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  1 / 1027 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28722584
[Au] Autor:Licona-Enriquez JD; Delgado-de la Mora J; Paddock CD; Ramirez-Rodriguez CA; Candia-Plata MDC; Hernández GÁ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Sonora, Hermosillo, Mexico.
[Ti] Título:Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Pregnancy: Four Cases from Sonora, Mexico.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;97(3):795-798, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We present a series of four pregnant women with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) that occurred in Sonora, Mexico, during 2015-2016. Confirmatory diagnoses were made by polymerase chain reaction or serological reactivity to antigens of by using an indirect immunofluorescence antibody assay. Each patient presented with fever and petechial rash and was treated successfully with doxycycline. Each of the women and one full-term infant delivered at 36 weeks gestation survived the infection. Three of the patients in their first trimester of pregnancy suffered spontaneous abortions. RMSF should be suspected in any pregnant woman presenting with fever, malaise and rash in regions where is endemic.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/epidemiologia
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Feminino
Seres Humanos
México/epidemiologia
Gravidez
Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/patologia
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/patologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171018
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171018
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170720
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.16-0917


  2 / 1027 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28598270
[Au] Autor:Trout Fryxell RT; Hendricks BM; Pompo K; Mays SE; Paulsen DJ; Operario DJ; Houston AE
[Ad] Endereço:1 Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, University of Tennessee , Knoxville, Tennessee.
[Ti] Título:Investigating the Adult Ixodid Tick Populations and Their Associated Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Rickettsia Bacteria at a Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Hotspot in Western Tennessee.
[So] Source:Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis;17(8):527-538, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1557-7759
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Ehrlichiosis and rickettsiosis are two common bacterial tick-borne diseases in the southeastern United States. Ehrlichiosis is caused by ehrlichiae transmitted by Amblyomma americanum and rickettsiosis is caused by rickettsiae transmitted by Amblyomma maculatum and Dermacentor variabilis. These ticks are common and have overlapping distributions in the region. The objective of this study was to identify Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Rickettsia species associated with questing ticks in a Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) hotspot, and identify habitats, time periods, and collection methods for collecting questing-infected ticks. Using vegetation drags and CO -baited traps, ticks were collected six times (May-September 2012) from 100 sites (upland deciduous, bottomland deciduous, grassland, and coniferous habitats) in western Tennessee. Adult collections were screened for Anaplasma and Ehrlichia (simultaneous polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) and Rickettsia using genus-specific PCRs, and resulting positive amplicons were sequenced. Anaplasma and Ehrlichia were only identified within A. americanum (Ehrlichia ewingii, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Panola Mountain Ehrlichia, and Anaplasma odocoilei sp. nov.); more Ehrlichia-infected A. americanum were collected at the end of June regardless of habitat and collection method. Rickettsia was identified in three tick species; "Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii" from A. americanum, R. parkeri and R. andeanae from A. maculatum, and R. montanensis ( = montana) from D. variabilis. Overall, significantly more Rickettsia-infected ticks were identified as A. americanum and A. maculatum compared to D. variabilis; more infected-ticks were collected from sites May-July and with dragging. In this study, we report in the Tennessee RMSF hotspot the following: (1) Anaplasma and Ehrlichia are only found in A. americanum, (2) each tick species has its own Rickettsia species, (3) a majority of questing-infected ticks are collected May-July, (4) A. americanum and A. maculatum harbor pathogenic bacteria in western Tennessee, and (5) R. rickettsii remains unidentified.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Anaplasma/isolamento & purificação
Ehrlichia/isolamento & purificação
Ixodidae/microbiologia
Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ecossistema
Seres Humanos
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/microbiologia
Estações do Ano
Tennessee/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170921
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170921
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170610
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1089/vbz.2016.2091


  3 / 1027 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28582429
[Au] Autor:Polo G; Mera Acosta C; Labruna MB; Ferreira F
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Título:Transmission dynamics and control of Rickettsia rickettsii in populations of Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris and Amblyomma sculptum.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(6):e0005613, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Brazilian Spotted Fever (BSF), caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, is the tick-borne disease that generates the largest number of human deaths in the world. In Brazil, the current increase of BSF human cases has been associated with the presence and expansion of capybaras Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, which act as primary hosts for the tick Amblyomma sculptum, vector of the R. rickettsii in this area. METHODS: We proposed a semi-discrete-time stochastic model to evaluate the role of capybaras in the transmission dynamics of R. rickettsii. Through a sensitivity analysis, we identified the parameters with significant influence on the R. rickettsii establishment. Afterward, we implemented the Gillespie's algorithm to simulate the impact of potential public health interventions to prevent BSF human cases. RESULTS: The introduction of a single infected capybara with at least one infected attached tick is enough to trigger the disease in a non-endemic area. We found that to avoid the formation of new BSF-endemic areas, it is crucial to impede the emigration of capybaras from endemic areas by reducing their birth rate by more than 58%. Model results were corroborated by ex-situ data generated from field studies, and this supports our proposal to prevent BSF human cases by implementing control strategies focused on capybaras. CONCLUSION: The proposed stochastic model illustrates how strategies for the control and prevention of vector-borne infectious diseases can be focused on amplifier hosts management practices. This work provides a basis for future prevention strategies for other neglected vector-borne diseases.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ixodidae/microbiologia
Rickettsia rickettsii/isolamento & purificação
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/veterinária
Roedores/microbiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Simulação por Computador
Modelos Biológicos
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/microbiologia
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/transmissão
Processos Estocásticos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170714
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170714
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170606
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005613


  4 / 1027 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28365226
[Au] Autor:Álvarez-Hernández G; Roldán JFG; Milan NSH; Lash RR; Behravesh CB; Paddock CD
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. Electronic address: galvarezh63@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Mexico: past, present, and future.
[So] Source:Lancet Infect Dis;17(6):e189-e196, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1474-4457
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a tick-borne zoonosis caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, is among the most lethal of all infectious diseases in the Americas. In Mexico, the disease was first described during the early 1940s by scientists who carefully documented specific environmental determinants responsible for devastating outbreaks in several communities in the states of Sinaloa, Sonora, Durango, and Coahuila. These investigators also described the pivotal roles of domesticated dogs and Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (brown dog ticks) as drivers of epidemic levels of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. After several decades of quiescence, the disease re-emerged in Sonora and Baja California during the early 21st century, driven by the same environmental circumstances that perpetuated outbreaks in Mexico during the 1940s. This Review explores the history of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Mexico, current epidemiology, and the multiple clinical, economic, and social challenges that must be considered in the control and prevention of this life-threatening illness.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Surtos de Doenças/história
Doenças do Cão/história
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/epidemiologia
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/história
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia
Cães
História do Século XX
História do Século XXI
Seres Humanos
México/epidemiologia
Rhipicephalus sanguineus/genética
Rickettsia rickettsii/isolamento & purificação
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/prevenção & controle
Infestações por Carrapato
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170627
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170627
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170403
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  5 / 1027 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28259176
[Au] Autor:Rakotonanahary RJ; Harrison A; Maina AN; Jiang J; Richards AL; Rajerison M; Telfer S
[Ad] Endereço:Plague Unit, Institut Pasteur de Madagascar, Antananarivo, Madagascar. radoupty@pasteur.mg.
[Ti] Título:Molecular and serological evidence of flea-associated typhus group and spotted fever group rickettsial infections in Madagascar.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;10(1):125, 2017 Mar 04.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Rickettsiae are obligate intracellular bacteria responsible for many febrile syndromes around the world, including in sub-Saharan Africa. Vectors of these pathogens include ticks, lice, mites and fleas. In order to assess exposure to flea-associated Rickettsia species in Madagascar, human and small mammal samples from an urban and a rural area, and their associated fleas were tested. RESULTS: Anti-typhus group (TGR)- and anti-spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR)-specific IgG were detected in 24 (39%) and 21 (34%) of 62 human serum samples, respectively, using indirect ELISAs, with six individuals seropositive for both. Only two (2%) Rattus rattus out of 86 small mammals presented antibodies against TGR. Out of 117 fleas collected from small mammals, Rickettsia typhi, a TGR, was detected in 26 Xenopsylla cheopis (24%) collected from rodents of an urban area (n = 107), while two of these urban X. cheopis (2%) were positive for Rickettsia felis, a SFGR. R. felis DNA was also detected in eight (31%) out of 26 Pulex irritans fleas. CONCLUSIONS: The general population in Madagascar are exposed to rickettsiae, and two flea-associated Rickettsia pathogens, R. typhi and R. felis, are present near or in homes. Although our results are from a single district, they demonstrate that rickettsiae should be considered as potential agents of undifferentiated fever in Madagascar.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ratos/microbiologia
Rickettsia/genética
Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/microbiologia
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/veterinária
Doenças dos Roedores/microbiologia
Sifonápteros/microbiologia
Tifo Epidêmico Transmitido por Piolhos/microbiologia
Tifo Epidêmico Transmitido por Piolhos/veterinária
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Animais
Anticorpos Antibacterianos/sangue
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Insetos Vetores/microbiologia
Madagáscar
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Filogenia
Rickettsia/classificação
Rickettsia/imunologia
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/sangue
Doenças dos Roedores/sangue
Musaranhos/microbiologia
Tifo Epidêmico Transmitido por Piolhos/sangue
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antibodies, Bacterial)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170515
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170515
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-017-2061-4


  6 / 1027 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28169507
[Au] Autor:de Oliveira SV; Willemann MCA; Gazeta GS; Angerami RN; Gurgel-Gonçalves R
[Ad] Endereço:Graduate Program in Tropical Medicine at the University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil.
[Ti] Título:Predictive Factors for Fatal Tick-Borne Spotted Fever in Brazil.
[So] Source:Zoonoses Public Health;64(7):e44-e50, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1863-2378
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In Brazil, two pathogenic Rickettsia species have been identified causing tick-borne spotted fever (SF). The aetiological agent Rickettsia rickettsii causes serious illness, particularly in the south-eastern region of the country. Moreover, the Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic Rainforest cause milder clinical manifestations in south-eastern, south and north-east regions. This study has sought to analyse predictive factors for fatal SF. A case-control study was performed using disease notification records in Brazil. The cases included were individuals with laboratory confirmation and fatal progression of SF, while the controls included individuals with SF who were cured. A total of 386 cases and 415 controls were identified (1 : 1.1), and the cases and controls were similar in age. The factors identified as being protective against death were reported presence of ticks (odds ratio [OR], 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-0.88), residing in urban areas (OR, 0.47, 95% CI, 0.31-0.74) and presenting lymphadenopathy (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.23-0.82). Males exhibited a greater chance of death (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.13-2.18), as did patients who were hospitalized (OR, 10.82; 95% CI, 6.38-18.35) and who presented hypotension or shock (OR, 10.80; 95% CI, 7.33-15.93), seizures (OR, 11.24; 95% CI, 6.49-19.45) and coma (OR of 15.16; 95% CI, 8.51-27.02). The study demonstrates the severity profile of the SF cases, defined either as the frequency of hospitalization (even in cases that were cured) or as the increased frequency of the clinical complications typically found in critical patients. Opportune clinical diagnosis, a careful evaluation of the epidemiological aspects of the disease and adequate care for patients are determining factors for reducing SF fatality rates.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Rickettsia rickettsii/patogenicidade
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/microbiologia
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/mortalidade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Brasil
Estudos de Casos e Controles
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Fatores de Risco
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/epidemiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171109
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171109
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/zph.12345


  7 / 1027 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28055518
[Au] Autor:Phillips J
[Ad] Endereço:1 University of Alabama at Birmingham.
[Ti] Título:Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.
[So] Source:Workplace Health Saf;65(1):48, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:2165-0969
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The tick-borne disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) can have deadly outcomes unless treated appropriately, yet nonspecific flu-like symptoms complicate diagnosis. Occupational health nurses must have a high index of suspicion with symptomatic workers and recognize that recent recreational or occupational activities with potential tick exposure may suggest RMSF.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Enfermagem do Trabalho/métodos
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/diagnóstico
Picadas de Carrapatos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Doença Aguda
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico
DEET/uso terapêutico
Doxiciclina/uso terapêutico
Seres Humanos
Fatores de Risco
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/tratamento farmacológico
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/epidemiologia
Picadas de Carrapatos/prevenção & controle
Picadas de Carrapatos/terapia
Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 134-62-3 (DEET); N12000U13O (Doxycycline)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170614
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170614
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170106
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/2165079916683711


  8 / 1027 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28031280
[Au] Autor:Noriea NF; Clark TR; Mead D; Hackstadt T
[Ad] Endereço:Host-Parasite Interactions Section, Laboratory of Bacteriology, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana, USA.
[Ti] Título:Proteolytic Cleavage of the Immunodominant Outer Membrane Protein rOmpA in Rickettsia rickettsii.
[So] Source:J Bacteriol;199(6), 2017 Mar 15.
[Is] ISSN:1098-5530
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, contains two immunodominant proteins, rOmpA and rOmpB, in the outer membrane. Both rOmpA and rOmpB are conserved throughout spotted fever group rickettsiae as members of a family of autotransporter proteins. Previously, it was demonstrated that rOmpB is proteolytically processed, with the cleavage site residing near the autotransporter domain at the carboxy-terminal end of the protein, cleaving the 168-kDa precursor into apparent 120-kDa and 32-kDa fragments. The 120- and 32-kDa fragments remain noncovalently associated on the surface of the bacterium, with implications that the 32-kDa fragment functions as the membrane anchor domain. Here we present evidence for a similar posttranslational processing of rOmpA. rOmpA is expressed as a predicted 224-kDa precursor yet is observed on SDS-PAGE as a 190-kDa protein. A small rOmpA fragment of ∼32 kDa was discovered during surface proteome analysis and identified as the carboxy-terminal end of the protein. A rabbit polyclonal antibody was generated to the autotransporter region of rOmpA and confirmed a 32-kDa fragment corresponding to the calculated mass of a proteolytically cleaved rOmpA autotransporter region. N-terminal amino acid sequencing revealed a cleavage site on the carboxy-terminal side of Ser-1958 in rOmpA. An avirulent strain of Iowa deficient in rOmpB processing was also defective in the processing of rOmpA. The similarities of the cleavage sites and the failure of Iowa to process either rOmpA or rOmpB suggest that a single enzyme may be responsible for both processing events. Members of the spotted fever group of rickettsiae, including , the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, express at least four autotransporter proteins that are protective antigens or putative virulence determinants. One member of this class of proteins, rOmpB, is proteolytically processed to a passenger domain and an autotransporter domain that remain associated on the rickettsial outer membrane. The protease responsible for this posttranslation processing remains unknown. Here we show that another autotransporter, rOmpA, is similarly processed by Similarities in sequence at the cleavage site and predicted secondary protein structure suggest that all four autotransporters may be processed by the same outer membrane protease.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Proteínas da Membrana Bacteriana Externa/metabolismo
Regulação Bacteriana da Expressão Gênica/fisiologia
Rickettsia rickettsii/metabolismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Sequência de Aminoácidos
Animais
Proteínas da Membrana Bacteriana Externa/genética
Feminino
Genoma Bacteriano
Cobaias
Rickettsia rickettsii/genética
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/microbiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins); 0 (rOmpA, Rickettsia)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170828
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170828
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161230
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 1027 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27880877
[Au] Autor:Scinachi CA; Takeda GA; Mucci LF; Pinter A
[Ad] Endereço:Faculdade de Saúde Pública - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; Superintendência de Controle de Endemias, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Título:Association of the occurrence of Brazilian spotted fever and Atlantic rain forest fragmentation in the São Paulo metropolitan region, Brazil.
[So] Source:Acta Trop;166:225-233, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6254
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Brazilian Spotted Fever (BSF) is a zoonotic disease caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. In the São Paulo Metropolitan Region (SPMR) it is transmitted by Amblyomma aureolatum ticks. In this region, annual lethality of the disease can reach 80% and spatial occurrence depends on environmental factors and more particularly on the presence and interaction of domestic and wild carnivores as well as the presence and characteristics of the remnant Atlantic Rain Forest patches. This study analyzed the association between forest fragmentation and its influence on the risk of occurrence of the disease in the human population. Domestic dogs tested for R. rickettsii antibodies in nine different areas under the influence of different patterns of Rain Forest fragmented landscapes and human occupancy. Landscape metrics were obtained by analyzing satellite images and high-resolution orthophotos. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to determine among the different landscape variables the one that could best explain the data variance, and the results were tested against canine seroprevalence in order to address disease occurrence risk levels. From 270 canine samples, the seroprevalence ranged from 0 to 37%. PCA showed an inverse correlation between functionally connected large forest patches and the canine seroprevalence for R. rickettsii (p=0.030; Spearman's R=-0.683), while there was a positive correlation between forest border effect and canine seroprevalence (p=0.037; Spearman's R=- 0.909). The further attributed disease occurrence risk level supported the real spatial prevalence of the disease reported for the last eight years (p=0.023; Spearman's R=0.63). The results suggest an important relation of deforestation and fragmentation with the occurrence of BSF in the SPMR.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Vetores Aracnídeos/microbiologia
Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia
Floresta Úmida
Rickettsia rickettsii/isolamento & purificação
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/veterinária
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Animais Domésticos/microbiologia
Anticorpos Antibacterianos/sangue
Brasil/epidemiologia
Doenças do Cão/microbiologia
Cães
Técnica Indireta de Fluorescência para Anticorpo
Seres Humanos
Análise de Componente Principal
Medição de Risco
Fatores de Risco
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/epidemiologia
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/microbiologia
Estudos Soroepidemiológicos
Carrapatos/microbiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antibodies, Bacterial)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1703
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170817
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170817
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161124
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  10 / 1027 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27880753
[Au] Autor:Straily A; Drexler N; Cruz-Loustaunau D; Paddock CD; Alvarez-Hernandez G
[Ti] Título:Notes from the Field: Community-Based Prevention of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever - Sonora, Mexico, 2016.
[So] Source:MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep;65(46):1302-1303, 2016 Nov 25.
[Is] ISSN:1545-861X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), a life-threatening tickborne zoonosis caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, is a reemerging disease in Mexico (1,2). R. rickettsii is an intracellular bacterium that infects vascular endothelium and can cause multisystem organ failure and death in the absence of timely administration of a tetracycline-class antibiotic, typically doxycycline. Epidemic RMSF, as described in parts of Arizona and Mexico, is associated with massive local infestations of the brown dog tick (Rhiphicephalus sanguineus sensu lato) on domestic dogs and in peridomestic settings that result in high rates of human exposure; for example, during 2003-2012, in Arizona the incidence of RMSF in the three most highly affected communities was 150 times the U.S. national average (3,4). In 2015, the Mexico Ministry of Health (MOH) declared an epidemiologic emergency because of high and sustained rates of RMSF in several states in northern Mexico, including the state of Sonora. During 2004-2015, a total of 1,129 cases and 188 RMSF deaths were reported from Sonora (Sonora MOH, unpublished data, 2016). During 2009-2015, one impoverished community (community A) in Sonora reported 56 cases of RMSF involving children and adolescents, with a case-fatality rate of 40% (Sonora MOH, unpublished data, 2016). Poverty and lack of timely access to health services are risk factors for severe RMSF. Children are especially vulnerable to infection, because they might have increased contact with dogs and spend more time playing around spaces where ticks survive (5). In Sonora, case fatality rates for children aged <10 years can be as high as 30%, which is almost four times the aggregate case-fatality rate reported for the general population of the state (8%) (2), and 10-13 times higher than the case-fatality rate described for this age group in the United States (2.4%) (6).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Serviços de Saúde Comunitária
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/prevenção & controle
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Doenças do Cão/tratamento farmacológico
Doenças do Cão/parasitologia
Cães
Seguimentos
Educação em Saúde
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Seres Humanos
México/epidemiologia
Nitrilos
Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde
Piretrinas
Rhipicephalus sanguineus/efeitos dos fármacos
Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/epidemiologia
Inquéritos e Questionários
Controle de Ácaros e Carrapatos/métodos
Infestações por Carrapato/tratamento farmacológico
Infestações por Carrapato/veterinária
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Nitriles); 0 (Pyrethrins); 2JTS8R821G (decamethrin)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1701
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170117
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170117
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161124
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.15585/mmwr.mm6546a6



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