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[PMID]:28449910
[Au] Autor:Lü J; Huang L; Wu X; Fu W; Liu Y
[Ad] Endereço:Key Laboratory of Exercise and Health Sciences of Ministry of Education, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, 200438, China.
[Ti] Título:Effect of Tai Ji Quan training on self-reported sleep quality in elderly Chinese women with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trail.
[So] Source:Sleep Med;33:70-75, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5506
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a 24-week Tai Ji Quan training program on sleep quality, quality of life, and physical performance among elderly Chinese women with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: A 24-week randomized, controlled trial of 46 elderly women with knee OA. Participants were randomly assigned to either a Tai Ji Quan group (n = 23) or a control group (n = 23). Participants in the Tai Ji Quan group completed training sessions three times per week, while those in the control group had bi-weekly educational classes. The primary outcome was total score of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality of Index (PSQI). Secondary outcomes were: seven subscales of the PSQI; sleep latency; total sleep time; sleep efficiency; physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) of the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36); Berg Balance Scale (BBS); and Timed Up and Go (TUG). RESULTS: Compared with the control group, participants in the Tai Ji Quan group had significantly improved primary outcome (global PSQI score, p = 0.006) and secondary outcomes, including three PSQI sub-scores (sleep latency, p = 0.031; sleep duration, p = 0.043; daytime dysfunction, p = 0.007), total sleep time (p = 0.033), and SF-36 PCS (p = 0.006). The Tai Ji Quan group also had significant improvements compared with baseline in three PSQI sub-scores (sleep latency, p = 0.031; habitual sleep efficiency, p = 0.049; sleep disturbance, p = 0.016), sleep latency (p = 0.003), BBS (p = 0.001), and TUG (p = 0.006). CONCLUSION: Tai Ji Quan training is an effective treatment approach to improve sleep quality and quality of life in elderly Chinese women with knee OA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (June 16, 2013): ChiCTR-TRC-13003264.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Osteoartrite do Joelho/epidemiologia
Qualidade de Vida/psicologia
Autorrelato
Sono/fisiologia
Tai Ji/efeitos adversos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Idoso
China/epidemiologia
Exercício/psicologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Meia-Idade
Osteoartrite do Joelho/psicologia
Osteoartrite do Joelho/terapia
Avaliação de Resultados (Cuidados de Saúde)
Resultado do Tratamento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180216
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180216
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29020106
[Au] Autor:Gow BJ; Hausdorff JM; Manor B; Lipsitz LA; Macklin EA; Bonato P; Novak V; Peng CK; Ahn AC; Wayne PM
[Ad] Endereço:Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Can Tai Chi training impact fractal stride time dynamics, an index of gait health, in older adults? Cross-sectional and randomized trial studies.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0186212, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PURPOSE: To determine if Tai Chi (TC) has an impact on long-range correlations and fractal-like scaling in gait stride time dynamics, previously shown to be associated with aging, neurodegenerative disease, and fall risk. METHODS: Using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), this study evaluated the impact of TC mind-body exercise training on stride time dynamics assessed during 10 minute bouts of overground walking. A hybrid study design investigated long-term effects of TC via a cross-sectional comparison of 27 TC experts (24.5 ± 11.8 yrs experience) and 60 age- and gender matched TC-naïve older adults (50-70 yrs). Shorter-term effects of TC were assessed by randomly allocating TC-naïve participants to either 6 months of TC training or to a waitlist control. The alpha (α) long-range scaling coefficient derived from DFA and gait speed were evaluated as outcomes. RESULTS: Cross-sectional comparisons using confounder adjusted linear models suggest that TC experts exhibited significantly greater long-range scaling of gait stride time dynamics compared with TC-naïve adults. Longitudinal random-slopes with shared baseline models accounting for multiple confounders suggest that the effects of shorter-term TC training on gait dynamics were not statistically significant, but trended in the same direction as longer-term effects although effect sizes were very small. In contrast, gait speed was unaffected in both cross-sectional and longitudinal comparisons. CONCLUSION: These preliminary findings suggest that fractal-like measures of gait health may be sufficiently precise to capture the positive effects of exercise in the form of Tai Chi, thus warranting further investigation. These results motivate larger and longer-duration trials, in both healthy and health-challenged populations, to further evaluate the potential of Tai Chi to restore age-related declines in gait dynamics. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The randomized trial component of this study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01340365).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fractais
Marcha
Saúde
Tai Ji
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Cognição
Intervalos de Confiança
Estudos Transversais
Função Executiva
Feminino
Fidelidade a Diretrizes
Seres Humanos
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Seleção de Pacientes
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171117
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171117
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171012
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0186212


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[PMID]:28736853
[Au] Autor:Lomas-Vega R; Obrero-Gaitán E; Molina-Ortega FJ; Del-Pino-Casado R
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Health Science, University of Jaén, Jaén, Spain.
[Ti] Título:Tai Chi for Risk of Falls. A Meta-analysis.
[So] Source:J Am Geriatr Soc;65(9):2037-2043, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1532-5415
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: To analyze the effectiveness of tai chi for falls prevention. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. SETTING: Pubmed, Scopus, CINHAL, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) were searched to May 26, 2016. PARTICIPANTS: Older adult population and at-risk adults. INTERVENTION: Randomized controlled trials analyzing the effect of tai chi versus other treatments on risk of falls. MEASUREMENTS: The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for falls incidence and hazard ratio (HR) for time to first fall. RESULTS: The search strategy identified 891 potentially eligible studies, of which 10 met the inclusion criteria. There was high-quality evidence of a medium protective effect for fall incidence over the short term (IRR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.46, 0.70) and a small protective effect over the long term (IRR = 0.87; 95% CI = 0.77, 0.98). Regarding injurious falls, we found very low-quality evidence of a medium protective effect over the short term (IRR = 0.50; 95% CI = 0.33, 0.74) and a small effect over the long term (IRR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.54, 0.95). There was no effect on time to first fall, with moderate quality of evidence (HR = 0.98; 95% CI = 0.69, 1.37). CONCLUSION: In at-risk adults and older adults, tai chi practice may reduce the rate of falls and injury-related falls over the short term (<12 months) by approximately 43% and 50%, respectively. Tai chi practice may not influence time to first fall in these populations. Due to the low quality of evidence, more studies investigating the effects of tai chi on injurious falls and time to first fall are required.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Acidentes por Quedas/prevenção & controle
Equilíbrio Postural/fisiologia
Tai Ji/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Exercício
Seres Humanos
Incidência
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
Fatores de Risco
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170926
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170926
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170725
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/jgs.15008


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[PMID]:28587599
[Au] Autor:Vergeer I; Bennie JA; Charity MJ; Harvey JT; van Uffelen JGZ; Biddle SJH; Eime RM
[Ad] Endereço:Institute for Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield Campus, PO Box 4393, Raceview, QLD, 4305, Australia. ineke.vergeer@usq.edu.au.
[Ti] Título:Participation trends in holistic movement practices: a 10-year comparison of yoga/Pilates and t'ai chi/qigong use among a national sample of 195,926 Australians.
[So] Source:BMC Complement Altern Med;17(1):296, 2017 Jun 06.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6882
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: In recent decades, the evidence supporting the physical and mental health benefits of holistic movement practices such as yoga and t'ai chi have become increasingly established. Consequently, investigating the participation prevalence and patterns of these practices is a relevant pursuit in the public health field. Few studies have provided population-level assessment of participation rates, however, and even fewer have focused on patterns over time. The purpose of this study was to examine participation prevalence and trends in yoga/Pilates and t'ai chi/qigong over a ten-year period in a nationally representative sample of Australians aged 15 years and over, with particular attention to sex and age. A secondary purpose was to juxtapose these findings with participation trends in traditional fitness activities over the same period. METHODS: Data comprised modes and types of physical activity, age, and sex variables collected through the Exercise, Recreation and Sport Survey (ERASS), a series of independent cross-sectional Australia-wide surveys conducted yearly between 2001 and 2010. For each year, weighted population estimates were calculated for those participating in yoga/Pilates, t'ai chi/qigong, and fitness activities (e.g. aerobics, calisthenics). Linear regression and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to examine trends in prevalence rates over time and differences among sex and age (15-34; 35-54; 55+ years) groups, respectively. RESULTS: Average prevalence rates between 2001 and 2010 were 3.0% (95% CI 2.9-3.1) for yoga/Pilates, 0.6% (95% CI 0.5-0.6) for t'ai chi/qigong, and 19.2% (95% CI 18.9-19.4) for fitness activities. Across the decade, overall participation rates remained relatively stable for yoga/Pilates and t'ai chi/qigong, while increasing linearly for fitness activities. For both genders and in all three age groups, participation in fitness activities increased, whereas only in the 55+ age group was there a significant increase in yoga/Pilates participation; participation in t'ai chi/qigong declined significantly in the two younger age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Participation rates in yoga/Pilates and t'ai chi/qigong in Australia were low and relatively stable. As fitness activities increased in popularity across the decade, holistic movement practices did not. These findings point to the need to investigate activity-specific barriers and facilitators to participation, including intrapersonal, interpersonal, organisational, and environmental factors.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Técnicas de Exercício e de Movimento
Saúde Holística
Qigong/utilização
Tai Ji
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Austrália
Estudos Transversais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Tai Ji/utilização
Ioga
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170821
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170821
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170608
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12906-017-1800-6


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[PMID]:28570792
[Au] Autor:Yeung AS; Feng R; Kim DJH; Wayne PM; Yeh GY; Baer L; Lee OE; Denninger JW; Benson H; Fricchione GL; Alpert J; Fava M
[Ad] Endereço:MGH Depression Clinical and Research Program, One Bowdoin Sq, 6/F, Boston, MA 02114. ayeung@mgh.harvard.edu.
[Ti] Título:A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Study of Tai Chi With Passive and Active Controls in the Treatment of Depressed Chinese Americans.
[So] Source:J Clin Psychiatry;78(5):e522-e528, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1555-2101
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: This pilot, randomized clinical trial investigates the effectiveness of tai chi as the primary treatment for Chinese Americans with major depressive disorder (MDD). METHODS: 67 Chinese Americans with DSM-IV MDD and no treatment for depression were recruited between March 2012 and April 2013 and randomized (1:1:1) into a tai chi intervention, an education program, or a waitlisted group for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS17); positive response for this outcome was defined as a decrease in total score of 50% or more, and remission was defined as HDRS17 ≤ 7. RESULTS: Participants (N = 67) were 72% female with a mean age of 54 ± 13 years. No serious adverse events were reported. After the end of the 12-week intervention, response rates were 25%, 21%, and 56%, and remission rates were 10%, 21%, and 50% for the waitlisted, education, and tai chi intervention groups, respectively. The tai chi group showed improved treatment response when compared to both the waitlisted group (odds ratio [OR] = 2.11; 95% CI, 1.01-4.46) and to the education group (OR = 8.90; 95% CI, 1.17-67.70). Tai chi intervention showed significantly improved remission rate over the waitlisted group (OR = 3.01; 95% CI, 1.25-7.10), and a trend of improved remission compared to the education group (OR = 4.40; 95% CI, 0.78-24.17). CONCLUSIONS: As the primary treatment, tai chi improved treatment outcomes for Chinese Americans with MDD over both passive and active control groups. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01619631.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Americanos Asiáticos/psicologia
Transtorno Depressivo Maior/etnologia
Transtorno Depressivo Maior/terapia
Tai Ji/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Transtorno Depressivo Maior/psicologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Educação de Pacientes como Assunto
Projetos Piloto
Escalas de Graduação Psiquiátrica/estatística & dados numéricos
Psicometria
Resultado do Tratamento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170616
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170616
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170602
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28506776
[Au] Autor:Lee AC; Harvey WF; Price LL; Han X; Driban JB; Wong JB; Chung M; McAlindon TE; Wang C
[Ad] Endereço:Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA.
[Ti] Título:Mindfulness Is Associated With Treatment Response From Nonpharmacologic Exercise Interventions in Knee Osteoarthritis.
[So] Source:Arch Phys Med Rehabil;98(11):2265-2273.e1, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1532-821X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between baseline mindfulness and response from exercise interventions in knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: Cohort study; responder analysis of a clinical trial subset. SETTING: Urban tertiary care academic hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Participants with symptomatic, radiographic knee OA (N=86; mean age, 60y; 74% female; 48% white). INTERVENTIONS: Twelve weeks (twice per week) of Tai Chi or physical therapy exercise. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Treatment response was defined using Osteoarthritis Research Society International criteria indicating meaningful improvements in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, WOMAC function, or Patient Global Assessment scores. At baseline, participants completed the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (mean total score, 142±17) and were grouped into 3 categories of total mindfulness: higher, medium, or lower. Relative risk (RR) ratios were used to compare treatment response across groups. RESULTS: Participants with higher total mindfulness were 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.83) more likely to meet responder criteria than those with lower mindfulness. We found no significant difference between medium and lower mindfulness groups (RR=1.0; 95% CI, 0.69-1.44). Among the 5 mindfulness facets, medium acting-with-awareness was 46% (95% CI, 1.09-1.96) more likely to respond than lower acting-with-awareness, and higher acting-with-awareness was 34% more likely to respond, but this did not reach significance (95% CI, 0.97-1.86). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, higher mindfulness, primarily driven by its acting-with-awareness facet, was significantly associated with a greater likelihood of response to nonpharmacologic exercise interventions in knee OA. This suggests that mindfulness-cultivating interventions may increase the likelihood of response from exercise.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atenção Plena/métodos
Osteoartrite do Joelho/psicologia
Osteoartrite do Joelho/reabilitação
Modalidades de Fisioterapia
Tai Ji/métodos
Tai Ji/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Centros Médicos Acadêmicos
Idoso
Estudos de Coortes
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Medição da Dor
Qualidade de Vida
Método Simples-Cego
Fatores Socioeconômicos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171108
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171108
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170517
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28489508
[Au] Autor:Irwin MR; Olmstead R; Carrillo C; Sadeghi N; Nicassio P; Ganz PA; Bower JE
[Ad] Endereço:All authors: University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.
[Ti] Título:Tai Chi Chih Compared With Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Treatment of Insomnia in Survivors of Breast Cancer: A Randomized, Partially Blinded, Noninferiority Trial.
[So] Source:J Clin Oncol;35(23):2656-2665, 2017 Aug 10.
[Is] ISSN:1527-7755
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Purpose Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) and Tai Chi Chih (TCC), a movement meditation, improve insomnia symptoms. Here, we evaluated whether TCC is noninferior to CBT-I for the treatment of insomnia in survivors of breast cancer. Patients and Methods This was a randomized, partially blinded, noninferiority trial that involved survivors of breast cancer with insomnia who were recruited from the Los Angeles community from April 2008 to July 2012. After a 2-month phase-in period with repeated baseline assessment, participants were randomly assigned to 3 months of CBT-I or TCC and evaluated at months 2, 3 (post-treatment), 6, and 15 (follow-up). Primary outcome was insomnia treatment response-that is, marked clinical improvement of symptoms by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-at 15 months. Secondary outcomes were clinician-assessed remission of insomnia; sleep quality; total sleep time, sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, and awake after sleep onset, derived from sleep diaries; polysomnography; and symptoms of fatigue, sleepiness, and depression. Results Of 145 participants who were screened, 90 were randomly assigned (CBT-I: n = 45; TCC: n = 45). The proportion of participants who showed insomnia treatment response at 15 months was 43.7% and 46.7% in CBT-I and TCC, respectively. Tests of noninferiority showed that TCC was noninferior to CBT-I at 15 months ( P = .02) and at months 3 ( P = .02) and 6 ( P < .01). For secondary outcomes, insomnia remission was 46.2% and 37.9% in CBT-I and TCC, respectively. CBT-I and TCC groups showed robust improvements in sleep quality, sleep diary measures, and related symptoms (all P < .01), but not polysomnography, with similar improvements in both groups. Conclusion CBT-I and TCC produce clinically meaningful improvements in insomnia. TCC, a mindful movement meditation, was found to be statistically noninferior to CBT-I, the gold standard for behavioral treatment of insomnia.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Neoplasias da Mama/complicações
Terapia Cognitiva
Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/terapia
Sobreviventes
Tai Ji
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Depressão/etiologia
Fadiga/etiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Meia-Idade
Polissonografia
Método Simples-Cego
Sono
Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/complicações
Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/fisiopatologia
Avaliação de Sintomas
Fatores de Tempo
Resultado do Tratamento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170908
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170908
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170511
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1200/JCO.2016.71.0285


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[PMID]:28434472
[Au] Autor:Alsubiheen A; Petrofsky J; Daher N; Lohman E; Balbas E; Lee H
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Physical Therapy, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA; Department of Physical Therapy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
[Ti] Título:Tai Chi with mental imagery theory improves soleus H-reflex and nerve conduction velocity in patients with type 2 diabetes.
[So] Source:Complement Ther Med;31:59-64, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6963
[Cp] País de publicação:Scotland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: Diabetes is a disease that leads to damage to the peripheral nerves which may eventually cause balance instability. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 8 weeks of Tai Chi (TC) training combined with mental imagery (MI) on soleus H-reflex and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) of the sural and superficial peroneal nerves in people with diabetes. DESIGNS: Quasi-experimental, one group pretest-posttest design. SETTING: Human Research Laboratory. INTERVENTIONS: A series of Yang style of Tai Chi classes with mental imagery, one hour, two sessions per week for 8 weeks was done. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale, Functional Reach Test (FRT), and One Leg Standing Test (OLS) were measured as functional data. Hoffman reflex (H-reflex), and sural and superficial peroneal NCV were measured as main outcomes. RESULTS: All functional outcomes measures were significantly improved after the intervention (p<0.01). In the H-reflex, there was a significant increase in amplitude (µV) after completing 8 weeks of TC exercise (p=0.02). In the sural nerve, the velocity (p=0.01), amplitude (p=0.01), and latency (p=0.01) were significantly improved between pre and post-test. In the superficial peroneal nerve, significant improvements were observed in (p=0.02) and latency (p=0.01), but not in amplitude (µV) (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Combining TC intervention with MI theory showed an improvement in the H-reflex and NCV tests, which suggests improved balance and walking stability.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/terapia
Imagens (Psicoterapia)
Músculo Esquelético/inervação
Condução Nervosa/fisiologia
Tai Ji
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Idoso
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Músculo Esquelético/fisiologia
Nervo Fibular/fisiologia
Estudos Prospectivos
Nervo Sural/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170626
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170626
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170425
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28434462
[Au] Autor:Taylor E; Taylor-Piliae RE
[Ad] Endereço:College of Nursing, University of Arizona, 1305 N. Martin, PO BOX 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA. Electronic address: etaylor2@email.arizona.edu.
[Ti] Título:The effects of Tai Chi on physical and psychosocial function among persons with multiple sclerosis: A systematic review.
[So] Source:Complement Ther Med;31:100-108, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6963
[Cp] País de publicação:Scotland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: Conduct a systematic review to evaluate the effects of Tai Chi on physical and psychosocial function among individuals with Multiple Sclerosis. METHODS: An electronic literature search of 12 databases using controlled vocabulary function and keywords from inception through August 2016. All Tai Chi intervention studies assessing physical and psychosocial function among persons with Multiple Sclerosis were included. Study quality was scored using an established tool examining 16 study elements (range=0-32). RESULTS: A total of 91 articles were retrieved, with 3 additional articles identified through reviewing bibliographies of relevant articles. A total of 8 studies (randomized controlled trials, n=3; quasi-experimental, n=5) enrolled 193 participants with Multiple Sclerosis. Studies were conducted in the USA (n=3), Europe (n=3), Iran, (n=1), and India (n=1). A total of 3 studies reported using the Yang style of Tai Chi (not specified, n=5 studies). The Tai Chi intervention averaged 27 sessions over 11 weeks. Study quality scores for the randomized controlled trials had a mean score of 23 (range 19-26), while quality scores for quasi-experimental studies had a mean score of 20 (range 13-26). Overall, participants enrolled in Tai Chi had better balance, gait and flexibility, less fatigue and depression, and better quality of life after the intervention; though mixed results were reported. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that Tai Chi is likely safe and may provide physical and psychosocial benefits in individuals with Multiple Sclerosis. Further research is needed using more rigorous study designs to assess the benefits of Tai Chi for individuals with Multiple Sclerosis.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Depressão/terapia
Fadiga/terapia
Esclerose Múltipla
Tai Ji
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Esclerose Múltipla/psicologia
Esclerose Múltipla/terapia
Qualidade de Vida
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170626
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170626
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170425
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28427459
[Au] Autor:Zheng G; Xiong Z; Zheng X; Li J; Duan T; Qi D; Ling K; Chen L
[Ad] Endereço:College of Health Information Technology and Management, Shanghai University of Medicine & Health Sciences, Shanghai, 201318, China.
[Ti] Título:Subjective perceived impact of Tai Chi training on physical and mental health among community older adults at risk for ischemic stroke: a qualitative study.
[So] Source:BMC Complement Altern Med;17(1):221, 2017 Apr 20.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6882
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Evidence from quantitative studies suggest that Tai Chi produces a variety of health-related benefits, but few qualitative studies have investigated how older adults perceive the benefit of Tai Chi. The objective of the current study was to qualitatively evaluate the perceived benefits of Tai Chi practice among community older population. METHODS: This study was conducted with participants from a trial examining the effects of a 12-week Tai Chi training on ischemic stroke risk in community older adults (n = 170). A total of 20 participants were randomly selected from a convenience sample of participants who had completed 12-week Tai Chi training (n = 68) were interviewed regarding their perceived benefit on physical and mental health and whether Tai Chi exercise was suitable for the elderly. RESULTS: All participants agreed that Tai Chi training could relax their body and make them comfortable. Most of them thought Tai Chi training could promote physical health, including relieving pain, enhancing digestion, strengthening immunity, enhancing energy and improving sleep quality, enhancing their mental and emotional state (e.g. improving mood and reducing anxiety, improving concentration and promoting interpersonal relationship). Most of participants also agreed that Tai Chi exercise was appropriate for community older people. Three primary themes emerged from content analysis: Improving physical health; Enhancing mental and emotional state; Conforming with the request of the elderly. CONCLUSION: The findings indicate that regular Tai Chi exercise may have positive benefits in terms of improved physical health and mental state among community elderly population, and may be useful and feasible body-mind exercise to community elderly population for its positive effects and advantages. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ChiCTR ChiCTR-TRC-13003601 . Registered 23 July 2014.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Digestão
Emoções
Imunidade
Dor/prevenção & controle
Sono
Acidente Vascular Cerebral/prevenção & controle
Tai Ji
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Idoso
Autoavaliação Diagnóstica
Terapia por Exercício
Feminino
Saúde
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Saúde Mental
Meia-Idade
Relaxamento Muscular
Percepção
Pesquisa Qualitativa
Tai Ji/psicologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170731
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170731
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170422
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12906-017-1694-3



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