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[PMID]:29351278
[Au] Autor:Atkinson TP; Centor RM; Xiao L; Wang F; Cui X; Van Der Pol W; Morrow CD; Ratliff AE; Crabb DM; Totten AH; Estrada CA; Faircloth MB; Waites KB
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Analysis of the tonsillar microbiome in young adults with sore throat reveals a high relative abundance of Fusobacterium necrophorum with low diversity.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0189423, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Fusobacterium necrophorum (Fn), a gram-negative anaerobe, is increasingly implicated as an etiologic agent in older adolescents and young adults with sore throat. Inadequately treated Fn pharyngitis may result in suppurative complications such as peritonsillar abscess and Lemierre's syndrome. Data from the literature suggest that the incidence of life-threating complications in these age groups from Fn pharyngitis (Lemierre's syndrome) in the United States exceeds those associated with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis (acute rheumatic fever). Using real-time PCR, we previously reported about a 10% prevalence of Fn in asymptomatic medical students and about 20% in students complaining of sore throat at a university student health clinic (p = 0.009). In this study, a comprehensive microbiome analysis of the same study samples confirms that Fn pharyngitis was more common than GAS pharyngitis. Eighteen patients were found to have Fn OTU values exceeding an arbitrary cutoff value of 0.1, i.e. greater than 10% of total sequences, with five subjects reaching values above 0.7. By contrast only 9 patients had GAS OTU values greater than 0.1 and none exceeded 0.6. When the data were analyzed using five separate assessments of alpha diversity, in each case for Fn there were statistically significant differences between Fn positive_high (OTU abundance > 0.1) vs control, Fn positive_high vs Fn negative (OTU abundance = 0), Fn positive_high vs Fn positive_low (OTU abundance > 0 and < 0.1). When the data were analyzed using three beta diversity indexes (Bray-Curtis, weighted unifrac, and unweighted unifrac), there were statistically significant differences between Fn positive_high (OTU abundance ≥ 0.1) vs control for all three. Statistically significant differences remained if we chose somewhat different OTU abundance cutoffs of 0.05 or 0.15. We conclude that Fn appears to play a dominant role in bacterial pharyngitis in the older adolescent and young adult age groups and that the development of a productive mucosal infection with Fn is linked to a significant decrease in the diversity of the associated tonsillar microbiome.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fusobacterium necrophorum/fisiologia
Microbiota
Tonsila Palatina/microbiologia
Faringite/microbiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Estudos de Casos e Controles
Feminino
Fusobacterium necrophorum/genética
Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala
Seres Humanos
Masculino
RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética
Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180215
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180215
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189423


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[PMID]:28579042
[Au] Autor:Van Metre DC
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, 300 W. Drake Road, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1678, USA. Electronic address: dcvanm@colostate.edu.
[Ti] Título:Pathogenesis and Treatment of Bovine Foot Rot.
[So] Source:Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract;33(2):183-194, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1558-4240
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Bovine foot rot (BFR) is an infectious disease of the interdigital skin and subcutaneous tissues of beef and dairy cattle that occurs under a variety of management and environmental settings. The anaerobic, gram-negative bacteria Fusobacterium necrophorum, Porphyromonas levii, and Prevotella intermedia are commonly isolated from lesions. A multitude of host, agent, and environmental factors contribute to the development of BFR. Initiation of systemic antimicrobial therapy early in the course of disease commonly leads to resolution. Delays in treatment may result in extension of infection into deeper bone, synovial structures, or ligamentous structures, and the prognosis for recovery is reduced.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doenças dos Bovinos
Pododermatite Necrótica dos Ovinos
Coxeadura Animal
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Infecções por Bacteroidaceae/tratamento farmacológico
Infecções por Bacteroidaceae/microbiologia
Bovinos
Doenças dos Bovinos/tratamento farmacológico
Doenças dos Bovinos/microbiologia
Pododermatite Necrótica dos Ovinos/tratamento farmacológico
Pododermatite Necrótica dos Ovinos/microbiologia
Infecções por Fusobacterium/tratamento farmacológico
Infecções por Fusobacterium/microbiologia
Fusobacterium necrophorum/fisiologia
Coxeadura Animal/tratamento farmacológico
Coxeadura Animal/microbiologia
Porphyromonas/fisiologia
Prevotella intermedia/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171109
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171109
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170606
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28390644
[Au] Autor:Mourad MR; Siwoski OM; Brownback KR
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS.
[Ti] Título:A 19-Year-Old College Student With Headache, Photophobia, and Flulike Illness.
[So] Source:Chest;151(4):e95-e98, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1931-3543
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:CASE PRESENTATION: A 19-year-old previously healthy man presented, minimally responsive, in respiratory distress to an ED after a 2-week history of headache, photophobia, and neck stiffness. Associated symptoms included low-grade fevers, malaise, and dark urine. He had no recent travel, ill contacts, consumption of undercooked meat, new sexual contacts, or illicit drug use. The patient resided in a campus dormitory and did not consume alcohol or tobacco.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Enterite/microbiologia
Infecções por Fusobacterium/microbiologia
Fusobacterium necrophorum/isolamento & purificação
Linfo-Histiocitose Hemofagocítica/microbiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Dexametasona/uso terapêutico
Diagnóstico Diferencial
Enterite/tratamento farmacológico
Infecções por Fusobacterium/tratamento farmacológico
Glucocorticoides/uso terapêutico
Cefaleia
Seres Humanos
Linfo-Histiocitose Hemofagocítica/tratamento farmacológico
Masculino
Fotofobia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Glucocorticoids); 7S5I7G3JQL (Dexamethasone)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170515
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170515
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170410
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28260599
[Au] Autor:Klug TE
[Ad] Endereço:tejsehlersklug@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Peritonsillar abscess: clinical aspects of microbiology, risk factors, and the association with parapharyngeal abscess.
[So] Source:Dan Med J;64(3), 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2245-1919
[Cp] País de publicação:Denmark
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PTA is a collection of pus located between the tonsillar capsule and the pharyngeal constrictor muscle. It is considered a complication of acute tonsillitis and is the most prevalent deep neck infection (approximately 2000 cases annually in Denmark) and cause of acute admission to Danish ENT departments. Teenagers and young adults are most commonly affected and males may predominate over females. However, no studies of age- and gender-stratified incidence rates have previously been published. Furthermore, smoking may be associated with increased risk of peritonsillar abscess (PTA) development, although the magnitude of the association has not been estimated. Complications are relatively rare. They include parapharyngeal abscess (PPA), upper airway obstruction, Lemierre´s syndrome, necrotizing fasciitis, mediastinitis, erosion of the internal carotid artery, brain abscess, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The treatment consists of abscess drainage and antimicrobial therapy. There are three accepted methods of surgical intervension: needle aspiration, incision and drainage (ID), and acute tonsillectomy (á chaud). Internationally, there is a strong trend towards less invasive surgical approach to PTA treatment with avoidance of acute tonsillectomy, needle aspiration instead of ID, and in some cases even antibiotic treatment without surgical drainage. The preferred antibiotic regimen varies greatly between countries and centers. Group A streptococcus (GAS) is the only established pathogen in PTA. However, GAS is only recovered from approximately 20% of PTA patients. The pathogens in the remaining 80% are unknown. Culturing of PTA pus aspirates often yields a polymicrobial mixture of aerobes and anaerobes. As the tonsils of healthy individuals are already heavily and diversely colonized, the identification of significant pathogens is challenging. In addition, when studying PTA microbiology, one must consider diagnostic precision, collection, handling, and transportation of appropriate specimens, choice of methodology for detection and quantification of microorganisms, current or recent antibiotic treatment of patients, potential shift in significant pathogens during the course of infection, and factors associated with increased risk of PTA development.  The trend towards de-escalated surgical intervention and increasing reliance on antibiotic treatment, require studies defining the significant pathogens in PTA in order to determine optimal antibiotic regimens. Complications secondary to PTA may be avoided or better controlled with improved knowledge concerning the significant pathogens in PTA. Furthermore, identification of pathogens other than GAS, may lead the way for earlier bacterial diagnosis and timely intervention before abscess formation in sore throat patients. The identification and quantification of risk factors for PTA development constitutes another approach to reduce the incidence of PTA. As clinicians, we noticed that FN was recovered from PTA patients with increasing frequency and that patients infected with Fusobacterium necrophorum (FN) seemed to be more severely affected than patients infected with other bacteria. Furthermore, we occationally observed concomitant PPA in addition to a PTA, which made us hypothesize that PPA and PTA is often closely related and may share significant pathogens. Hence, our aims were: 1. To explore the microbiology of PTA with a special attention to Fusobacterium necrophorum (FN). 2. To elucidate whether smoking, age, gender, and seasons are risk factors for the development of PTA. 3. To characterize patients with PPA, explore the relationship between PPA and PTA, identify the pathogens associated with PPA, and review our management of PPA. In a retrospective study on all 847 PTA patients admitted to the ENT department at Aarhus University Hospital (AUH) from 2001 to 2006, we found that FN was the most prevalent (23%) bacterial strain in pus specimens. FN-positive patients displayed significantly higher infection markers (CRP and neutrophil counts) than patients infected with other bacteria (P = 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively). In a subsequent prospective and comparative study on 36 PTA patients and 80 patients undergoing elective tonsillectomy (controls), we recovered FN from 58% of PTA aspirates. Furthermore, FN was detected significantly more frequently in the tonsillar cores of PTA patients (56%) compared to the tonsillar cores of the controls (24%) (P = 0.001). We also analysed sera taken acutely and at least two weeks after surgery for the presence of anti-FN antibodies. We found increasing levels (at least two-fold) of anti-FN antibodies in eight of 11 FN-positive (in the tonsillar cultures) PTA patients, which was significantly more frequent compared to none of four FN-negative PTA patients and nine of 47 electively tonsillectomized controls (P = 0.026 and P < 0.001, respectively). Blood cultures obtained during acute tonsillectomy mirrored the bacterial findings in the tonsillar specimens with 22% of patients having bacteremia with FN. However, bacteremia during elective tonsillectomy was at least as prevalent as bacteremia during quinsy tonsillectomy, which challenges the distinction made by the European Society of Cardiology between quinsy and elective tonsillectomy, namely that antibiotic prophylaxis is only recommended to patients undergoing procedures to treat an established infection (i.e. PTA). Using PCR analysis for the presence of herpes simplex 1 and 2, adenovirus, influenza A and B, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and respiratory syncytial virus A and B, we explored a possible role of viruses in PTA. However, our results did not indicate that any of these viruses are involved in the development of PTA. Privious studies have documented an association between EBV and PTA in approximately 4% of PTA cases. In addition to the involvement of GAS, the following findings suggest a pathogenic role for FN in PTA: 1. Repeated high isolation rates of FN in PTA pus aspirates. 2. Higher isolation rates in PTA patients compared to electively tonsillectomised controls. 3. Development of anti-FN antibodies in FN-positive patients with PTA. 4. Significantly higher inflammatory markers in FN-positive patients compared to PTA patients infected with other bacteria. We studied the smoking habits among the same 847 PTA patients admitted to the ENT department, AUH from 2001 to 2006. We found that smoking was associated with increased risk of PTA for both genders and across all age groups. The increased risk of PTA among smokers was not related to specific bacteria. Conclusions on causality cannot be drawn from this retrospective study, but the pathophysiology behind the increased risk of PTA in smokers may be related to, previously shown, alterations in the tonsillar, bacterial flora or the local and systemical inflammatory and immunological milieu. Studying all 1,620 patients with PTA in Aarhus County from 2001 to 2006 and using population data for Aarhus County for the same six years, age- and gender-stratified mean annual incidence rates of PTA were calculated. The incidence of PTA was highly related to age and gender. The seasonal variation of PTA was insignificant. However, the microbiology of PTA fluctuated with seasons: GAS-positive PTA cases were significantly more prevalent in the winter and spring compared to the summer, while FN-positive PTA patients exhibited a more even distribution over the year, but with a trend towards higher prevalence in the summer than in the winter. In a series of 63 patients with PPA, we found that 33 (52%) patients had concomitant PTA. This association between PPA and PTA was much higher than previously documented. We therefore suggest that combined tonsillectomy and intrapharyngeal incision in cases where PTA is present or suspected. The results of our routine cultures could not support a frequent role of FN in PPA. Based on our findings suggesting that FN is a frequent pathogen in PTA, we recommend clindamycin instead of a macrolide in penicillin-allergic patients with PTA. Furthermore, cultures made from PTA aspirates should include a selective FN-agar plate in order to identify growth of this bacterium. Recent studies of sore throat patients document an association between recovery of FN and acute tonsillitis. Studying the bacterial flora of both tonsils in study II, we found almost perfect concordance between the bacterial findings of the tonsillar core at the side of the abscess and contralaterally. This finding suggests that FN is not a subsequent overgrowth phenomenon after abscess development, but that FN can act as pathogen in severe acute tonsillitis. Future studies of patients with FN-positive acute tonsillitis focusing on the optimal methods (clinical characteristics, culture, polymerase chain reaction, or other) for diagnosis and whether antibiotics (and which) can reduce symptoms and avoid complications are warranted. Until further studies are undertaken, we recommend clinicians to have increased focus on acute tonsillitis patients aged 15-24 years with regards to symptoms and findings suggestive of incipient peritonsillar involvement. We have conducted a number of studies with novel findings: 1. FN is a significant and prevalent pathogen in PTA. 2. Bacteremia during abscess tonsillectomy is no more prevalent than during elective tonsillectomy. 3. The development of anti-FN antibodies in FN-positive PTA patients. We have used novel approaches as principles to suggest pathogenic significance of candidate microorganisms: 1. Comparative microbiology between PTA patients and "normal tonsils". 2. Measurements indicating larger inflammatory response compared to clinically equivalent infection.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infecções por Fusobacterium/diagnóstico
Abscesso Peritonsilar
Infecções Estreptocócicas/diagnóstico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Abscesso/etiologia
Adolescente
Adulto
Fatores Etários
Criança
Feminino
Infecções por Fusobacterium/terapia
Fusobacterium necrophorum/isolamento & purificação
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Tonsila Palatina/anatomia & histologia
Abscesso Peritonsilar/diagnóstico
Abscesso Peritonsilar/microbiologia
Abscesso Peritonsilar/fisiopatologia
Abscesso Peritonsilar/cirurgia
Doenças Faríngeas/etiologia
Fatores de Risco
Estações do Ano
Fatores Sexuais
Fumar/efeitos adversos
Infecções Estreptocócicas/terapia
Streptococcus pyogenes/isolamento & purificação
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1703
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170313
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170313
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170307
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28257873
[Au] Autor:Karstrup CC; Pedersen HG; Jensen TK; Agerholm JS
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Large Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Dyrlægevej 68, DK-1870 Frederiksberg, Denmark.
[Ti] Título:Bacterial invasion of the uterus and oviducts in bovine pyometra.
[So] Source:Theriogenology;93:93-98, 2017 Apr 15.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3231
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Pyometra is a common disease of cattle that causes infertility and thereby financial losses to the cattle industry. Bacteria involved in the development and progression of pyometra have been investigated by microbial culture but their tissue invading abilities, which is an important aspect of bacterial pathogenicity and development of lesions, have not been investigated. Bacterial invasion of the uterus and oviducts was studied in 21 cows diagnosed with pyometra at the time of slaughter by applying fluorescence in situ hybridization using probes targeting 16S ribosomal RNA of Fusobacterium necrophorum, Porphyromonas levii, Trueperella pyogenes and the overall bacterial domain Bacteria. Fusobacterium necrophorum and P. levii were found to invade the endometrium, especially if the endometrium was ulcerated, and penetrated deep into the lamina propria. These species co-localized within the tissue thus indicating a synergism. Trueperella pyogenes did not invade the uterine tissue. In addition to endometrial lesions, most cows with pyometra also had salpingitis but without significant bacterial invasion of the oviductal wall.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Bactérias/isolamento & purificação
Doenças dos Bovinos/microbiologia
Tubas Uterinas/microbiologia
Piometra/veterinária
Útero/microbiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Actinomycetaceae/genética
Actinomycetaceae/isolamento & purificação
Animais
Bactérias/genética
Bovinos
Endométrio/microbiologia
Feminino
Fusobacterium necrophorum/genética
Fusobacterium necrophorum/isolamento & purificação
Hibridização in Situ Fluorescente/veterinária
Porphyromonas/genética
Porphyromonas/isolamento & purificação
Piometra/microbiologia
RNA Ribossômico 16S/análise
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170801
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170801
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170305
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28253398
[Au] Autor:Burgess A; Celerier C; Breton S; Van den Abbeele T; Kadlub N; Leboulanger N; Garabedian N; Couloigner V
[Ad] Endereço:Pediatric ENT Department, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.
[Ti] Título:Otogenic Temporomandibular Arthritis in Children.
[So] Source:JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg;143(5):466-471, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:2168-619X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Importance: Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (SATMJ) is a very rare but potentially severe complication of pediatric middle ear infections because it presents risks of TMJ ankylosis. Objective: To describe the clinical, radiological, biological, and microbiological characteristics and evolution of SATMJ complicating middle ear infections (otogenic SATMJ) in children. Design, Setting, and Participants: This multicenter retrospective study included all children younger than 18 years referred between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2015, for otogenic SATMJ or for TMJ ankylosis that occurred a few months to a few years after an acute mastoiditis. Nine children were included in the study. Review of the children's medical charts was conducted from February 1, 2016, to April 1, 2016. Main Outcomes and Measures: Patients' demographic characteristics and symptoms; radiological, biological, and bacteriological findings, including reanalysis of initial imaging; and treatment and outcome of SATMJ. Results: Of the 9 children, 6 were boys and 3 were girls; the mean age was 2.1 years (range, 6 months to 4.7 years). In 7 cases (78%), the primary middle ear infection was acute mastoiditis. Clinically, 5 children (55%) had preauricular swelling and only 1 (11%) had trismus. Associated thrombophlebitis of the lateral sinus or intracranial collections was present in 7 cases (78%). An initial computed tomographic scan was performed for all but 1 patient, and second-line analysis detected clear signs of TMJ inflammation in all 8 children who had a computed tomographic scan. However, SATMJ was diagnosed in only 3 cases at the time of the initial middle ear infection, leading to the recommendation of TMJ physical therapy for several months. The most frequently involved bacteria was Fusobacterium necrophorum, which was found in 4 cases. Long-term ankylosis was identified in 6 cases (67%), and 5 of these children required surgical treatment. Conclusions and Relevance: Clinicians and radiologists must thoroughly look for signs of SATMJ in children with acute mastoiditis to detect this complication, which can lead to disabling and hard-to-treat TMJ ankylosis.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Artrite Infecciosa/etiologia
Mastoidite/etiologia
Otite Média/complicações
Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular/etiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Artrite Infecciosa/diagnóstico por imagem
Artrite Infecciosa/microbiologia
Artrite Infecciosa/cirurgia
Pré-Escolar
Diagnóstico por Imagem
Progressão da Doença
Feminino
Fusobacterium necrophorum/isolamento & purificação
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Masculino
Mastoidite/diagnóstico por imagem
Mastoidite/microbiologia
Mastoidite/cirurgia
Otite Média/diagnóstico por imagem
Otite Média/microbiologia
Estudos Retrospectivos
Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular/diagnóstico por imagem
Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular/microbiologia
Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular/cirurgia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170804
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170804
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170303
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamaoto.2016.3977


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[PMID]:28122872
[Au] Autor:Van TT; Cox LM; Cox ME; Dien Bard J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA.
[Ti] Título:Prevalence of Fusobacterium necrophorum in Children Presenting with Pharyngitis.
[So] Source:J Clin Microbiol;55(4):1147-1153, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1098-660X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:, an obligate anaerobic bacterium, was recently reported to be an important cause of bacterial pharyngitis with a prevalence as high as that of group A (GAS) in adolescents and young adults. Importantly, is the primary causative agent of the life-threatening Lemierre's syndrome, and screening of pharyngeal samples may be warranted for its early detection and prevention. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalences of and groups A and C/G streptococci as agents of bacterial pharyngitis in children. Pharyngeal samples ( = 300) were collected from pediatric patients presenting to the emergency department with signs and symptoms of pharyngitis. Overall, 10 (3.3%), 79 (26.3%), and 4 (1.3%) patients were PCR positive for , GAS, and group C/G streptococci, respectively. The prevalence of was significantly higher in patients between the ages of 14 and 20 years at 13.5% than in patients aged 14 years and younger (1.9%, < 0.001). All positive patients presented with signs and symptoms similar to GAS pharyngitis. Our data demonstrated a potential role for as a pathogen of pharyngitis among young adults, but suggests that the prevalence of is low in preadolescent patients.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infecções por Fusobacterium/epidemiologia
Infecções por Fusobacterium/microbiologia
Fusobacterium necrophorum/isolamento & purificação
Faringite/epidemiologia
Faringite/microbiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Masculino
Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase
Prevalência
Estudos Prospectivos
Infecções Estreptocócicas/epidemiologia
Infecções Estreptocócicas/microbiologia
Streptococcus/classificação
Streptococcus/isolamento & purificação
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171001
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171001
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170127
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1128/JCM.02174-16


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[PMID]:28109739
[Au] Autor:Nagaoka K; Yanagihara K; Morinaga Y; Kurosaka Y; Hoshino K; Kohno S
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Laboratory Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan; Second Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan; First Department of Internal Medicine, Hokkaido University Hospital, Ho
[Ti] Título:In vivo antianaerobe activity of DS-8587, a new fluoroquinolone, against Fusobacterium necrophorum in a mouse model.
[So] Source:J Infect Chemother;23(3):131-135, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1437-7780
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:DS-8587 is a novel parenteral fluoroquinolone, which has an activity equivalent to sitafloxacin against various pathogens including anaerobes. We examined the in vivo anti-anaerobic activity of DS-8587, and compared it with that of levofloxacin (LVFX), using a murine model of Fusobacterium necrophorum-induced liver abscess developed via blood borne infection. Mice with liver abscess infection caused by F. necrophorum were treated with saline (control), DS-8587 (0.8, 4, and 20 mg/kg twice daily), or LVFX (20 and 100 mg/kg) for a day. After treatment, the number of viable bacteria in liver was analyzed. We also analyzed the pharmacokinetics of these agents in plasma and the liver after initial treatment. The MICs of DS-8587 and LVFX were 0.015 and 1 mg/mL, respectively. DS-8587 eradicated the viable bacteria in the liver even at doses as low as 4 mg/kg. In contrast, the liver bacteria were not eradicated in any of the LVFX-treated mice even at a dose of 100 mg/kg (P < 0.05 compared with DS-8587, 4 or 20 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic parameter AUC/MIC ratios for DS-8587 (4 mg/kg) and LVFX (100 mg/kg) were 96.7 and 60.8 in plasma and 600 and 145.6 in the liver, respectively. The AUC/MIC ratio showed the best correlation with efficacy of DS-8587. DS-8587 significantly reduced the number of viable bacteria in a murine model of F. necrophorum-induced liver abscess compared to LVFX. Our study demonstrated that the anti-anaerobic activity of quinolones in vivo was different from the MICs in vitro.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Bactérias Anaeróbias/efeitos dos fármacos
Fluoroquinolonas/farmacologia
Fusobacterium necrophorum/efeitos dos fármacos
Abscesso Hepático/tratamento farmacológico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Modelos Animais de Doenças
Levofloxacino/farmacologia
Fígado/microbiologia
Abscesso Hepático/microbiologia
Masculino
Camundongos
Camundongos Endogâmicos BALB C
Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana/métodos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DS-8587); 0 (Fluoroquinolones); 6GNT3Y5LMF (Levofloxacin); 9TD681796G (sitafloxacin)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170523
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170523
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170123
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28040511
[Au] Autor:Panchavati PK; Kar B; Hassoun A; Centor RM
[Ad] Endereço:Huntsville Hospital, USA.
[Ti] Título:Fusobacterium necrophorum tonsillitis with mild case of Lemierre's syndrome.
[So] Source:Anaerobe;43:102-104, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8274
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infecções por Fusobacterium/diagnóstico por imagem
Fusobacterium necrophorum/isolamento & purificação
Síndrome de Lemierre/diagnóstico por imagem
Tonsilite/diagnóstico por imagem
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Infecções por Fusobacterium/tratamento farmacológico
Infecções por Fusobacterium/microbiologia
Fusobacterium necrophorum/efeitos dos fármacos
Seres Humanos
Síndrome de Lemierre/tratamento farmacológico
Síndrome de Lemierre/microbiologia
Masculino
Tonsilite/tratamento farmacológico
Tonsilite/microbiologia
Ultrassonografia Doppler
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170515
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170515
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170102
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:27695882
[Au] Autor:Kerhuel L; Valade S; Donay JL; Canet E
[Ad] Endereço:Medical Intensive Care Unit, AP-HP, Saint Louis University Hospital, 1 avenue Claude Vellefaux, 75010, Paris, France.
[Ti] Título:Angina, back pain and septic shock.
[So] Source:Intensive Care Med;43(2):269-270, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1238
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Síndrome de Lemierre/diagnóstico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Amoxicilina/administração & dosagem
Angina Instável/etiologia
Antibacterianos/administração & dosagem
Dor nas Costas/etiologia
Fusobacterium necrophorum
Seres Humanos
Síndrome de Lemierre/complicações
Síndrome de Lemierre/tratamento farmacológico
Masculino
Metronidazol/administração & dosagem
Meia-Idade
Choque Séptico/etiologia
Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 140QMO216E (Metronidazole); 804826J2HU (Amoxicillin)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171107
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171107
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161004
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00134-016-4562-6



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