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  1 / 41800 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28465027
[Au] Autor:Nevin JA; Craig AR; Cunningham PJ; Podlesnik CA; Shahan TA; Sweeney MM
[Ad] Endereço:University of New Hampshire, United States. Electronic address: Tony.Nevin@unh.edu.
[Ti] Título:Quantitative models of persistence and relapse from the perspective of behavioral momentum theory: Fits and misfits.
[So] Source:Behav Processes;141(Pt 1):92-99, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8308
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We review quantitative accounts of behavioral momentum theory (BMT), its application to clinical treatment, and its extension to post-intervention relapse of target behavior. We suggest that its extension can account for relapse using reinstatement and renewal models, but that its application to resurgence is flawed both conceptually and in its failure to account for recent data. We propose that the enhanced persistence of target behavior engendered by alternative reinforcers is limited to their concurrent availability within a distinctive stimulus context. However, a failure to find effects of stimulus-correlated reinforcer rates in a Pavlovian-to-Instrumental Transfer (PIT) paradigm challenges even a straightforward Pavlovian account of alternative reinforcer effects. BMT has been valuable in understanding basic research findings and in guiding clinical applications and accounting for their data, but alternatives are needed that can account more effectively for resurgence while encompassing basic data on resistance to change as well as other forms of relapse.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Extinção Psicológica/fisiologia
Aprendizagem/fisiologia
Modelos Psicológicos
Reforço (Psicologia)
Transferência de Experiência (Psicologia)/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Recidiva
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180311
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180311
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 41800 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29444084
[Au] Autor:O'Sullivan DJ; O'Sullivan ME; O'Connell BD; O'Reilly K; Sarma KM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, National Forensic Mental Health Service, Dundrum, Dublin, Ireland.
[Ti] Título:Attributional style and depressive symptoms in a male prison sample.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0190394, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The reformulated learned helplessness model proposes that people who tend to make internal, stable, and global attributions in response to uncontrollable aversive events are more likely to develop depression. The present study sought to investigate the nature of the relationship between attributional style and depression in a male prison sample. One hundred and one adult male prisoners from four medium security prisons in Ireland completed the Attributional Style Questionnaire and measures of depression (BDI-II) and anxiety (BAI). Severity of self-reported depressive symptoms in the present sample was comparable to other prison and clinical samples, but higher than community samples. Participants were more severely affected by depressive symptoms than anxiety. The original attributional dimensions (i.e. internal, stable, and global) predicted a significant amount of variance in depression, but the model was not significant after controlling for anxiety. A subsequent regression model, comprising attributional dimensions for both negative events and positive events including a measure of 'uncontrollability', accounted for 35% of the variance in depression and the model retained significance while controlling for anxiety. An attributional model of depression may be relevant to the prison population and could provide a valid insight into the development and treatment of depressive symptoms in prisoners. The findings are interpreted in relation to previous research and implications for theory, clinical practice, and rehabilitation are discussed.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Depressão
Prisioneiros/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Estudos Transversais
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Modelos Psicológicos
Inquéritos e Questionários
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190394


  3 / 41800 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29394257
[Au] Autor:Yamaguchi K; Okada K
[Ad] Endereço:Graduate School of Education, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Título:Comparison among cognitive diagnostic models for the TIMSS 2007 fourth grade mathematics assessment.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0188691, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:A variety of cognitive diagnostic models (CDMs) have been developed in recent years to help with the diagnostic assessment and evaluation of students. Each model makes different assumptions about the relationship between students' achievement and skills, which makes it important to empirically investigate which CDMs better fit the actual data. In this study, we examined this question by comparatively fitting representative CDMs to the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007 assessment data across seven countries. The following two major findings emerged. First, in accordance with former studies, CDMs had a better fit than did the item response theory models. Second, main effects models generally had a better fit than other parsimonious or the saturated models. Related to the second finding, the fit of the traditional parsimonious models such as the DINA and DINO models were not optimal. The empirical educational implications of these findings are discussed.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cognição
Matemática
Modelos Psicológicos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Criança
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188691


  4 / 41800 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29240813
[Au] Autor:Yashar A; Denison RN
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology and Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, New York, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Feature reliability determines specificity and transfer of perceptual learning in orientation search.
[So] Source:PLoS Comput Biol;13(12):e1005882, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7358
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Training can modify the visual system to produce a substantial improvement on perceptual tasks and therefore has applications for treating visual deficits. Visual perceptual learning (VPL) is often specific to the trained feature, which gives insight into processes underlying brain plasticity, but limits VPL's effectiveness in rehabilitation. Under what circumstances VPL transfers to untrained stimuli is poorly understood. Here we report a qualitatively new phenomenon: intrinsic variation in the representation of features determines the transfer of VPL. Orientations around cardinal are represented more reliably than orientations around oblique in V1, which has been linked to behavioral consequences such as visual search asymmetries. We studied VPL for visual search of near-cardinal or oblique targets among distractors of the other orientation while controlling for other display and task attributes, including task precision, task difficulty, and stimulus exposure. Learning was the same in all training conditions; however, transfer depended on the orientation of the target, with full transfer of learning from near-cardinal to oblique targets but not the reverse. To evaluate the idea that representational reliability was the key difference between the orientations in determining VPL transfer, we created a model that combined orientation-dependent reliability, improvement of reliability with learning, and an optimal search strategy. Modeling suggested that not only search asymmetries but also the asymmetric transfer of VPL depended on preexisting differences between the reliability of near-cardinal and oblique representations. Transfer asymmetries in model behavior also depended on having different learning rates for targets and distractors, such that greater learning for low-reliability distractors facilitated transfer. These findings suggest that training on sensory features with intrinsically low reliability may maximize the generalizability of learning in complex visual environments.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Orientação/fisiologia
Transferência de Experiência (Psicologia)/fisiologia
Percepção Visual/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Encéfalo/fisiologia
Biologia Computacional
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Aprendizagem/fisiologia
Masculino
Modelos Neurológicos
Modelos Psicológicos
Plasticidade Neuronal/fisiologia
Estimulação Luminosa
Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
Aprendizagem Espacial/fisiologia
Análise e Desempenho de Tarefas
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005882


  5 / 41800 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28470162
[Au] Autor:Chae MO; Jeon HO; Kim A
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Nursing, College of Health Sciences, Cheongju University, Cheongju, Korea.
[Ti] Título:[A Structural Model for Premenstrual Coping in University Students: Based on Biopsychosocial Model].
[So] Source:J Korean Acad Nurs;47(2):257-266, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:2093-758X
[Cp] País de publicação:Korea (South)
[La] Idioma:kor
[Ab] Resumo:PURPOSE: The aims of this study were to construct a hypothetical structural model which explains premenstrual coping in university students and to test the fitness with collected data. METHODS: Participants were 206 unmarried women university students from 3 universities in A and B cities. Data were collected from March 29 until April 30, 2016 using self-report structured questionnaires and were analyzed using IBM SPSS 23.0 and AMOS 18.0. RESULTS: Physiological factor was identified as a significant predictor of premenstrual syndrome (t=6.45, p<.001). This model explained 22.1% of the variance in premenstrual syndrome. Psychological factors (t=-2.49, p=.013) and premenstrual syndrome (t=8.17, p<.001) were identified as significant predictors of premenstrual coping. Also this model explained 30.9% of the variance in premenstrual coping in university students. A physiological factors directly influenced premenstrual syndrome (ß=.41, p=.012). Premenstrual syndrome (ß=.55, p=.005) and physiological factor (ß=.23, p=.015) had significant total effects on premenstrual coping. Physiological factor did not have a direct influence on premenstrual coping, but indirectly affected it (ß=.22, p=.007). Psychological factors did not have an indirect or total effect on premenstrual coping, but directly affected it (ß=-.17, p=.036). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that strategies to control physiological factors such as menstrual pain should be helpful to improve premenstrual syndrome symptoms. When developing a program to improve premenstrual coping ability and quality of menstrual related health, it is important to consider psychological factors including perceived stress and menstrual attitude and premenstrual syndrome.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Adaptação Psicológica
Modelos Biológicos
Modelos Psicológicos
Síndrome Pré-Menstrual/psicologia
Estudantes/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Autorrelato
Apoio Social
Estresse Psicológico
Inquéritos e Questionários
Universidades
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4040/jkan.2017.47.2.257


  6 / 41800 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28458050
[Au] Autor:Rieth CA; Huber DE
[Ad] Endereço:Pacific Science and Engineering Group, Inc, United States.
[Ti] Título:Comparing different kinds of words and word-word relations to test an habituation model of priming.
[So] Source:Cogn Psychol;95:79-104, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1095-5623
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Huber and O'Reilly (2003) proposed that neural habituation exists to solve a temporal parsing problem, minimizing blending between one word and the next when words are visually presented in rapid succession. They developed a neural dynamics habituation model, explaining the finding that short duration primes produce positive priming whereas long duration primes produce negative repetition priming. The model contains three layers of processing, including a visual input layer, an orthographic layer, and a lexical-semantic layer. The predicted effect of prime duration depends both on this assumed representational hierarchy and the assumption that synaptic depression underlies habituation. The current study tested these assumptions by comparing different kinds of words (e.g., words versus non-words) and different kinds of word-word relations (e.g., associative versus repetition). For each experiment, the predictions of the original model were compared to an alternative model with different representational assumptions. Experiment 1 confirmed the prediction that non-words and inverted words require longer prime durations to eliminate positive repetition priming (i.e., a slower transition from positive to negative priming). Experiment 2 confirmed the prediction that associative priming increases and then decreases with increasing prime duration, but remains positive even with long duration primes. Experiment 3 replicated the effects of repetition and associative priming using a within-subjects design and combined these effects by examining target words that were expected to repeat (e.g., viewing the target word 'BACK' after the prime phrase 'back to'). These results support the originally assumed representational hierarchy and more generally the role of habituation in temporal parsing and priming.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Habituação Psicofisiológica/fisiologia
Modelos Psicológicos
Psicolinguística
Priming de Repetição/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Seres Humanos
Leitura
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180307
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180307
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 41800 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28448827
[Au] Autor:Broyd A; Balzan RP; Woodward TS; Allen P
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College, London, UK.
[Ti] Título:Dopamine, cognitive biases and assessment of certainty: A neurocognitive model of delusions.
[So] Source:Clin Psychol Rev;54:96-106, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7811
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This paper examines the evidence that delusions can be explained within the framework of a neurocognitive model of how the brain assesses certainty. Here, 'certainty' refers to both low-level interpretations of one's environment and high-level (conscious) appraisals of one's beliefs and experiences. A model is proposed explaining how the brain systems responsible for assigning certainty might dysfunction, contributing to the cause and maintenance of delusional beliefs. It is suggested that delusions arise through a combination of perturbed striatal dopamine and aberrant salience as well as cognitive biases such as the tendency to jump to conclusions (JTC) and hypersalience of evidence-hypothesis matches. The role of emotion, stress, trauma and sociocultural factors in forming and modifying delusions is also considered. Understanding the mechanisms involved in forming and maintaining delusions has important clinical implications, as interventions that improve cognitive flexibility (e.g. cognitive remediation therapy and mindfulness training) could potentially attenuate neurocognitive processes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cognição/fisiologia
Delusões/psicologia
Dopamina/metabolismo
Modelos Psicológicos
Psicologia do Esquizofrênico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Delusões/metabolismo
Seres Humanos
Testes Neuropsicológicos
Incerteza
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Nome de substância:
VTD58H1Z2X (Dopamine)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170428
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 41800 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28462480
[Au] Autor:Williamson TJ; Stanton AL; Austin JE; Valdimarsdottir HB; Wu LM; Krull JL; Rini CM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, University of California, 1285 Franz Hall, Box 951563, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.
[Ti] Título:Helping Yourself by Offering Help: Mediators of Expressive Helping in Survivors of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant.
[So] Source:Ann Behav Med;51(5):683-693, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1532-4796
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: A randomized experiment by Rini et al. (Health Psychol. 33(12):1541-1551, 2014) demonstrated that expressive helping, which involves three expressive writing sessions regarding hematopoietic stem cell transplant, followed by one writing session directed toward helping other stem cell transplant recipients, reduced psychological distress and bothersome physical symptoms among stem cell transplant recipients with elevated survivorship problems, relative to a neutral writing control condition. PURPOSE: The current study evaluated whether word use reflective of emotional expression, cognitive processing, and change in perspective mediates the effects of expressive helping. METHOD: The essays of 67 stem cell transplant recipients with high survivorship problems were analyzed with Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count. Multiple mediation modeling was used to test the hypothesized mechanisms of expressive helping on distress and bothersome physical symptoms. RESULTS: Relative to the control condition, expressive helping produced significant reductions in psychological distress and marginal reductions in physical symptom bother in the analyzed subset of participants from the parent study. Results indicated that positive emotion word use significantly mediated effects of expressive helping on reduced distress, but only for participants who used average (compared to above or below average) rates of negative emotion words. Cognitive processing and change in perspective did not significantly mediate benefits of expressive helping. CONCLUSIONS: Expressive helping carried its positive effects on distress through participants' higher expression of positive emotions when coupled with moderate rates of negative emotions. Findings highlight the benefit of expressing both positive and negative emotions in stressful situations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Sobreviventes de Câncer/psicologia
Cognição
Emoções
Transplante de Células-Tronco Hematopoéticas/psicologia
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto/estatística & dados numéricos
Redação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adaptação Psicológica
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Linguística
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Modelos Psicológicos
Estresse Psicológico/complicações
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12160-017-9892-2


  9 / 41800 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29173742
[Au] Autor:Wei C; Eisenberg RE; Ramos-Olazagasti MA; Wall M; Chen C; Bird HR; Canino G; Duarte CS
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center/New York State Psychiatric Institute (CUMC/NYSPI), New York.
[Ti] Título:Developmental Psychopathology in a Racial/Ethnic Minority Group: Are Cultural Risks Relevant?
[So] Source:J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry;56(12):1081-1088.e1, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1527-5418
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: The current study examined (a) the mediating role of parenting behaviors in the relationship between parental risks and youth antisocial behaviors (YASB), and (b) the role of youth cultural stress in a racial/ethnic minority group (i.e., Puerto Rican [PR] youth). METHOD: This longitudinal study consisted of 3 annual interviews of PR youth (N = 1,150; aged 10-14 years at wave 1) and their caretakers from the South Bronx (SB) in New York City and from San Juan, Puerto Rico. Parents reported on parental risks, parenting behaviors, and YASB. Youth also self-reported on YASB and youth cultural stress. A lagged structural equation model examined the relationship between these variables across 3 yearly waves, with youth cultural stress as a moderator of the association between effective parenting behaviors and YASB. RESULTS: Findings supported the positive influence of effective parenting on YASB, independently of past parental risks and past YASB: higher effective parenting significantly predicted lower YASB at the following wave. Parenting also accounted for (mediated) the association between the composite of parental risks and YASB. Youth cultural stress at wave 1 was cross-sectionally associated with higher YASB and moderated the prospective associations between effective parenting and YASB, such that for youth who perceived higher cultural stress, the positive effect of effective parenting on YASB was weakened compared to those with lower/average cultural stress. CONCLUSION: Among PR families, both parental and cultural risk factors influence YASB. Such findings should be considered when treating racial/ethnic minority youth for whom cultural factors may be a relevant influence on determining behaviors.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtorno da Conduta/etnologia
Cultura
Hispano-Americanos/psicologia
Grupos Minoritários/psicologia
Poder Familiar/psicologia
Assunção de Riscos
Estresse Psicológico/etnologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Criança
Transtorno da Conduta/psicologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Modelos Psicológicos
Modelos Estatísticos
Cidade de Nova Iorque
Estudos Prospectivos
Porto Rico/etnologia
Estresse Psicológico/psicologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  10 / 41800 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28461198
[Au] Autor:Hagger MS; Trost N; Keech JJ; Chan DKC; Hamilton K
[Ad] Endereço:School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Health Psychology and Behavioural Medicine Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; School of Applied Psychology and Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Faculty of Sport a
[Ti] Título:Predicting sugar consumption: Application of an integrated dual-process, dual-phase model.
[So] Source:Appetite;116:147-156, 2017 09 01.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8304
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Excess consumption of added dietary sugars is related to multiple metabolic problems and adverse health conditions. Identifying the modifiable social cognitive and motivational constructs that predict sugar consumption is important to inform behavioral interventions aimed at reducing sugar intake. We tested the efficacy of an integrated dual-process, dual-phase model derived from multiple theories to predict sugar consumption. Using a prospective design, university students (N = 90) completed initial measures of the reflective (autonomous and controlled motivation, intentions, attitudes, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control), impulsive (implicit attitudes), volitional (action and coping planning), and behavioral (past sugar consumption) components of the proposed model. Self-reported sugar consumption was measured two weeks later. A structural equation model revealed that intentions, implicit attitudes, and, indirectly, autonomous motivation to reduce sugar consumption had small, significant effects on sugar consumption. Attitudes, subjective norm, and, indirectly, autonomous motivation to reduce sugar consumption predicted intentions. There were no effects of the planning constructs. Model effects were independent of the effects of past sugar consumption. The model identified the relative contribution of reflective and impulsive components in predicting sugar consumption. Given the prominent role of the impulsive component, interventions that assist individuals in managing cues-to-action and behavioral monitoring are likely to be effective in regulating sugar consumption.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Regulação do Apetite
Açúcares da Dieta/administração & dosagem
Preferências Alimentares
Dieta Saudável
Modelos Biológicos
Modelos Psicológicos
Cooperação do Paciente
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adaptação Psicológica
Adulto
Austrália
Açúcares da Dieta/efeitos adversos
Feminino
Preferências Alimentares/psicologia
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Dieta Saudável/psicologia
Seres Humanos
Comportamento Impulsivo
Intenção
Masculino
Cooperação do Paciente/psicologia
Pacientes Desistentes do Tratamento
Autorrelato
Autocontrole/psicologia
Estudantes
Universidades
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Dietary Sugars)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180301
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180301
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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