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[PMID]:27288756
[Au] Autor:González JA; Amich F; Postigo-Mota S; Vallejo JR
[Ad] Endereço:Grupo de Investigación de Recursos Etnobiológicos del Duero-Douro (GRIRED), Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca E-37071, Spain. Electronic address: ja.gonzalez@usal.es.
[Ti] Título:The use of wild vertebrates in contemporary Spanish ethnoveterinary medicine.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;191:135-151, 2016 Sep 15.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] País de publicação:Ireland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: This review documents the wide and varied repertoire of traditional practices based on the use of wild vertebrates in Spanish ethnoveterinary medicine (EVM) from the early 20th century to the present. Empirical practices, both ritual and magical, are recorded, and these EVM data are compared with those of other countries in the Mediterranean Region and Latin America. The data collected here could form a scientific foundation for future inventories of traditional knowledge and help in the discovery of new drugs for livestock. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A qualitative systematic review of international and national databases in the fields of ethnobiology, ethnoveterinary medicine, folklore and ethnography was made. Information was obtained from more than 60 documentary sources. RESULTS: We recorded the use of 30 wild vertebrates and a total of 84 empirical remedies based on the use of a single species. The two most relevant zoological groups are reptiles and mammals. A wide diversity of body parts or products have been and are used. The meat and skin of snakes are the animal products most commonly used. These zootherapeutic resources have been and are used to treat or prevent ca. 50 animal diseases or conditions, in particular digestive and reproductive ailments, together with some infectious diseases. Sheep, cattle and equines form the group of domestic animals in which the greatest number of useful species are employed. In addition, many remedies and practices of the magical type are documented. In comparison with other culturally related areas, this is a rich heritage. CONCLUSIONS: Contemporary Spanish EVM practices amass a great richness of wild animal-based remedies. A diversity of animal parts or products have been used, offering a cultural heritage that could be a fundamental step in the discovery of new and low-cost drugs for treating livestock and alternative materials for pharmaceutical purposes. This overview contributes to the inventory of some uses and rituals seriously threatened by the progressive loss of local veterinary knowledge.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Animais Selvagens/classificação
Etnofarmacologia
Gado
Medicina Tradicional
Organoterapia
Medicina Veterinária
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Ritualístico
Comparação Transcultural
Características Culturais
Espécies em Perigo de Extinção
Seres Humanos
Organoterapia/efeitos adversos
Espanha
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170808
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170808
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160612
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:26815801
[Au] Autor:Hayes EH
[Ti] Título:Consumption of the Placenta in the Postpartum Period.
[So] Source:J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs;45(1):78-89, 2016 Jan-Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1552-6909
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Postpartum women are consuming their placentas to achieve claimed health benefits, including improved mood, energy, and lactation. Strong scientific evidence to substantiate these claims is lacking. Self-reported benefits from some women include improved mood and lactation; animal models suggest there may be an analgesic effect. Possible risks include infection, thromboembolism from estrogens in placental tissue, and accumulation of environmental toxins. Women's health care providers should be aware of this practice to help women make informed decisions.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ingestão de Alimentos
Organoterapia
Placenta/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Suplementos Nutricionais/efeitos adversos
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Comportamento Materno
Organoterapia/efeitos adversos
Organoterapia/métodos
Organoterapia/psicologia
Período Pós-Parto/psicologia
Gravidez
Medição de Risco
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1610
[Cu] Atualização por classe:161230
[Lr] Data última revisão:
161230
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160128
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:26775311
[Au] Autor:Hakimi R
[Ti] Título:[Extensive epidural and intraarticular injection- and infiltration treatment with homeopathic and organotherapeutic-preparations. Is such treatment for pain medically necessary?].
[Ti] Título:Umfangreiche epidurale und intraartikuläre Injektions- und Infiltrationsbehandlung mit homöopathischen und organotherapeutischen Präparaten. Ist eine solche Behandlung zur Schmerztherapie medizinisch notwendig?.
[So] Source:Versicherungsmedizin;67(4):201-2, 2015 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:0933-4548
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:ger
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dor Crônica/tratamento farmacológico
Homeopatia/métodos
Organoterapia/métodos
Extratos Vegetais/uso terapêutico
Procedimentos Desnecessários
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Anestesia Local/métodos
Medicina Baseada em Evidências
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Injeções Epidurais/métodos
Injeções Intra-Articulares
Meia-Idade
Resultado do Tratamento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Plant Extracts)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1602
[Cu] Atualização por classe:161021
[Lr] Data última revisão:
161021
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160119
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:25947365
[Au] Autor:Vats R; Thomas S
[Ad] Endereço:School of Biological Sciences, College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, the University of Dodoma, Dodoma, Tanzania. Vatsr71@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:A study on use of animals as traditional medicine by Sukuma Tribe of Busega District in North-western Tanzania.
[So] Source:J Ethnobiol Ethnomed;11:38, 2015 May 07.
[Is] ISSN:1746-4269
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Faunal resources have played an extensive range of roles in human life from the initial days of recorded history. In addition to their importance, animals have been acknowledged in religion, art, music and literature and several other different cultural manifestations of mankind. Human beings are acquainted with use of animals for foodstuff, cloth, medicine, etc. since ancient times. Huge work has been carried out on ethnobotany and traditional medicine. Animal and their products are also holding medicinal properties that can be exploited for the benefit of human beings like plants. In Tanzania, many tribal communities are spread all over the country and these people are still totally depended on local customary medicinal system for their health care. In the world Tanzania is gifted with wide range of floral and faunal biodiversity. The use of traditional medicine from animals by Sukuma ethnic group of Busega district is the aim of the present study. METHOD: In order to collect the information on ethnozoological use about animal and their products predominant among this tribe in Busega district, a study was carried out from August 2012, to July 2013. Data were collected through semi-structured questionnaire and open interview with 180 (118 male and 62 females) selected people. The people from whom the data were collected comprise old age community members, traditional health practicener, fishermen and cultural officers. The name of animal and other ethnozoological information were documented. Pictures and discussion were also recorded with the help of camera and voice recorder. RESULT: A total of 42 various animal species were used in nearly 30 different medicinal purposes including STD, stoppage of bleeding, reproductive disorders, asthma, weakness, tuberculosis, cough, paralysis and wound and for other religious beliefs. It has been noticed that animal used by Sukuma tribe, comprise of seventeen mammals, seven birds, four reptiles, eight arthropods and two mollusks. Some of the protected species were also used as important medicinal resources. We also found that cough, tuberculosis, asthma and other respiratory diseases are the utmost cited disease, as such, a number of traditional medicines are available for the treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The present work indicates that 42 animal species were being used to treat nearly 30 different ailments and results show that ethnozoological practices are an important alternative medicinal practice by the Sukuma tribe living in Bungesa district. The present study also indicates the very rich ethnozoological knowledge of these people in relation to traditional medicine. So there is a critical need to properly document to keep a record of the ethnozoological information. We hope that the information generated in this study will be useful for further research in the field of ethnozoology, ethnopharmacology and conservation approach.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Animais Selvagens
Medicina Tradicional/métodos
Organoterapia/métodos
Grupos Populacionais
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Animais
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Países em Desenvolvimento
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Entrevistas como Assunto
Masculino
Tanzânia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1609
[Cu] Atualização por classe:150620
[Lr] Data última revisão:
150620
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:150508
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13002-015-0001-y


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[PMID]:25608977
[Au] Autor:Hernandez J; Campos CM; Borghi CE
[Ad] Endereço:Interacciones Biológicas del Desierto (INTERBIODES-CIGEOBIO [Centro de Investigaciones de la Geósfera y la Biósfera, CONICET-UNSJ). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Av. Ignacio de la Roza 590 (Oeste), J5402DCS, Rivadavia, San Juan, Argentina. jorge
[Ti] Título:Medicinal use of wild fauna by mestizo communities living near San Guillermo Biosphere Reserve (San Juan, Argentina).
[So] Source:J Ethnobiol Ethnomed;11:15, 2015 Jan 21.
[Is] ISSN:1746-4269
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Wild and domestic animals and their by-products are important ingredients in the preparation of curative, protective and preventive medicines. Despite the medicinal use of animals worldwide, this topic has received less attention than the use of medicinal plants. This study assessed the medicinal use of animals by mestizo communities living near San Guillermo MaB Reserve by addressing the following questions: What animal species and body parts are used? What ailments or diseases are treated with remedies from these species? To what extent do mestizo people use animals as a source of medicine? Is the use related to people's age? METHODS: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 171 inhabitants (15-93 years old) of four villages close to the Reserve: Tudcúm, Angualasto, Malimán and Colangüil. We calculated the informant consensus factor and fidelity level to test homogeneity of knowledge and to know the importance of different medicinal uses for a given species. RESULTS: The medicinal use of animals was reported by 57% of the surveyed people. Seven species were mentioned: Rhea pennata, Lama guanicoe, Puma concolor, Pseudalopex sp., Lama vicugna, Lepus europaeus and Conepatus chinga. Several body parts were used: fat, leg, bezoar-stone, stomach, feather, meat, blood, feces, wool, and liver. The fat of R. pennata was the most frequently used animal part, followed by the bezoar stone and the leg of L. guanicoe. Animals were used to treat 22 ailments, with respiratory and nervous system disorders being the most frequently treated diseases with a high degree of consensus. Old people used animals as remedies more frequently than young residents, showing some differences among villages. CONCLUSIONS: A low number of animal species was mentioned as used for medicinal purposes, which could be explained by the perception of strong control related the legislation that bans hunting and the erosion of traditional knowledge produced by mestizaje. However, the presence of a traditional medicine is deeply rooted in the community culture. Management strategy for protected areas should focus not only on the conservation and sustainability of biological resources, but also on the ancestral knowledge of local communities, such as the medicinal use of animals.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Medicina Tradicional/métodos
Organoterapia/métodos
Grupos Populacionais/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Animais
Animais Selvagens
Argentina
Características Culturais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Entrevistas como Assunto
Bases de Conhecimento
Masculino
Meia-Idade
População Rural
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1609
[Cu] Atualização por classe:150718
[Lr] Data última revisão:
150718
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:150123
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/1746-4269-11-15


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[PMID]:25412571
[Au] Autor:Boakye MK; Pietersen DW; Kotzé A; Dalton DL; Jansen R
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Tshwane University of Technology, P/Bag X680, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. maxwell_boakye@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Título:Ethnomedicinal use of African pangolins by traditional medical practitioners in Sierra Leone.
[So] Source:J Ethnobiol Ethnomed;10:76, 2014 Nov 20.
[Is] ISSN:1746-4269
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Pangolins (Manidae) have long been used for traditional medicinal purposes in most parts of sub-Saharan Africa. However, very little is known about the extent of this use, the body parts that are used and the ailments these practices are attempting to cure or alleviate. Pangolin body parts are used extensively and frequently by traditional medical practitioners in Sierra Leone. METHODS: A total of 63 traditional medical practitioners consented and were interviewed using semi-structured questionnaires on the traditional medicinal use of pangolin body parts. The use value, informant agreement ratio and use agreement value for each pangolin part was calculated to ascertain the most sought after body part, the level of knowledge dissemination among traditional medical practitioners about body parts and the most culturally significant body part. RESULTS: It was found that 22 pangolin parts are used to treat various ailments and conditions under 17 international categories of diseases. The highest use value was recorded for scales while eyes had the highest level of consensus among the traditional medical practitioners. The highest use value and informant agreement ratio for scales were recorded for spiritual ailments. Scales were the most culturally significant body part according to the use agreement value. CONCLUSION: This study indicates a high importance value for pangolins as part of these communities' spiritual, cultural and medicinal beliefs. However, the numbers of individuals harvested from the wild remains unknown and unregulated even though pangolins have been listed under Schedule 2 of the Wildlife Conservation Act, 1972, of Sierra Leone, which prohibits any person from hunting or being in possession of pangolins. It is likely that this unregulated harvesting and poaching of this threatened species, for medicinal purposes, is unsustainable and there is an urgent need to determine pangolin population abundance within this region to ensure their sustainable harvesting for cultural use and conservation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Mamíferos
Medicina Tradicional Africana
Organoterapia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Animais
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Serra Leoa
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1507
[Cu] Atualização por classe:151028
[Lr] Data última revisão:
151028
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:141122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/1746-4269-10-76


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[PMID]:25110425
[Au] Autor:Wang DQ; Carey MC
[Ad] Endereço:David Q-H Wang, Martin C Carey, Gastroenterology Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Digestive Diseases Center, Boston, MA 02115, United States.
[Ti] Título:Therapeutic uses of animal biles in traditional Chinese medicine: an ethnopharmacological, biophysical chemical and medicinal review.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;20(29):9952-75, 2014 Aug 07.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Forty-four different animal biles obtained from both invertebrates and vertebrates (including human bile) have been used for centuries for a host of maladies in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) beginning with dog, ox and common carp biles approximately in the Zhou dynasty (c. 1046-256 BCE). Overall, different animal biles were prescribed principally for the treatment of liver, biliary, skin (including burns), gynecological and heart diseases, as well as diseases of the eyes, ears, nose, mouth and throat. We present an informed opinion of the clinical efficacy of the medicinal uses of the different animal biles based on their presently known principal chemical components which are mostly steroidal detergent-like molecules and the membrane lipids such as unesterified cholesterol and mixed phosphatidylcholines and sometimes sphingomyelin, as well as containing lipopigments derived from heme principally bilirubin glucuronides. All of the available information on the ethnopharmacological uses of biles in TCM were collated from the rich collection of ancient Chinese books on materia medica held in libraries in China and United States and the composition of various animal biles was based on rigorous separatory and advanced chemical identification techniques published since the mid-20(th) century collected via library (Harvard's Countway Library) and electronic searches (PubMed and Google Scholar). Our analysis of ethnomedical data and information on biliary chemistry shows that specific bile salts, as well as the common bile pigment bilirubin and its glucuronides plus the minor components of bile such as vitamins A, D, E, K, as well as melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) are salutary in improving liver function, dissolving gallstones, inhibiting bacterial and viral multiplication, promoting cardiac chronotropsim, as well as exhibiting anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic, anti-oxidant, sedative, anti-convulsive, anti-allergic, anti-congestive, anti-diabetic and anti-spasmodic effects. Pig, wild boar and human biles diluted with alcohol were shown to form an artificial skin for burns and wounds one thousand years ago in the Tang dynasty (618-907 CE). Although various animal biles exhibit several generic effects in common, a number of biles appear to be advantageous for specific therapeutic indications. We attempt to understand these effects based on the pharmacology of individual components of bile as well as attempting to identify a variety of future research needs.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Bile
Etnofarmacologia
Materia Medica/uso terapêutico
Medicina Tradicional Chinesa/métodos
Organoterapia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Bile/química
China
Etnofarmacologia/história
História do Século XIX
História do Século XX
História do Século XXI
História Antiga
Seres Humanos
Materia Medica/história
Medicina Tradicional Chinesa/história
Organoterapia/história
Resultado do Tratamento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; REVIEW
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Materia Medica)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1505
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:140812
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v20.i29.9952


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[PMID]:24797662
[Au] Autor:Lee H; Park Y; Ahn CW; Park SH; Jung EY; Suh HJ
[Ad] Endereço:1 Department of Food & Nutrition, Korea University , Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Título:Deer bone extract suppresses articular cartilage damage induced by monosodium iodoacetate in osteoarthritic rats: an in vivo micro-computed tomography study.
[So] Source:J Med Food;17(6):701-6, 2014 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1557-7600
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We evaluated the anti-osteoarthritic effects of deer bone extract on articular cartilage damage by using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) in monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis (OA) in rats. Male Wistar rats (6 weeks of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups (10 rats/group): sham control (SC; PBS injection+PBS 1 mL treatment); negative control (NC; MIA injection+PBS 1 mL treatment); positive control (PC; MIA injection+250 mg/kg glucosamine sulfate/chondroitin sulfate mixture treatment); low dose (LDB; MIA injection+250 mg/kg deer bone extract treatment); and high dose (HDB; MIA injection+500 mg/kg deer bone extract treatment). After 50 days of treatment, we observed that the administration of deer bone extract protected against bone destruction and reduced the number of erosion lacunae. When deer bone extract was administered, the trabecular thickness distribution (Tb.Th) (LDB: 75.9 µm, HDB: 80.7 µm vs. NC: 48.0 µm) and the trabecular bone volume fraction ratio (BV/TV) (LDB: 43.8%, HDB: 48.2% vs. NC: 39.1%) were significantly restored. Additionally, the trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) increase caused by MIA was decreased significantly with the administration of deer bone extract (LDB: 73.4 µm, HDB: 81.2 µm vs. NC: 112.0 µm). We concluded that the oral administration of deer bone extract effectively relieved the morphological changes induced by MIA injection in an animal model.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Artrite Experimental/tratamento farmacológico
Produtos Biológicos/uso terapêutico
Osso e Ossos/efeitos dos fármacos
Cartilagem Articular/efeitos dos fármacos
Cervos
Organoterapia
Osteoartrite/tratamento farmacológico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Artrite Experimental/patologia
Produtos Biológicos/farmacologia
Doenças Ósseas/induzido quimicamente
Doenças Ósseas/prevenção & controle
Osso e Ossos/patologia
Modelos Animais de Doenças
Injeções
Iodoacetatos
Masculino
Osteoartrite/induzido quimicamente
Osteoartrite/patologia
Distribuição Aleatória
Ratos Wistar
Microtomografia por Raio-X/métodos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Biological Products); 0 (Iodoacetates)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1501
[Cu] Atualização por classe:140613
[Lr] Data última revisão:
140613
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:140507
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1089/jmf.2013.2959


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[PMID]:24680989
[Au] Autor:Chellappandian M; Pandikumar P; Mutheeswaran S; Gabriel Paulraj M; Prabakaran S; Duraipandiyan V; Ignacimuthu S; Al-Dhabi NA
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Ethnopharmacology, Entomology Research Institute, Loyola College, Nungambakkam, Chennai 600 034, Tamil Nadu, India.
[Ti] Título:Documentation and quantitative analysis of local ethnozoological knowledge among traditional healers of Theni district, Tamil Nadu, India.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;154(1):116-30, 2014 May 28.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] País de publicação:Ireland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: This study investigated the use of animals among the traditional healers in Theni district of Tamil Nadu, India. The data regarding the medicinal animals/animal products were documented and their usages were analyzed quantitatively. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Based on free list interviews with the traditional healers, we documented the medicinal usage of animals/animal products and calculated the indices such as informant consensus factor (Fic) to determine the consensus over the species for an illness category, as well as the Index Agreement on Remedies (IAR) to determine the extent of potential utilization of each species. RESULTS: In this study, 69 medicinal animals/animal products were documented with the help of standardized questionnaires among the local healers. The results were tabulated and Fic value for each illness category was calculated. Three illness categories viz., jaundice (milk of Capra aegagrus hircus), orthopedics (egg white and meat of Gallus gallus domesticus) and pediatrics (milk of Equus africanus asinus) had got high Fic values. Fifteen illness categories had moderate Fic values. Highly cited animals in these illness categories were: Rusa unicolor (antiemetic), Reticulitermes spp. (diabetes), flesh of Varanus benghalensis (oral ailments), milk (eye ailments, fever) and urine (antidote) of Homo sepians, meat of Trachypithecus johnii (respiratory ailments), various parts of C. aegagrus hircus (blood ailments, coolants, diarrhea, pulmonary and urinary ailments), flesh of Chamaeleon zeyalnica (neural ailments), meat of Passer domesticus (aphrodisiac), curd and dung of Bos primigenius taurus (dermatological ailments), meat of G. domesticus (musculo-skeletal disorders, analgesic), meat of Lissemys punctata (hemorrhoids), and Pherthima posthuma (psychological ailments). Six illness categories had low Fic values. CONCLUSION: This study indicated that the animals are still being used by the local healers of Theni district, to treat various illnesses. Cross-disciplinary approaches to explore the full potential of animal-derived medicines will help to improve the health of local people.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Medicina Tradicional
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Seres Humanos
Índia
Organoterapia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1501
[Cu] Atualização por classe:140513
[Lr] Data última revisão:
140513
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:140401
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:24440438
[Au] Autor:Alonso-Castro AJ
[Ad] Endereço:Departamento de Sistemas Biológicos, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana unidad Xochimilco, Mexico. Electronic address: angeljosabad@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Use of medicinal fauna in Mexican traditional medicine.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;152(1):53-70, 2014 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] País de publicação:Ireland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Mexico has great biodiversity of fauna. The use of fauna with medicinal properties is a common practice since pre-Hispanic times. In the last decade, there has been an interest in ethnozoological studies in Mexico. Therefore, more studies are needed in order to gather information regarding the use of fauna with medicinal properties in México. Ethnozoological studies are necessary in order to discover new medications for human health. This review presents current information in terms of ethnozoological, conservation status, trade, toxicological and pharmacological effects of fauna used for medicinal purposes in Mexican traditional medicine (MTM), based on scientific literature. Future prospects for research with medicinal fauna are discussed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Bibliographic investigation was carried out by analyzing recognized books and peer-reviewed papers, consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases from the last five decades. Reports included in this review complied with the three criteria cited as follows: (i) used in Mexican traditional medicine for medicinal and/or magical-religious purposes, (ii) with experimental studies regarding the toxicological or medicinal effects and/or with studies exploring mechanisms of medicinal effects, and (iii) with information obtained from a clear source. RESULTS: A total of 163 animal species, belonging to 79 families and 4 taxonomic categories, used for medicinal purposes are reported in this review. Medicinal fauna used in MTM come from birds (48), fishes (3), insects (22), mammals (49) and reptiles (41). The most versatile species which had the greatest number of medicinal properties were Mephitis macroura (21 uses), Crotalus atrox (17 uses), Dasypus novemcinctus (13 uses) and Didelphis virginiana (13 uses). However, 14 of the 161 species listed in this review are classified as endangered. Animal species are mainly used for the treatment of inflammatory, respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. Furthermore, insects and reptiles are the animal groups with more pharmacological studies. Approximately, 11% and 5% of medicinal fauna have been tested in terms of their pharmacological and toxicological effects, respectively. CONCLUSION: Despite the use of medicinal fauna in MTM, during centuries, there are a very limited number of scientific studies published on this topic. This review highlights the need to perform pharmacological, toxicological and chemical studies with medicinal fauna used in MTM.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Biodiversidade
Medicina Tradicional/métodos
Organoterapia/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Etnofarmacologia
Seres Humanos
México
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1410
[Cu] Atualização por classe:140214
[Lr] Data última revisão:
140214
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:140121
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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