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[PMID]:29324858
[Au] Autor:Deribe K; Beng AA; Cano J; Njouendo AJ; Fru-Cho J; Awah AR; Eyong ME; Chounna Ndongmo PW; Giorgi E; Pigott DM; Golding N; Pullan RL; Noor AM; Enquselassie F; Murray CJL; Brooker SJ; Hay SI; Enyong P; Newport MJ; Wanji S; Davey G
[Ad] Endereço:Wellcome Trust Brighton and Sussex Centre for Global Health Research, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:Mapping the geographical distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon using parasitological, serological, and clinical evidence to exclude other causes of lymphedema.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(1):e0006126, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Podoconiosis is a non-filarial elephantiasis, which causes massive swelling of the lower legs. It was identified as a neglected tropical disease by WHO in 2011. Understanding of the geographical distribution of the disease is incomplete. As part of a global mapping of podoconiosis, this study was conducted in Cameroon to map the distribution of the disease. This mapping work will help to generate data on the geographical distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon and contribute to the global atlas of podoconiosis. METHODS: We used a multi-stage sampling design with stratification of the country by environmental risk of podoconiosis. We sampled 76 villages from 40 health districts from the ten Regions of Cameroon. All individuals of 15-years old or older in the village were surveyed house-to-house and screened for lymphedema. A clinical algorithm was used to reliably diagnose podoconiosis, excluding filarial-associated lymphedema. Individuals with lymphoedema were tested for circulating Wuchereria bancrofti antigen and specific IgG4 using the Alere Filariasis Test Strips (FTS) test and the Standard Diagnostics (SD) BIOLINE lymphatic filariasis IgG4 test (Wb123) respectively, in addition to thick blood films. Presence of DNA specific to W. bancrofti was checked on night blood using a qPCR technique. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overall, 10,178 individuals from 4,603 households participated in the study. In total, 83 individuals with lymphedema were identified. Of the 83 individuals with lymphedema, two were found to be FTS positive and all were negative using the Wb123 test. No microfilaria of W. bancrofti were found in the night blood of any individual with clinical lymphedema. None were found to be positive for W. bancrofti using qPCR. Of the two FTS positive cases, one was positive for Mansonella perstans DNA, while the other harbored Loa loa microfilaria. Overall, 52 people with podoconiosis were identified after applying the clinical algorithm. The overall prevalence of podoconiosis was found to be 0.5% (95% [confidence interval] CI; 0.4-0.7). At least one case of podoconiosis was found in every region of Cameroon except the two surveyed villages in Adamawa. Of the 40 health districts surveyed, 17 districts had no cases of podoconiosis; in 15 districts, mean prevalence was between 0.2% and 1.0%; and in the remaining eight, mean prevalence was between 1.2% and 2.7%. CONCLUSIONS: Our investigation has demonstrated low prevalence but almost nationwide distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon. Designing a podoconiosis control program is a vital next step. A health system response to the burden of podoconiosis is important, through case surveillance and morbidity management services.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Anticorpos Antiprotozoários/sangue
Antígenos de Helmintos/imunologia
Elefantíase/epidemiologia
Linfedema/epidemiologia
Doenças Negligenciadas/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Anticorpos Antiprotozoários/imunologia
Camarões/epidemiologia
Elefantíase/diagnóstico
Geografia
Seres Humanos
Imunoglobulina G/sangue
Imunoglobulina G/imunologia
Linfedema/diagnóstico
Linfedema/parasitologia
Mansonella/isolamento & purificação
Doenças Negligenciadas/diagnóstico
Wuchereria bancrofti/isolamento & purificação
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antibodies, Protozoan); 0 (Antigens, Helminth); 0 (Immunoglobulin G); 0 (Wuchereria antigen)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180130
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180130
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006126


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[PMID]:28832604
[Au] Autor:Muli J; Gachohi J; Kagai J
[Ad] Endereço:School of Public Health, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya.
[Ti] Título:Soil iron and aluminium concentrations and feet hygiene as possible predictors of Podoconiosis occurrence in Kenya.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(8):e0005864, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Podoconiosis (mossy foot) is a neglected non-filarial elephantiasis considered to be caused by predisposition to cumulative contact of uncovered feet to irritative red clay soil of volcanic origins in the tropical regions. Data from structured observational studies on occurrence of Podoconiosis and related factors are not available in Kenya. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To establish the occurrence and aspects associated with Podoconiosis, a cross-sectional survey was implemented in an area located within 30 km from the foot of volcanic Mount Longonot in the Great Rift Valley in Kenya. Five villages and 385 households were selected using multistage and systematic random sampling procedures respectively during the survey. Podoconiosis was determined by triangulating (1) the clinical diagnosis, (2) molecular assaying of sputum samples to rule out Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaria and (3) determining the concentration of six elements and properties in the soil known to be associated with Podoconiosis. A structured questionnaire was used to identify possible risk factors. Univariable and multivariable Poisson regression analyses were carried out to determine factors associated with Podoconiosis. Thirteen participants were clinically positive for Podoconiosis giving an overall prevalence of 3.4%. The prevalence ranged between 0% and 18.8% across the five villages. Molecular assay for W. bancrofti test turned negative in the 13 samples. The following factors were positively associated with the Podoconiosis prevalence (P<0.1) in the univariable analyses: (i) age, (ii) gender, (iii) education level, (iv) frequency of washing legs, (v) frequency of wearing shoes, (vi) soil pH, and (vii) village. Unexpectedly, the concentration of soil minerals previously thought to be associated with Podoconiosis was found to be negatively associated with the Podoconiosis prevalence (P<0.1). In the multivariable analyses, only frequency of wearing shoes and village turned out significant (P≤0.05). By modeling the different soil mineral concentrations and pH while adjusting for the variable frequency of wearing shoes, only iron concentration was significant and in the negative dimension (P≤0.05). However, controlling for Iron, Aluminum concentrations turned significant. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study has pointed to a hitherto unreported occurrence of Podoconiosis cases and has contributed to the baseline knowledge on the occurrence of Podoconiosis in Kenya. Consistent with many studies, wearing shoes remain an important risk factor for the occurrence of the disease. However, our findings are inconsistent with some of the hitherto postulations that associate Podoconiosis prevalence with certain minerals in the soil in other regions in Africa. These findings provide new beginnings for the cross-disciplinary research of Podoconiosis in environmental health, socio-ecology and ecological niche and geo-spatial modeling and prediction.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Alumínio/análise
Elefantíase/epidemiologia
Elefantíase/etiologia

Higiene
Ferro/análise
Solo/química
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Estudos Transversais
Elefantíase/prevenção & controle
Características da Família
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Quênia/epidemiologia
Masculino
Prevalência
Fatores de Risco
Sapatos
Inquéritos e Questionários
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Soil); CPD4NFA903 (Aluminum); E1UOL152H7 (Iron)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170824
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005864


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[PMID]:28719274
[Au] Autor:Kihembo C; Masiira B; Lali WZ; Matwale GK; Matovu JKB; Kaharuza F; Ario AR; Nabukenya I; Makumbi I; Musenero M; Zhu BP; Nanyunja M
[Ad] Endereço:Epidemiology and Surveillance Division, Ministry of Health, Kampala, Uganda.
[Ti] Título:Risk Factors for Podoconiosis: Kamwenge District, Western Uganda, September 2015.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;96(6):1490-1496, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:AbstractPodoconiosis, a noninfectious elephantiasis, is a disabling neglected tropical disease. In August 2015, an elephantiasis case-cluster was reported in Kamwenge District, western Uganda. We investigated to identify the disease's nature and risk factors. We defined a suspected podoconiosis case as onset in a Kamwenge resident of bilateral asymmetrical lower limb swelling lasting ≥ 1 month, plus ≥ 1 of the following associated symptoms: skin itching, burning sensation, plantar edema, lymph ooze, prominent skin markings, rigid toes, or mossy papillomata. A probable case was a suspected case with negative microfilaria antigen immunochromatographic card test (ruling out filarial elephantiasis). We conducted active case-finding. In a case-control investigation, we tested the hypothesis that the disease was caused by prolonged foot skin exposure to irritant soils, using 40 probable case-persons and 80 asymptomatic village control-persons, individually matched by age and sex. We collected soil samples to characterize irritants. We identified 52 suspected (including 40 probable) cases with onset from 1980 to 2015. Prevalence rates increased with age; annual incidence (by reported onset of disease) was stable over time at 2.9/100,000. We found that 93% (37/40) of cases and 68% (54/80) of controls never wore shoes at work (Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio [OR ] = 7.7; 95% [confidence interval] CI = 2.0-30); 80% (32/40) of cases and 49% (39/80) of controls never wore shoes at home (OR = 5.2; 95% CI = 1.8-15); and 70% (27/39) of cases and 44% (35/79) of controls washed feet at day end (versus immediately after work) (OR = 11; 95% CI = 2.1-56). Soil samples were characterized as rich black-red volcanic clays. In conclusion, this reported elephantiasis is podoconiosis associated with prolonged foot exposure to volcanic soil. We recommended foot hygiene and universal use of protective shoes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Filariose Linfática/epidemiologia
Elefantíase/epidemiologia
Doenças Negligenciadas/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Estudos de Casos e Controles
Elefantíase/diagnóstico
Filariose Linfática/diagnóstico
Feminino
Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde
Seres Humanos
Higiene
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Doenças Negligenciadas/diagnóstico
Prevalência
Fatores de Risco
Tamanho da Amostra
Sapatos
Solo/parasitologia
Uganda/epidemiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Soil)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170719
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.16-0932


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[PMID]:28542227
[Au] Autor:Tora A; Tadele G; Aseffa A; McBride CM; Davey G
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Sociology, College of Social Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[Ti] Título:Health beliefs of school-age rural children in podoconiosis-affected families: A qualitative study in Southern Ethiopia.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(5):e0005564, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Several studies have suggested investigation of health beliefs in children to be an important pre-condition for primary prevention of disease. However, little effort has been made to understand these in the context of podoconiosis. This study therefore aimed to explore the health beliefs of school-age rural children in podoconiosis-affected families. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross sectional qualitative study was conducted in March 2016 in Wolaita Zone, Southern Ethiopia. Data were collected through in-depth individual interviews (IDIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs), with a total of one hundred seventeen 9 to15-year-old children recruited from podoconiosis affected families. The study revealed various misconceptions regarding risk factors for podoconiosis. Most children believed barefoot exposure to dew, worms, snake bite, frog urine, other forms of poison, and contact with affected people to be major causes of the disease. Their knowledge about the role of heredity and that of long term barefoot exposure to irritant mineral particles was also weak. Though most participants correctly appraised their susceptibility to podoconiosis in relation to regular use of footwear and foot hygiene, others based their risk perceptions on factors they think beyond their control. They described several barriers to preventive behaviour, including uncomfortable footwear, shortage and poor adaptability of footwear for farm activities and sports, and shortage of soap for washing. Children also perceived low self-efficacy to practice preventive behaviour in spite of the barriers. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Health education interventions may enhance school-age children's health literacy and be translated to preventive action. Overcoming practical challenges such as shortage of footwear and other hygiene facilities requires other forms of interventions such as livelihood strengthening activities. Linking podoconiosis-affected families with local governmental or non-governmental organizations providing socio-economic support for households may assist school-age children in those families to sustainably engage in preventive behaviours.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Elefantíase/prevenção & controle
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Higiene/normas
Sapatos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Criança
Estudos Transversais
Etiópia
Feminino
Grupos Focais
Educação em Saúde
Seres Humanos
Higiene/educação
Masculino
Pesquisa Qualitativa
Fatores de Risco
População Rural
Inquéritos e Questionários
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170720
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170720
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170526
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005564


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[PMID]:28493920
[Au] Autor:Le Blond JS; Baxter PJ; Bello D; Raftis J; Molla YB; Cuadros J; Davey G
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Earth Sciences, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:Haemolytic activity of soil from areas of varying podoconiosis endemicity in Ethiopia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(5):e0177219, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Podoconiosis, non-filarial elephantiasis, is a non-infectious disease found in tropical regions such as Ethiopia, localized in highland areas with volcanic soils cultivated by barefoot subsistence farmers. It is thought that soil particles can pass through the soles of the feet and taken up by the lymphatic system, leading to the characteristic chronic oedema of the lower legs that becomes disfiguring and disabling over time. METHODS: The close association of the disease with volcanic soils led us to investigate the characteristics of soil samples in an endemic area in Ethiopia to identify the potential causal constituents. We used the in vitro haemolysis assay and compared haemolytic activity (HA) with soil samples collected in a non-endemic region of the same area in Ethiopia. We included soil samples that had been previously characterized, in addition we present other data describing the characteristics of the soil and include pure phase mineral standards as comparisons. RESULTS: The bulk chemical composition of the soils were statistically significantly different between the podoconiosis-endemic and non-endemic areas, with the exception of CaO and Cr. Likewise, the soil mineralogy was statistically significant for iron oxide, feldspars, mica and chlorite. Smectite and kaolinite clays were widely present and elicited a strong HA, as did quartz, in comparison to other mineral phases tested, although no strong difference was found in HA between soils from the two areas. The relationship was further investigated with principle component analysis (PCA), which showed that a combination of an increase in Y, Zr and Al2O3, and a concurrent increase Fe2O3, TiO2, MnO and Ba in the soils increased HA. CONCLUSION: The mineralogy and chemistry of the soils influenced the HA, although the interplay between the components is complex. Further research should consider the variable biopersistance, hygroscopicity and hardness of the minerals and further characterize the nano-scale particles.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Elefantíase/epidemiologia
Elefantíase/patologia
Hemólise
Solo/química
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Bário/análise
Compostos de Cálcio/análise
Cromo/análise
Etiópia
Compostos Férricos/análise
Seres Humanos
Compostos de Manganês/análise
Microscopia Eletrônica de Transmissão
Minerais/análise
Óxidos/análise
Análise de Componente Principal
Titânio/análise
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Calcium Compounds); 0 (Ferric Compounds); 0 (Manganese Compounds); 0 (Minerals); 0 (Oxides); 0 (Soil); 0R0008Q3JB (Chromium); 15FIX9V2JP (titanium dioxide); 24GP945V5T (Barium); 64J2OA7MH3 (manganese oxide); C7X2M0VVNH (lime); D1JT611TNE (Titanium)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170512
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0177219


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[PMID]:28426009
[Au] Autor:Maxmen A
[Ti] Título:Global coalition chips away at neglected tropical diseases.
[So] Source:Nature;544(7650):281-282, 2017 04 18.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4687
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Saúde Global
Cooperação Internacional
Doenças Negligenciadas/prevenção & controle
Doenças Negligenciadas/terapia
Medicina Tropical/organização & administração
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Pesquisa Biomédica/economia
Pesquisa Biomédica/organização & administração
Elefantíase/epidemiologia
Elefantíase/prevenção & controle
Saúde Global/economia
Seres Humanos
Doenças Negligenciadas/economia
Doenças Negligenciadas/epidemiologia
Prevalência
Parcerias Público-Privadas/economia
Parcerias Público-Privadas/organização & administração
Tanzânia/epidemiologia
Medicina Tropical/economia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:NEWS
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170822
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170822
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170421
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/544281a


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[PMID]:28187129
[Au] Autor:Burn H; Aweke S; Wondie T; Habtamu E; Deribe K; Rajak S; Bremner S; Davey G
[Ad] Endereço:Wellcome Trust Brighton and Sussex Centre for Global Health Research, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:Podoconiosis, trachomatous trichiasis and cataract in northern Ethiopia: A comparative cross sectional study.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(2):e0005388, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Rural populations in low-income countries commonly suffer from the co-morbidity of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Podoconiosis, trachomatous trichiasis (both NTDs) and cataract are common causes of morbidity among subsistence farmers in the highlands of northern Ethiopia. We explored whether podoconiosis was associated with cataract or trachomatous trichiasis (TT) among this population. METHODS: A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in East Gojam region, Amhara, Ethiopia in May 2016. Data were collected from patients previously identified as having podoconiosis and from matched healthy neighbourhood controls. Information on socio-demographic factors, clinical factors and past medical history were collected by an interview-administered questionnaire. Clinical examination involved grading of podoconiosis by examination of both legs, measurement of visual acuity, direct ophthalmoscopy of dilated pupils to grade cataract, and eyelid and corneal examination to grade trachoma. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to estimate independent association and correlates of podoconiosis, TT and cataract. FINDINGS: A total of 700 participants were included in this study; 350 podoconiosis patients and 350 healthy neighbourhood controls. The prevalence of TT was higher among podoconiosis patients than controls (65 (18.6%) vs 43 (12.3%)) with an adjusted odds ratio OR 1.57 (95% CI 1.02-2.40), p = 0.04. There was no significant difference in prevalence of cataract between the two populations with an adjusted OR 0.83 (95% CI 0.55-1.25), p = 0.36. Mean best visual acuity was 0.59 (SD 0.06) in podoconiosis cases compared to 0.44 (SD 0.04) in controls, p<0.001. The proportion of patients classified as blind was higher in podoconiosis cases compared with healthy controls; 5.6% vs 2.0%; adjusted OR 2.63 (1.08-6.39), P = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with podoconiosis have a higher burden of TT and worse visual acuity than their matched healthy neighbourhood controls. Further research into the environmental and biological reasons for this co-morbidity is required. A shared approach to managing these two NTDs within the same population could be beneficial.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Catarata/epidemiologia
Elefantíase/epidemiologia
Tracoma/epidemiologia
Triquíase/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Estudos Transversais
Etiópia/epidemiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170922
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170922
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170211
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005388


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[PMID]:27650390
[Au] Autor:Wanji S; Kengne-Ouafo JA; Datchoua-Poutcheu FR; Njouendou AJ; Tayong DB; Sofeu-Feugaing DD; Amvongo-Adjia N; Fovennso BA; Longang-Tchounkeu YF; Tekola-Ayele F; Enyong PA; Newport MJ; Davey G
[Ad] Endereço:Parasites and Vector Biology research unit (PAVBRU), Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon. swanji@yahoo.fr.
[Ti] Título:Detecting and staging podoconiosis cases in North West Cameroon: positive predictive value of clinical screening of patients by community health workers and researchers.
[So] Source:BMC Public Health;16:997, 2016 Sep 20.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2458
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The suitability of using clinical assessment to identify patients with podoconiosis in endemic communities has previously been demonstrated. In this study, we explored the feasibility and accuracy of using Community Health Implementers (CHIs) for the large scale clinical screening of the population for podoconiosis in North-west Cameroon. METHODS: Before a regional podoconiosis mapping, 193 CHIs and 50 health personnel selected from 6 health districts were trained in the clinical diagnosis of the disease. After training, CHIs undertook community screening for podoconiosis patients under health personnel supervision. Identified cases were later re-examined by a research team with experience in the clinical identification of podoconiosis. RESULTS: Cases were identified by CHIs with an overall positive predictive value (PPV) of 48.5% [34.1-70%]. They were more accurate in detecting advanced stages of the disease compared to early stages; OR 2.07, 95% CI = 1.15-3.73, p = 0.015 for all advanced stages). Accuracy of detecting cases showed statistically significant differences among health districts (χ2 = 25.30, p = 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Podoconiosis being a stigmatized disease, the use of CHIs who are familiar to the community appears appropriate for identifying cases through clinical diagnosis. However, to improve their effectiveness and accuracy, more training, supervision and support are required. More emphasis must be given in identifying early clinical stages and in health districts with relatively lower PPVs.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Agentes Comunitários de Saúde
Elefantíase/diagnóstico
Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde
Área Carente de Assistência Médica
Pesquisadores
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Camarões/epidemiologia
Elefantíase/epidemiologia
Elefantíase/patologia
Elefantíase/prevenção & controle
Estudos de Viabilidade
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Programas de Rastreamento/métodos
População Rural
Índice de Gravidade de Doença
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170922
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170922
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160922
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12889-016-3669-6


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[PMID]:27620919
[Au] Autor:Tsegay G; Tamiru A; Amberbir T; Davey G; Deribe K
[Ad] Endereço:School of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Debre Markos University, P.O. Box 269, Debre Markos, Ethiopia girmshe@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Willingness to pay for footwear, and associated factors related to podoconiosis in northern Ethiopia.
[So] Source:Int Health;8(5):345-53, 2016 09.
[Is] ISSN:1876-3405
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: In Northern Ethiopia, use of footwear by the rural community is limited, and non-governmental organizations provide footwear for school children as a means of preventing podoconiosis. However, this is not a sustainable strategy. This study assessed willingness to pay for footwear among people with and without podoconiosis. METHODS: A comparative cross-sectional community-based study was conducted in Mecha and Gozamen woredas among randomly selected people with and without podoconiosis. Trained health extension workers collected data using an interviewer-administered structured questionnaire. The data were entered into EPI-Data and exported to SPSS version 16.0 statistical software package for analysis. RESULTS: The willingness to pay for footwear among people with and without podoconiosis was 72.3% and 76.7% respectively (p=0.30). People with podoconiosis in the lower quintiles of economic status were less likely to be willing to pay for footwear than those in the higher quintiles. CONCLUSIONS: There is substantial willingness to pay for footwear. The expressed willingness to pay indicates demand for footwear in the community, suggesting an opportunity for shoe companies. There are still a substantial proportion of individuals not willing to pay for footwear. This requires intensified public education and social transformation to bring about change in behavior towards footwear use if elimination of podoconiosis within our generation is to be achieved.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atitude Frente à Saúde
Elefantíase/economia
Elefantíase/prevenção & controle
Gastos em Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos
População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos
Sapatos/economia
População Urbana/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Estudos Transversais
Etiópia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Inquéritos e Questionários
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171120
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171120
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160914
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/inthealth/ihw033


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[PMID]:27536772
[Au] Autor:Banks HS; Tsegay G; Wubie M; Tamiru A; Davey G; Cooper M
[Ad] Endereço:Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:Using Qualitative Methods to Explore Lay Explanatory Models, Health-Seeking Behaviours and Self-Care Practices of Podoconiosis Patients in North-West Ethiopia.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;10(8):e0004878, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Podoconiosis (endemic non-filarial elephantiasis) is a chronic, non-infectious disease resulting from exposure of bare feet to red-clay soil in tropical highlands. This study examined lay beliefs about three under-researched aspects of podoconiosis patients' care: explanatory models, health-seeking behaviours and self-care. METHODS: In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were undertaken with 34 participants (19 male, 15 female) between April-May 2015 at podoconiosis treatment centres across East and West Gojjam regions in north-west Ethiopia. RESULTS: Explanatory models for podoconiosis included contamination from blood, magic, soil or affected individuals. Belief in heredity or divine punishment often delayed clinic attendance. All participants had tried holy water treatment and some, holy soil. Herbal treatments were considered ineffectual, costly and appeared to promote fluid escape. Motivators for clinic attendance were failure of traditional treatments and severe or disabling symptoms. Patients did not report self-treatment with antibiotics. Self-care was hindered by water being unavailable or expensive and patient fatigue. CONCLUSION: A pluralistic approach to podoconiosis self-treatment was discovered. Holy water is widely valued, though some patients prefer holy soil. Priests and traditional healers could help promote self-care and "signpost" patients to clinics. Change in behaviour and improving water access is key to self-care.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Elefantíase/etiologia
Elefantíase/terapia
Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Autocuidado
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Terapias Complementares
Cultura
Etiópia/epidemiologia
Feminino
Grupos Focais
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Medicina Tradicional
Meia-Idade
Pesquisa Qualitativa
População Rural
Solo
Terapias Espirituais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Soil)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160819
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0004878



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