrando: 1 .. 10   no formato [Detalhado]

página 1 de 3 ir para página          

  1 / 22 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:24833390
[Au] Autor:Soria-Carrasco V; Gompert Z; Comeault AA; Farkas TE; Parchman TL; Johnston JS; Buerkle CA; Feder JL; Bast J; Schwander T; Egan SP; Crespi BJ; Nosil P
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK.
[Ti] Título:Stick insect genomes reveal natural selection's role in parallel speciation.
[So] Source:Science;344(6185):738-42, 2014 May 16.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Natural selection can drive the repeated evolution of reproductive isolation, but the genomic basis of parallel speciation remains poorly understood. We analyzed whole-genome divergence between replicate pairs of stick insect populations that are adapted to different host plants and undergoing parallel speciation. We found thousands of modest-sized genomic regions of accentuated divergence between populations, most of which are unique to individual population pairs. We also detected parallel genomic divergence across population pairs involving an excess of coding genes with specific molecular functions. Regions of parallel genomic divergence in nature exhibited exceptional allele frequency changes between hosts in a field transplant experiment. The results advance understanding of biological diversification by providing convergent observational and experimental evidence for selection's role in driving repeatable genomic divergence.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ceanothus
Especiação Genética
Genoma de Inseto
Insetos/genética
Seleção Genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Frequência do Gene
Variação Genética
Herbivoria
Insetos/classificação
Filogenia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1406
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:140517
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1126/science.1252136


  2 / 22 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:24817157
[Au] Autor:Pittermann J; Lance J; Poster L; Baer A; Fox LR
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA, 95064, USA, jpitterm@ucsc.edu.
[Ti] Título:Heavy browsing affects the hydraulic capacity of Ceanothus rigidus (Rhamnaceae).
[So] Source:Oecologia;175(3):801-10, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1939
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Defoliation by herbivores can reduce carbon assimilation, change plant water relations, and even shift the biotic structure of plant communities. In this study, we took advantage of a long-term deer exclosure experiment to examine the consequences of persistent deer herbivory on plant water relations and the xylem structure-function relationships in Ceanothus rigidus, a maritime chaparral shrub in coastal California. Browsed plants had thicker stems with many intertwined short distal twigs, and significantly higher sapwood-to-leaf area ratios than their non-browsed counterparts. Leaf area-specific hydraulic conductivity was similar in both browsed and non-browsed plants, but xylem area-specific conductivity was significantly lower in the browsed plants. Vessel diameters were equivalent in both plant groups, but the number of vessels on a transverse area basis was nearly 40% lower in the browsed plants, accounting for their lower transport efficiency. Mid-day in situ water potentials and losses of hydraulic conductivity due to embolism were similar in both groups of plants but stomatal conductance was higher in the browsed shrubs in the early part of the growing season. We discuss our findings in the context of whole-plant ecophysiology, and explore the consequences of herbivory on hormonal signals, wood anatomy, and xylem function.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ceanothus/fisiologia
Herbivoria
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
California
Cervos
Fotossíntese
Folhas de Planta/metabolismo
Estações do Ano
Água/metabolismo
Madeira
Xilema/anatomia & histologia
Xilema/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
059QF0KO0R (Water)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1411
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171010
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171010
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:140513
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00442-014-2947-1


  3 / 22 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:24091781
[Au] Autor:Lucas TA; Johns G; Jiang W; Yang L
[Ad] Endereço:Mathematics Department, Pepperdine University, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu, CA, 90263, USA, timothy.lucas@pepperdine.edu.
[Ti] Título:A population model of chaparral vegetation response to frequent wildfires.
[So] Source:Bull Math Biol;75(12):2324-45, 2013 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1522-9602
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The recent increase in wildfire frequency in the Santa Monica Mountains (SMM) may substantially impact plant community structure. Species of Chaparral shrubs represent the dominant vegetation type in the SMM. These species can be divided into three life history types according to their response to wildfires. Nonsprouting species are completely killed by fire and reproduce by seeds that germinate in response to a fire cue, obligate sprouting species survive by resprouting from dormant buds in a root crown because their seeds are destroyed by fire, and facultative sprouting species recover after fire both by seeds and resprouts. Based on these assumptions, we developed a set of nonlinear difference equations to model each life history type. These models can be used to predict species survivorship under varying fire return intervals. For example, frequent fires can lead to localized extinction of nonsprouting species such as Ceanothus megacarpus while several facultative sprouting species such as Ceanothus spinosus and Malosma (Rhus) laurina will persist as documented by a longitudinal study in a biological preserve in the SMM. We estimated appropriate parameter values for several chaparral species using 25 years of data and explored parameter relationships that lead to equilibrium populations. We conclude by looking at the survival strategies of these three species of chaparral shrubs under varying fire return intervals and predict changes in plant community structure under fire intervals of short return. In particular, our model predicts that an average fire return interval of greater than 12 years is required for 50 % of the initial Ceanothus megacarpus population and 25 % of the initial Ceanothus spinosus population to survive. In contrast, we predict that the Malosma laurina population will have 90 % survivorship for an average fire return interval of at least 6 years.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ceanothus/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Fogo
Modelos Biológicos
Rhus/crescimento & desenvolvimento
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: California
Biologia Computacional
Ecossistema
Conceitos Matemáticos
Sementes/crescimento & desenvolvimento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1408
[Cu] Atualização por classe:131115
[Lr] Data última revisão:
131115
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:131005
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11538-013-9894-6


  4 / 22 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:24018856
[Au] Autor:Burge DO; Hopkins R; Tsai YH; Manos PS
[Ad] Endereço:Duke University Department of Biology, Box 90338 Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA.
[Ti] Título:Limited hybridization across an edaphic disjunction between the gabbro-endemic shrub Ceanothus roderickii (Rhamnaceae) and the soil-generalist Ceanothus cuneatus.
[So] Source:Am J Bot;100(9):1883-95, 2013 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2197
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Hybridization is thought to have played an important role in diversification of the speciose shrub genus Ceanothus; putative hybrid species have been described, and data suggest that intrinsic barriers may not exist among closely related species. However, the extent to which hybridization occurs in the wild is not known, and little is understood about how extrinsic factors such as soil chemistry may influence the process. The present research focuses on the gabbro-endemic C. roderickii and the closely related soil-generalist C. cuneatus. Though the species occur peripatrically, they remain distinct across an edaphic disjunction. • METHODS: AFLP was used to quantify hybridization and introgression. Biological data and experiments were used to test for prezygotic isolation. Growth trials were used to test for local adaptation and selection against hybrids. • KEY RESULTS: Ceanothus cuneatus and C. roderickii were strongly differentiated morphologically and genetically, despite a lack of evidence for prezygotic barriers. Hybrids and back-crosses were present but infrequent. Finally, there was selection against hybrids in nonnative soil. • CONCLUSIONS: There is little genetic exchange between the focal species across an edaphic disjunction, despite the absence of prezygotic barriers. This result implies that soil conditions, as well as other extrinsic factors, should be considered as forces that may restrict hybridization and gene flow in Ceanothus, influencing local adaptation and speciation. Findings presented here are significant because they imply that exchange of genetic material between plants may be limited directly by the abiotic environment, rather than by the biology of the plants.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ceanothus/genética
Hibridização Genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adaptação Biológica
Análise do Polimorfismo de Comprimento de Fragmentos Amplificados
Ecologia
Meio Ambiente
Isolamento Reprodutivo
Solo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Soil)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1404
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:130911
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3732/ajb.1200604


  5 / 22 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
PubMed Central Texto completo
Texto completo
[PMID]:22348051
[Au] Autor:Schwilk DW; Keeley JE
[Ad] Endereço:Biological Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, United States of America. dylan.schwilk@ttu.edu
[Ti] Título:A plant distribution shift: temperature, drought or past disturbance?
[So] Source:PLoS One;7(2):e31173, 2012.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Simple models of plant response to warming climates predict vegetation moving to cooler and/or wetter locations: in mountainous regions shifting upslope. However, species-specific responses to climate change are likely to be much more complex. We re-examined a recently reported vegetation shift in the Santa Rosa Mountains, California, to better understand the mechanisms behind the reported shift of a plant distribution upslope. We focused on five elevational zones near the center of the gradient that captured many of the reported shifts and which are dominated by fire-prone chaparral. Using growth rings, we determined that a major assumption of the previous work was wrong: past fire histories differed among elevations. To examine the potential effect that this difference might have on the reported upward shift, we focused on one species, Ceanothus greggii: a shrub that only recruits post-fire from a soil stored seedbank. For five elevations used in the prior study, we calculated time series of past per-capita mortality rates by counting growth rings on live and dead individuals. We tested three alternative hypotheses explaining the past patterns of mortality: 1) mortality increased over time consistent with climate warming, 2) mortality was correlated with drought indices, and 3) mortality peaked 40-50 years post fire at each site, consistent with self-thinning. We found that the sites were different ages since the last fire, and that the reported increase in the mean elevation of C. greggii was due to higher recent mortality at the lower elevations, which were younger sites. The time-series pattern of mortality was best explained by the self-thinning hypothesis and poorly explained by gradual warming or drought. At least for this species, the reported distribution shift appears to be an artifact of disturbance history and is not evidence of a climate warming effect.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ceanothus/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Mudança Climática
Demografia
Modelos Biológicos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Artefatos
Secas
Fogo
Temperatura Ambiente
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1207
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:120221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0031173


  6 / 22 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
[PMID]:21661563
[Au] Autor:Coale TH; Deveny AJ; Fox LR
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA.
[Ti] Título:Growth, fire history, and browsing recorded in wood rings of shrubs in a mild temperate climate.
[So] Source:Ecology;92(5):1020-6, 2011 May.
[Is] ISSN:0012-9658
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Separate effects of abiotic and biotic factors on the structure and dynamics of ecological communities may be recorded in growth rings of woody plants. We used Ceanothus cuneatus rigidus and Arctostaphylos pumila to tease apart the roles of fire, rain, and herbivores on the histories and community structure of four areas in a coastal mediterranean-type climate in central California with mild winters and mild summers. Ring widths of both species were related to rainfall in two of the areas; heavy deer browsing on Ceanothus overwhelmed the climate signal in the others. Ceanothus germination was more closely related to heavy rainfall, especially during ENSO years, than to fire events. In a related greenhouse experiment that evaluated these observations, the same proportions of new Ceanothus seeds germinated after burning and after receiving regular water for several months, but germination of old seeds responded primarily to the fire treatment. In areas where heavy browsing by mammals reduces recruitment and growth of Ceanothus and increases mortality, the continuance of the Ceanothus population must rely heavily on germination from the persistent seed bank during unusually wet years or after occasional fires. Because Arctostaphylos can produce new stems from underground roots, individual plants may survive and produce seeds until another fire.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Arctostaphylos/fisiologia
Ceanothus/fisiologia
Clima
Fogo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
California
Ecossistema
Chuvas
Sementes/fisiologia
Fatores de Tempo
Madeira
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1107
[Cu] Atualização por classe:110613
[Lr] Data última revisão:
110613
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:110614
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 22 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
[PMID]:20462125
[Au] Autor:Regan HM; Crookston JB; Swab R; Franklin J; Lawson DM
[Ad] Endereço:Biology Department, University of California, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, California 92521, USA. helen.regan@ucr.edu
[Ti] Título:Habitat fragmentation and altered fire regime create trade-offs for an obligate seeding shrub.
[So] Source:Ecology;91(4):1114-23, 2010 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0012-9658
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Habitat loss is widely considered the greatest threat to biodiversity. However, habitat loss brings with it myriad other threats that exacerbate impacts to biodiversity. For instance, altered fire regime is associated with habitat loss and fragmentation with unknown consequences to biodiversity. Plant functional groups that rely on fire to complete their life cycle may be adversely affected by disruptions to the natural fire regime, particularly when coupled with population declines due to habitat loss. We used a spatially explicit stochastic population model linked with fire hazard functions to investigate the cumulative effects of habitat loss, fragmentation, and altered fire regime on the expected minimum abundance of a long-lived obligate-seeding shrub, Ceanothus greggii var. perplexans. This species is endemic to the California Floristic Province, a biodiversity hotspot, and is representative of a functional group of plants found in many fire-prone ecosystems. We tested the impact of a range of different fire frequencies under three different combinations of fuel accumulation and weather. The best average fire return interval for population abundance was consistently in the range of 30-50 years. However, observed average fire return intervals in highly fragmented areas can be approximately 20 years or less, and model results show this to be detrimental to C. greggii populations. Results also show that if fires are uncorrelated across habitat fragments then the impact of altered fire regime on populations is worse than the impact of habitat fragmentation because of spatial and temporal decoupling of fire events across the landscape. However, the negative impacts of altered fire regime are outweighed by habitat loss as fragmentation increases. Our results show that large unplanned fires, operating under an altered fire regime, are ultimately detrimental to perennial obligate-seeding shrubs in fragmented landscapes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ceanothus/fisiologia
Ecossistema
Fogo
Sementes
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: California
Demografia
Reprodução
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Mês de entrada:1006
[Cu] Atualização por classe:100513
[Lr] Data última revisão:
100513
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:100514
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 22 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:19245395
[Au] Autor:Nosil P
[Ad] Endereço:Zoology Department and Biodiversity Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada. patrik.nosil@wiko-berlin.de
[Ti] Título:Adaptive population divergence in cryptic color-pattern following a reduction in gene flow.
[So] Source:Evolution;63(7):1902-12, 2009 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1558-5646
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Adaptive population divergence is often driven by divergent natural selection, but can be constrained by the homogenizing effect of gene flow between populations. Indeed, a common pattern in nature is an inverse correlation between the degree of adaptive phenotypic divergence between populations and levels of gene flow between populations. However, there is essentially no experimental data on whether this correlation arises because gene flow constrains adaptation or, conversely, because adaptive divergence causes barriers to gene flow (ecological speciation). Here, I report increased adaptive divergence in cryptic color pattern between a pair of Timema insect populations following an experimental reduction in between-population gene flow. The reduction in gene flow arose due to a natural experiment, and thus was not replicated at a second site. However, temporal replication of the trends among six generations of data, coupled with a lack of increased adaptive divergence for two other population pairs where gene flow was not manipulated (i.e., control sites), argues that the results did not arise by chance. Estimates of dispersal ability and population size further support reduced gene flow, rather than increased genetic drift, as the cause of divergence. Thus, the findings provide experimental evidence that gene flow constrains adaptation in nature.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Adaptação Biológica/genética
Cor
Fluxo Gênico
Insetos/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ceanothus
Deriva Genética
Insetos/anatomia & histologia
Dinâmica Populacional
Rosaceae
Seleção Genética
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:0909
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:090228
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00671.x


  9 / 22 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
[PMID]:18831166
[Au] Autor:Karban R
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis, California 95616-8584, USA. rkarban@ucdavis.edu
[Ti] Título:Leaf drop in evergreen Ceanothus velutinus as a means of reducing herbivory.
[So] Source:Ecology;89(9):2446-52, 2008 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0012-9658
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Conventional explanations for deciduousness do not include losses to herbivory. However, a recent explanation posits that deciduous leaf drop allows trees to reduce their herbivore loads and that this benefit of the deciduous habit may partly offset lost opportunities for photosynthesis. Much of the damage caused by chewing herbivores occurs early in the season when adult insects colonize as new leaves are expanding; trees without leaves from previous leaf flushes at this time are less attractive and suffer less cost of herbivory. I tested this hypothesis using Ceanothus velutinus, an evergreen shrub that shows considerable individual variation in leaf retention. Stems that held more leaves through winter experienced more chewing damage the following season. Stems with leaves experimentally removed through winter also were less likely to receive chewing damage the following season. At least some herbivores in this system make oviposition decisions before new leaves have expanded, and old leaves may provide cues about the suitability of the stem. Holding leaves through winter increased the likelihood of herbivory, and experimental protection from herbivores caused 60% greater inflorescence production compared to unprotected stems. However, the cost of leaf retention was more than offset by an overall benefit. Stems that were allowed to keep winter leaves produced larger new leaves in summer and expanded them more rapidly in the season than stems with winter leaves experimentally removed. As a result, stems with leaves through winter experienced higher survival, four times as many inflorescences, and 40 times as many fruits as shoots that were experimentally defoliated. Losses to herbivores may be an unappreciated cost of leaf retention, and cost-benefit models of deciduous and evergreen behavior should include these losses.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ceanothus/fisiologia
Comportamento Alimentar/fisiologia
Invertebrados/fisiologia
Folhas de Planta/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Estações do Ano
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:0810
[Cu] Atualização por classe:081003
[Lr] Data última revisão:
081003
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:081004
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  10 / 22 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
[PMID]:17479294
[Au] Autor:Nippert JB; Knapp AK
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Biology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. gostate@ku.edu
[Ti] Título:Linking water uptake with rooting patterns in grassland species.
[So] Source:Oecologia;153(2):261-72, 2007 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0029-8549
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Water availability strongly governs grassland primary productivity, yet this resource varies dramatically in time (seasonally) and space (with soil depth and topography). It has long been assumed that co-occurring species differ in their partitioning of water use by depth, but direct evidence is lacking. We report data from two growing seasons (2004-2005) in which we measured the isotopic signature of plant xylem water from seven species (including C(3) forbs and shrubs and C(4) grasses) growing along a topographic gradient at the Konza Prairie Biological Station. Plant xylem stable oxygen isotope ratio (delta(18)O) values were compared to soil water delta(18)O profiles, recent rainfall events, and groundwater. Species varied in both their temporal patterns of water use and their responses to seasonal droughts in both years. During wet periods, species differences in water use were minimal, with common dependency on recent rainfall events stored in the upper soil layers. However, during dry periods, most C(3) species used proportionally more water from deeper portions of the soil profile relative to the C(4) grasses. Plants in uplands used more shallow soil water compared to those in lowlands, with the greatest differences across the topographic gradient occurring during dry periods. While the documented vertical root distribution varies by species and growth form in this grassland, each of the species we measured appeared to compete for the same surface layer soil moisture when water was not limiting. Thus, our results suggest that variation in precipitation history and landscape positions are greater determinants of water-use patterns than would be expected based on absolute rooting depth.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ecossistema
Raízes de Plantas/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Poaceae/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Poaceae/metabolismo
Água/metabolismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Ceanothus/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Ceanothus/metabolismo
Kansas
Lespedeza/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Lespedeza/metabolismo
Chuvas
Solo
Vernonia/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Vernonia/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Soil); 059QF0KO0R (Water)
[Em] Mês de entrada:0710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:070505
[St] Status:MEDLINE



página 1 de 3 ir para página          
   


Refinar a pesquisa
  Base de dados : MEDLINE Formulário avançado   

    Pesquisar no campo  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/OPAS/OMS - Centro Latino-Americano e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde