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[PMID]:28868994
[Au] Autor:Koolhof IS; Bettiol S; Carver S
[Ad] Endereço:School of Biological Sciences, University of Tasmania,Hobart, Tasmania,Australia.
[Ti] Título:Fine-temporal forecasting of outbreak probability and severity: Ross River virus in Western Australia.
[So] Source:Epidemiol Infect;145(14):2949-2960, 2017 10.
[Is] ISSN:1469-4409
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Health warnings of mosquito-borne disease risk require forecasts that are accurate at fine-temporal resolutions (weekly scales); however, most forecasting is coarse (monthly). We use environmental and Ross River virus (RRV) surveillance to predict weekly outbreak probabilities and incidence spanning tropical, semi-arid, and Mediterranean regions of Western Australia (1991-2014). Hurdle and linear models were used to predict outbreak probabilities and incidence respectively, using time-lagged environmental variables. Forecast accuracy was assessed by model fit and cross-validation. Residual RRV notification data were also examined against mitigation expenditure for one site, Mandurah 2007-2014. Models were predictive of RRV activity, except at one site (Capel). Minimum temperature was an important predictor of RRV outbreaks and incidence at all predicted sites. Precipitation was more likely to cause outbreaks and greater incidence among tropical and semi-arid sites. While variable, mitigation expenditure coincided positively with increased RRV incidence (r 2 = 0·21). Our research demonstrates capacity to accurately predict mosquito-borne disease outbreaks and incidence at fine-temporal resolutions. We apply our findings, developing a user-friendly tool enabling managers to easily adopt this research to forecast region-specific RRV outbreaks and incidence. Approaches here may be of value to fine-scale forecasting of RRV in other areas of Australia, and other mosquito-borne diseases.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infecções por Alphavirus/epidemiologia
Surtos de Doenças
Vírus do Rio Ross/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Infecções por Alphavirus/virologia
Animais
Culicidae/virologia
Previsões
Seres Humanos
Incidência
Probabilidade
Austrália Ocidental
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171125
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171125
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170905
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S095026881700190X


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[PMID]:28188934
[Au] Autor:Lau C; Aubry M; Musso D; Teissier A; Paulous S; Desprès P; de-Lamballerie X; Pastorino B; Cao-Lormeau VM; Weinstein P
[Ad] Endereço:Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, 62 Mills Rd, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, ACT 0200, Australia. Electronic address: colleen.lau@anu.edu.au.
[Ti] Título:New evidence for endemic circulation of Ross River virus in the Pacific Islands and the potential for emergence.
[So] Source:Int J Infect Dis;57:73-76, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3511
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: An epidemic of Ross River virus (RRV) occurred in the South Pacific in 1979-1980, but RRV has not been thought to occur endemically outside Australia and Papua New Guinea. A seroprevalence study was conducted to determine whether RRV has circulated in American Samoa since 1980. METHODS: RRV ELISA IgG was performed on 200 serum samples collected in American Samoa in 2010; seroneutralization tests were performed on 60 representative samples. RESULTS: Of 196 available ELISA IgG results, 145 (74%, 95% confidence interval 67-80%) were seropositive. Of the 60 samples subjected to seroneutralization testing, none of the 15 ELISA IgG-negative and 16 of the 45 ELISA IgG-positive samples neutralized RRV. ELISA IgG seroprevalence was higher in persons born before/during the 1979-1980 RRV outbreak (78.3%), but was also high (63.0%) in people born after the outbreak who had lived their entire lives in American Samoa. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides serological evidence that RRV circulation is likely to have occurred in American Samoa after 1980. Considering there are no marsupials in American Samoa, this finding implies that other species are capable of acting as reservoir hosts and indicates the potential for RRV to circulate in a much wider area than those currently recognized.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infecções por Alphavirus/epidemiologia
Vírus do Rio Ross/isolamento & purificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Animais
Anticorpos Antivirais/sangue
Surtos de Doenças
Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Imunoglobulina G/sangue
Masculino
Ilhas do Pacífico/epidemiologia
Estudos Soroepidemiológicos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antibodies, Viral); 0 (Immunoglobulin G)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170606
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170606
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170212
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:27890043
[Au] Autor:Koolhof IS; Carver S
[Ad] Endereço:School of Biological Sciences,University of Tasmania,Hobart,Tasmania,Australia.
[Ti] Título:Epidemic host community contribution to mosquito-borne disease transmission: Ross River virus.
[So] Source:Epidemiol Infect;145(4):656-666, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1469-4409
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Most vector-borne diseases infect multiple host species, but disentangling the relative importance of different host species to transmission can be complex. Here we study how host species' abundance and competence (duration and titre of parasitaemia) influence host importance during epidemic scenarios. We evaluate this theory using Ross River virus (RRV, family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus), a multi-host mosquito-borne disease with significant human health impacts across Australia and Papua New Guinea. We used host contribution models to find the importance of key hosts (possums, wallabies, kangaroos, horses, humans) in typical mammal communities around five Australian epidemic centres. We found humans and possums contributed most to epidemic RRV transmission, owing to their high abundances, generally followed by macropods. This supports humans as spillover hosts, and that human-mosquito and possum-mosquito transmission is predominant during epidemics. Sensitivity analyses indicate these findings to be robust across epidemic centres. We emphasize the importance of considering abundance and competence in identifying key hosts (during epidemics in this case), and that competence alone is inadequate. Knowledge of host importance in disease transmission may help to equip health agencies to bring about greater effectiveness of disease mitigation strategies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infecções por Alphavirus/epidemiologia
Infecções por Alphavirus/veterinária
Reservatórios de Doenças
Transmissão de Doença Infecciosa
Vetores de Doenças
Epidemias
Vírus do Rio Ross/isolamento & purificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Infecções por Alphavirus/transmissão
Animais
Animais Selvagens
Austrália/epidemiologia
Culicidae
Métodos Epidemiológicos
Seres Humanos
Modelos Estatísticos
Papua Nova Guiné/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170613
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170613
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161129
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0950268816002739


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[PMID]:27866492
[Au] Autor:Cutcher Z; Williamson E; Lynch SE; Rowe S; Clothier HJ; Firestone SM
[Ad] Endereço:Melbourne School of Population and Global Health,The University of Melbourne,Parkville,Victoria,Australia.
[Ti] Título:Predictive modelling of Ross River virus notifications in southeastern Australia.
[So] Source:Epidemiol Infect;145(3):440-450, 2017 02.
[Is] ISSN:1469-4409
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Ross River virus (RRV) is a mosquito-borne virus endemic to Australia. The disease, marked by arthritis, myalgia and rash, has a complex epidemiology involving several mosquito species and wildlife reservoirs. Outbreak years coincide with climatic conditions conducive to mosquito population growth. We developed regression models for human RRV notifications in the Mildura Local Government Area, Victoria, Australia with the objective of increasing understanding of the relationships in this complex system, providing trigger points for intervention and developing a forecast model. Surveillance, climatic, environmental and entomological data for the period July 2000-June 2011 were used for model training then forecasts were validated for July 2011-June 2015. Rainfall and vapour pressure were the key factors for forecasting RRV notifications. Validation of models showed they predicted RRV counts with an accuracy of 81%. Two major RRV mosquito vectors (Culex annulirostris and Aedes camptorhynchus) were important in the final estimation model at proximal lags. The findings of this analysis advance understanding of the drivers of RRV in temperate climatic zones and the models will inform public health agencies of periods of increased risk.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infecções por Alphavirus/epidemiologia
Clima
Culicidae/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Exposição Ambiental
Previsões
Vírus do Rio Ross/isolamento & purificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Seres Humanos
Modelos Estatísticos
Prognóstico
Vitória/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171125
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171125
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0950268816002594


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[PMID]:27402516
[Au] Autor:Inglis TJ; Bradbury RS; McInnes RL; Frances SP; Merritt AJ; Levy A; Nicholson J; Neville PJ; Lindsay M; Smith DW
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, PathWest Laboratory Medicine WA, Nedlands, Australia. School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia. 3rd Health Support Battalion, Adelaide, Australia. tim.inglis@health.wa.gov.au.
[Ti] Título:Deployable Molecular Detection of Arboviruses in the Australian Outback.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;95(3):633-8, 2016 Sep 07.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The most common causes of human infection from the arboviruses that are endemic in Australia are the arthritogenic alphaviruses: Ross River virus (RRV) and Barmah Forest virus (BFV). The most serious infections are caused by the neurotropic flaviviruses, Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV) and the Kunjin subtype of West Nile virus. The greatest individual risk of arbovirus infection occurs in tropical/subtropical northern Australia because of the warm, wet summer conditions from December to June, where conventional arbovirus surveillance is difficult due to a combination of low population density, large distances between population centers, poor roads, and seasonal flooding. Furthermore, virus detection requires samples to be sent to Perth up to 2,000 km away for definitive analysis, causing delays of days to weeks before test results are available and public health interventions can be started. We deployed a portable molecular biology laboratory for remote field detection of endemic arboviruses in northern Queensland, then in tropical Western Australia and detected BFV, MVEV, and RRV RNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays of extracts from mosquitoes trapped in Queensland. We then used a field-portable compact real-time thermocycler for the samples collected in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. Real-time field PCR assays enabled concurrent endemic arbovirus distribution mapping in outback Queensland and Western Australia. Our deployable laboratory method provides a concept of operations for future remote area arbovirus surveillance.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Arbovirus
Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Alphavirus/genética
Animais
Arbovirus/genética
Culicidae/virologia
Vírus da Encefalite do Vale de Murray/genética
Mosquitos Vetores/virologia
Vigilância da População
Queensland
Vírus do Rio Ross/genética
Vírus do Nilo Ocidental/genética
Austrália Ocidental
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170907
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170907
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160713
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.15-0878


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[PMID]:27334542
[Au] Autor:Flies EJ; Williams CR; Weinstein P; Anderson SJ
[Ad] Endereço:University of South Australia,School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences,Adelaide,SA,Australia.
[Ti] Título:Improving public health intervention for mosquito-borne disease: the value of geovisualization using source of infection and LandScan data.
[So] Source:Epidemiol Infect;144(14):3108-3119, 2016 10.
[Is] ISSN:1469-4409
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Epidemiological studies use georeferenced health data to identify disease clusters but the accuracy of this georeferencing is obfuscated by incorrectly assigning the source of infection and by aggregating case data to larger geographical areas. Often, place of residence (residence) is used as a proxy for the source of infection (source) which may not be accurate. Using a 21-year dataset from South Australia of human infections with the mosquito-borne Ross River virus, we found that 37% of cases were believed to have been acquired away from home. We constructed two risk maps using age-standardized morbidity ratios (SMRs) calculated using residence and patient-reported source. Both maps confirm significant inter-suburb variation in SMRs. Areas frequently named as the source (but not residence) and the highest-risk suburbs both tend to be tourist locations with vector mosquito habitat, and camping or outdoor recreational opportunities. We suggest the highest-risk suburbs as places to focus on for disease control measures. We also use a novel application of ambient population data (LandScan) to improve the interpretation of these risk maps and propose how this approach can aid in implementing disease abatement measures on a smaller scale than for which disease data are available.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infecções por Alphavirus/epidemiologia
Culicidae/fisiologia
Insetos Vetores/fisiologia
Saúde Pública/métodos
Vírus do Rio Ross/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Infecções por Alphavirus/virologia
Animais
Infecções por Arbovirus/epidemiologia
Infecções por Arbovirus/virologia
Arbovirus/fisiologia
Culicidae/virologia
Insetos Vetores/virologia
Saúde Pública/instrumentação
Tecnologia de Sensoriamento Remoto
Medição de Risco
Austrália do Sul/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171125
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171125
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160624
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:27222471
[Au] Autor:Ashbrook AW; Lentscher AJ; Zamora PF; Silva LA; May NA; Bauer JA; Morrison TE; Dermody TS
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA Elizabeth B. Lamb Center for Pediatric Research, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
[Ti] Título:Antagonism of the Sodium-Potassium ATPase Impairs Chikungunya Virus Infection.
[So] Source:MBio;7(3), 2016 May 24.
[Is] ISSN:2150-7511
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:UNLABELLED: Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging alphavirus that has caused epidemics of fever, arthralgia, and rash worldwide. There are currently no licensed vaccines or antiviral therapies available for the prevention or treatment of CHIKV disease. We conducted a high-throughput, chemical compound screen that identified digoxin, a cardiac glycoside that blocks the sodium-potassium ATPase, as a potent inhibitor of CHIKV infection. Treatment of human cells with digoxin or a related cardiac glycoside, ouabain, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in infection by CHIKV. Inhibition by digoxin was cell type-specific, as digoxin treatment of either murine or mosquito cells did not diminish CHIKV infection. Digoxin displayed antiviral activity against other alphaviruses, including Ross River virus and Sindbis virus, as well as mammalian reovirus and vesicular stomatitis virus. The digoxin-mediated block to CHIKV and reovirus infection occurred at one or more postentry steps, as digoxin inhibition was not bypassed by fusion of CHIKV at the plasma membrane or infection with cell surface-penetrating reovirus entry intermediates. Selection of digoxin-resistant CHIKV variants identified multiple mutations in the nonstructural proteins required for replication complex formation and synthesis of viral RNA. These data suggest a role for the sodium-potassium ATPase in promoting postentry steps of CHIKV replication and provide rationale for modulation of this pathway as a broad-spectrum antiviral strategy. IMPORTANCE: Mitigation of disease induced by globally spreading, mosquito-borne arthritogenic alphaviruses requires the development of new antiviral strategies. High-throughput screening of clinically tested compounds provides a rapid means to identify undiscovered, antiviral functions for well-characterized therapeutics and illuminate host pathways required for viral infection. Our study describes the potent inhibition of Chikungunya virus and related alphaviruses by the cardiac glycoside digoxin and demonstrates a function for the sodium-potassium ATPase in Chikungunya virus infection.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Antivirais/farmacologia
Vírus Chikungunya/efeitos dos fármacos
Vírus Chikungunya/fisiologia
ATPase Trocadora de Sódio-Potássio/antagonistas & inibidores
Replicação Viral/efeitos dos fármacos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Linhagem Celular
Febre de Chikungunya/virologia
Vírus Chikungunya/genética
Digoxina/farmacologia
Farmacorresistência Viral/genética
Inibidores Enzimáticos/farmacologia
Seres Humanos
Camundongos
Ouabaína/farmacologia
RNA Viral/efeitos dos fármacos
RNA Viral/genética
Vírus do Rio Ross/efeitos dos fármacos
Vírus Sindbis/efeitos dos fármacos
Bibliotecas de Moléculas Pequenas
Vírus/efeitos dos fármacos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antiviral Agents); 0 (Enzyme Inhibitors); 0 (RNA, Viral); 0 (Small Molecule Libraries); 5ACL011P69 (Ouabain); 73K4184T59 (Digoxin); EC 3.6.3.9 (Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170601
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170601
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160526
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:27113100
[Au] Autor:Flies EJ; Flies AS; Fricker SR; Weinstein P; Williams CR
[Ad] Endereço:University of South Australia, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, GPO Box 2471 Adelaide SA 5001, Australia (Emilyj77@gmail.com; AndyFlies@gmail.com; Stephen.Fricker@unisa.edu.au; Craig.Williams@unisa.edu.au), Emilyj77@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Regional Comparison of Mosquito Bloodmeals in South Australia: Implications for Ross River Virus Ecology.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;53(4):902-910, 2016 07.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Ross River virus (RRV) is responsible for the most notifications of human arboviral infection in Australia. Seroprevalence and experimental infection studies have implicated macropods (e.g., kangaroos) as the major reservoir hosts. However, transmission ecology varies spatially, and infections in urban areas have prompted the question of what animals serve as reservoirs in regions where macropods are scarce. In South Australia (SA), human infection rates for RRV vary greatly by region as do vector and reservoir abundance. We hypothesized that mosquito abundance and feeding patterns would vary among ecoregions of SA and could help explain divergent human case rates. To test our hypothesis, we amplified and sequenced a 457 base pair region of the cytochrome B segment of mitochondrial DNA from blood fed mosquitoes collected in three main ecoregions of SA and identified sequences using a BLAST search in NCBI. Domestic livestock made up the vast majority of bloodmeals from the region with the highest human infection rate. Livestock are generally not considered to be important reservoir hosts for RRV, but our results suggest they may have a role in transmission ecology in some places. Surprisingly, none of the 199 bloodmeal samples were identified as macropod in origin. In the context of these findings, we consider the possible RRV vectors and reservoir hosts in these regions and propose that diverse spatial and temporal transmission ecologies occur in SA, depending on vector and reservoir availability.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infecções por Alphavirus/transmissão
Culicidae/fisiologia
Insetos Vetores/fisiologia
Vírus do Rio Ross/isolamento & purificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Infecções por Alphavirus/virologia
Animais
Aves/fisiologia
Aves/virologia
Reservatórios de Doenças
Comportamento Alimentar
Seres Humanos
Mamíferos/fisiologia
Mamíferos/virologia
Densidade Demográfica
Austrália do Sul
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171120
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171120
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160427
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:27105737
[Au] Autor:Dash PK; Agarwal A; Sharma S; Saha A; Joshi G; Gopalan N; Sukumaran D; Parida MM
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Virology, Defence R and D Establishment, Jhansi Road, Gwalior 474 002, M.P., India. Electronic address: pabandash@drde.drdo.in.
[Ti] Título:Development of a SYBR green I-based quantitative RT-PCR for Ross River virus: Application in vector competence studies and antiviral drug evaluation.
[So] Source:J Virol Methods;234:107-14, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0984
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Ross River virus (RRV) is an emerging Alphavirus and is presently endemic in many parts of Oceania. Keeping in mind its emergence, we developed a molecular detection system and utilized it to study vector competence and evaluate activity of antiviral compounds against RRV. A SYBR Green I-based quantitative RT-PCR for detection of RRV was developed targeting the E2 gene, with a detection limit of 100 RNA copies/reaction. The specificity was confirmed with closely related Alphaviruses and Flaviviruses. The assay was applied to study the vector competence of Indian Aedes aegypti for RRV, which revealed 100% infection and dissemination rate with 75% transmission rate. Viral RNA was found in saliva as early as 3day post infection (dpi). Further application of the assay in antiviral drug evaluation revealed the superior in vitro activity of ribavirin compared to chloroquine in Vero cells. Successful demonstration of this assay to detect RRV in low titre mosquito samples makes it a sensitive tool in vector surveillance. This study also showed that Indian Ae. aegypti are well competent to transmit RRV highlighting the risk of its introduction to naïve territories across continents. Further validation of this assay, revealed its utility in screening of potential antivirals against RRV.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aedes/virologia
Insetos Vetores/virologia
Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real/métodos
Vírus do Rio Ross/isolamento & purificação
Vírus do Rio Ross/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Infecções por Alphavirus/diagnóstico
Infecções por Alphavirus/transmissão
Infecções por Alphavirus/virologia
Animais
Antimaláricos/farmacologia
Antivirais/isolamento & purificação
Antivirais/farmacologia
Cercopithecus aethiops
Cloroquina/farmacologia
Seres Humanos
Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana
Compostos Orgânicos
RNA Viral/genética
RNA Viral/isolamento & purificação
Ribavirina/farmacologia
Vírus do Rio Ross/efeitos dos fármacos
Vírus do Rio Ross/genética
Saliva/virologia
Células Vero
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antimalarials); 0 (Antiviral Agents); 0 (Organic Chemicals); 0 (RNA, Viral); 163795-75-3 (SYBR Green I); 49717AWG6K (Ribavirin); 886U3H6UFF (Chloroquine)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171004
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171004
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160424
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:27079828
[Au] Autor:Park SL; Huang YJ; Hsu WW; Hettenbach SM; Higgs S; Vanlandingham DL
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, United States; Biosecurity Research Institute, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, United States.
[Ti] Título:Virus-specific thermostability and heat inactivation profiles of alphaviruses.
[So] Source:J Virol Methods;234:152-5, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0984
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Serological diagnosis is a critical component for disease surveillance and is important to address the increase in incidence and disease burden of alphaviruses, such as the chikungunya (CHIKV) and Ross River (RRV) viruses. The gold standard for serological diagnosis is the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), which demonstrates the neutralizing capacity of serum samples after the removal of complement activity and adventitious viruses. This procedure is normally performed following inactivation of the virus at 56°C for 30min. Although this protocol has been widely accepted for the inactivation of envelope RNA viruses, recent studies have demonstrated that prolonged heat inactivation is required to completely inactivate two alphaviruses, Western equine encephalitis virus and CHIKV. Incomplete inactivation of viruses poses a laboratory biosafety risk and can also lead to spurious test results. Despite its importance in ensuring the safety of laboratory personnel as well as test integrity, systematic investigation on the thermostability of alphaviruses has not been performed. In this study, the temperature tolerance and heat inactivation profiles of RRV, Barmah Forest, and o'nyong-nyong viruses were determined. Variations in thermostability were observed within the Semliki forest serocomplex. Therefore, evidence-based heat inactivation procedures for alphaviruses are recommended.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Alphavirus/fisiologia
Inativação de Vírus
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Vírus Chikungunya/fisiologia
Vírus da Encefalite Equina do Oeste/fisiologia
Temperatura Alta
Testes de Neutralização
Vírus do Rio Ross/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171004
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171004
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160416
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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