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[PMID]:29271625
[Ti] Título:THE CHANGING FACE OF NURSING UNIFORMS.
[So] Source:Aust Nurs Midwifery J;24(9):16, 2017 04.
[Is] ISSN:2202-7114
[Cp] País de publicação:Australia
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Nursing uniforms have transformed dramatically over the past century on the back of emerging trends, demand for practicality and comfort, and strict workplace policy.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Vestuário
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: História do Século XX
Seres Humanos
Vestimenta Cirúrgica
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180118
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180118
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171223
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28221326
[Au] Autor:Spruce L; Conner R
[Ad] Endereço:Director of Evidence-Based Perioperative Practice Editor-in-Chief Guidelines for Perioperative Practice Association of periOperative Registered Nurses Denver, Colo.
[Ti] Título:Letter to the Editor.
[So] Source:JAAPA;30(3):1-2, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1547-1896
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Guias como Assunto
Lavanderia/normas
Vestimenta Cirúrgica/normas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170810
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170810
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:T
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170222
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/01.JAA.0000512234.38679.64


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[PMID]:28159077
[Au] Autor:Aleman-Ortega H; Lee R; Shambo L; Czinn E
[Ti] Título:Neuraxial Anesthesia and the Use of Sterile Gowning.
[So] Source:AORN J;105(2):184-192, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1878-0369
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Epidural or spinal anesthesia-related infections cause serious and devastating morbidity and mortality. The possible infectious complications of neuraxial anesthesia have become better understood in the past 10 years. We assessed information from published case series, studies, randomized controlled trials, and retrospective cohort studies to determine the rate of neuraxial infection and to evaluate iatrogenic causes of infection. The use of sterile gowning appears to be a factor associated with the decreased infection rates noted in some studies. A review of the literature demonstrated that personnel in interdisciplinary specialties use gowns for invasive procedures to prevent infection, and national and international multidisciplinary health care professionals appear to be increasing their use of sterile gowning to prevent infections. We undertook this literature review to explore the incidence of neuraxial infection, provide additional insight into multidisciplinary standards, and evaluate whether the use of sterile gowns while performing neuraxial anesthesia decreases infection rates.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Anestesia Epidural/efeitos adversos
Raquianestesia/efeitos adversos
Infecções Bacterianas/prevenção & controle
Complicações Intraoperatórias/prevenção & controle
Vestimenta Cirúrgica/utilização
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Infecções Bacterianas/epidemiologia
Seres Humanos
Incidência
Complicações Intraoperatórias/epidemiologia
Estudos Retrospectivos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171019
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171019
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170205
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28121034
[Au] Autor:Ploegmakers IB; Olde Damink SW; Breukink SO
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Título:Alternatives to antibiotics for prevention of surgical infection.
[So] Source:Br J Surg;104(2):e24-e33, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2168
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Surgical-site infection (SSI) is still the second most common healthcare-associated infection, after respiratory tract infection. SSIs are associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates, and result in enormous healthcare costs. In the past decade, several guidelines have been developed that aim to reduce the incidence of SSI. Unfortunately, there is no consensus amongst the guidelines, and some are already outdated. This review discusses the recent literature regarding alternatives to antibiotics for prevention of SSI. METHODS: A literature search of PubMed/MEDLINE was performed to retrieve data on the prevention of SSI. The focus was on literature published in the past decade. RESULTS: Prevention of SSI can be divided into preoperative, perioperative and postoperative measures. Preoperative measures consist of showering, surgical scrubbing and cleansing of the operation area with antiseptics. Perioperative factors can be subdivided as: environmental factors, such as surgical attire; patient-related factors, such as plasma glucose control; and surgical factors, such as the duration and invasiveness of surgery. Postoperative measures consist mainly of wound care. CONCLUSION: There is a general lack of evidence on the preventive effectiveness of perioperative measures to reduce the incidence of SSI. Most measures are based on common practice and perceived effectiveness. The lack of clinical evidence, together with the stability of the high incidence of SSI (10 per cent for colorectal procedures) in recent decades, highlights the need for future research.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/prevenção & controle
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Anti-Infecciosos Locais/uso terapêutico
Banhos
Competência Clínica
Drenagem
Desinfecção das Mãos
Seres Humanos
Controle de Infecções/métodos
Tratamento de Ferimentos com Pressão Negativa
Salas Cirúrgicas
Duração da Cirurgia
Cuidados Pós-Operatórios
Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto
Cuidados Pré-Operatórios
Fatores de Risco
Higiene da Pele
Vestimenta Cirúrgica
Irrigação Terapêutica
Reação Transfusional
Técnicas de Fechamento de Ferimentos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Anti-Infective Agents, Local)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170126
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/bjs.10426


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[PMID]:27692084
[Au] Autor:AORN
[Ti] Título:Guideline at a Glance: Surgical Attire.
[So] Source:AORN J;104(4):374-377, 2016 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1878-0369
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Vestuário/normas
Vestimenta Cirúrgica/normas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:GUIDELINE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171017
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171017
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161004
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:27248428
[Au] Autor:Fox JD; Prado G; Baquerizo Nole KL; Macquahe F; Herskovitz I; Rosa A; Akhtar S; Aldahan A; Shah V; Mlacker S; Cardenas G; Kirsner RS
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida.
[Ti] Título:Patient Preference in Dermatologist Attire in the Medical, Surgical, and Wound Care Settings.
[So] Source:JAMA Dermatol;152(8):913-9, 2016 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:2168-6084
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:IMPORTANCE: Patients' perceptions of their physician can affect subjective and objective outcomes. Physician attire influences patients' perceptions of their physician and consequently may affect patient outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To determine patient preferences for different types of dermatologist attire in dermatology medical, surgical, and wound care clinics. We hypothesized that patients in the dermatology medical setting would prefer professional attire, while patients in the dermatology surgical and wound care setting would prefer surgical scrubs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This study analyzed responses to a cross-sectional, anonymous survey by English-speaking dermatology patients (aged 18 years or older) at general, surgical, and wound care clinics in an academic center in Miami, Florida. Patients who could not read and understand the survey were excluded. Participants received pictures of a physician wearing business attire, professional attire, surgical attire, and casual attire, and responded by indicating which physician they preferred for each of 19 questions. Frequencies of responses were recorded, and χ2 and regression tests were performed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Response frequencies. RESULTS: Surveys were administered to 261 persons, and 255 participated and completed enough of the questions to be included in the outcome analyses (118 men, 121 women, 22 unknown [did not answer sex question]), mean (SD) age, 56.3 (18.6) years; about 49% of those who reported their sex were men; 56% were Hispanic; and 85% were white. Approximately 72% of respondents held a college degree or higher. About 63%, 24%, and 13% of respondents were medical, surgical, and wound care dermatology patients, respectively. Roughly 73%, 19%, 6%, and 2% of cumulative responses were for professional, surgical, business, and casual attire, respectively. Respondents who received a picture of a black male or black female physician were more likely to exclusively prefer professional attire: unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) 3.21 (95% CI, 1.39-7.42) and 2.78 (95% CI, 1.18-6.51), respectively, compared with respondents who received a picture of a white male physician. Nonwhite and unemployed respondents were less likely to prefer professional attire exclusively: ORs, 0.28 (95% CI, 0.1-0.83) and 0.28 (95% CI, 0.08-0.99), respectively. Respondents preferred professional attire in all clinic settings, though respondents in the dermatology surgery clinic were less likely to prefer professional attire compared with respondents in the medical dermatology clinic: race-adjusted OR, 0.74 (95% CI, 0.56-0.98). Wound care and medical dermatology respondents preferred professional attire comparably. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In this study, most patients preferred professional attire for their dermatologists in most settings. It is possible that patients' perceptions of their physicians' knowledge and skill is influenced by the physicians' appearance, and these perceptions may affect outcomes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Vestuário
Dermatologistas
Preferência do Paciente
Dermatopatias/terapia
Vestimenta Cirúrgica
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Afroamericanos
Idoso
Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Ambulatórios
Estudos Transversais
Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Dermatológicos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Médicas
Dermatopatias/diagnóstico
Inquéritos e Questionários
Desemprego
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170627
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170627
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160602
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamadermatol.2016.1186


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[PMID]:27164823
[Ti] Título:OPERATING ROOM NURSES ASSOCIATION OF CANADA (ORNAC) (OCTOBER 2015) STANDARDS FOR PERIOPERATIVE REGISTERED NURSING PRACTICE (12TH EDITION).
[So] Source:ORNAC J;34(1):20-3, 32-5, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1927-6141
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:eng; fre
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Enfermagem Perioperatória/normas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Canadá
Vestuário
Seres Humanos
Higiene
Joias
Sociedades de Enfermagem
Vestimenta Cirúrgica
Visitas a Pacientes
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1606
[Cu] Atualização por classe:160511
[Lr] Data última revisão:
160511
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160512
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:27164822
[Au] Autor:Spruce L
[Ti] Título:SURGICAL ATTIRE--MATTER OF PREFERENCE OR EVIDENCE?
[So] Source:ORNAC J;34(1):14-9, 25-31, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1927-6141
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:eng; fre
[Ab] Resumo:Surgical attire can be an emotional and controversial topic among health care providers. The reality, however, is that exposing perioperative patients to the skin and hair of the perioperative team members may be putting patients at risk for a surgical site infection.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Enfermagem de Centro Cirúrgico
Vestimenta Cirúrgica
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Desenho de Equipamento
Seres Humanos
Lavanderia
Máscaras
Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/prevenção & controle
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1606
[Cu] Atualização por classe:160511
[Lr] Data última revisão:
160511
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160512
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:27124823
[Au] Autor:Gershkovich GE; Tiedeken NC; Hampton D; Budacki R; Samuel SP; Saing M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA.
[Ti] Título:A Comparison of Three C-Arm Draping Techniques to Minimize Contamination of the Surgical Field.
[So] Source:J Orthop Trauma;30(10):e351-6, 2016 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1531-2291
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The use of intraoperative fluoroscopy has become a routine and useful adjunct within orthopaedic surgery. However, the fluoroscopy machine may become an additional source of contamination in the operating room, particularly when maneuvering from the anterior-posterior position to the lateral position. Consequently, draping techniques were developed to maintain sterility of the operative field and surgeon. Despite a variety of methods, no studies exist to compare the sterility of these techniques specifically when the fluoroscopy machine is in the lateral imaging position. We evaluated the sterility of 3 c-arm draping techniques in a simulated operative environment. The 3 techniques consisted of a traditional 3-quarter sterile sheet attached to the side of the operative table, a modified clip-drape method, and a commercially available sterile pouch. Our study demonstrated that the traditional method poses a high risk for sterile field contamination, whereas the modified clip-drape method and commercially available sterile pouch kept floor contamination furthest from the surgical field. With the current data, we urge surgeons to use modified techniques rather than the traditional draping method.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fluoroscopia/efeitos adversos
Controle de Infecções/métodos
Procedimentos Ortopédicos/efeitos adversos
Procedimentos Ortopédicos/métodos
Campos Cirúrgicos
Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/prevenção & controle
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Contaminação de Equipamentos
Seres Humanos
Cuidados Intraoperatórios
Salas Cirúrgicas/normas
Procedimentos Ortopédicos/instrumentação
Procedimentos Ortopédicos/normas
Vestimenta Cirúrgica/microbiologia
Campos Cirúrgicos/microbiologia
Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/etiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170817
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170817
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/BOT.0000000000000619


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[PMID]:27116208
[Au] Autor:Jennings JD; Ciaravino SG; Ramsey FV; Haydel C
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, Temple University Hospital, 3401 North Broad Street, Zone B 5th Floor, Philadelphia, PA, 19140, USA. john.jennings@temple.edu.
[Ti] Título:Physicians' Attire Influences Patients' Perceptions in the Urban Outpatient Orthopaedic Surgery Setting.
[So] Source:Clin Orthop Relat Res;474(9):1908-18, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1528-1132
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Previous work has established that physician attire influences patients' perceptions of their physicians. However, research from different specialties has disagreed regarding what kinds of physician attire might result in increased trust and confidence on the part of patients. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: The purpose of this study was to investigate how surgeon attire affects patients' perceptions of trust and confidence in an urban orthopaedic outpatient setting. METHODS: Eighty-five of 100 patients solicited completed a three-part questionnaire in the outpatient orthopaedic clinic at an urban teaching hospital. In the first section, participants viewed eight images, four of a male surgeon and four of a female surgeon wearing a white coat over formal attire, scrubs, business attire, and casual attire, and rated each image on a five-level Likert scale. Participants were asked how confident, trustworthy, safe, caring, and smart the surgeon appeared, how well the surgery would go, and how willing they would be to discuss personal information with the pictured surgeon. The participant ranked all images from most to least confident in the second part and the last section obtained demographic information from the patients. Surveys were scored using a five-level Likert scale and a Friedman test was used to detect statistical significance when comparing all attires. For multiple pairwise comparisons, a Bonferroni correction was applied. RESULTS: The white coat on the male surgeon elicited modestly higher ratings in confidence (mean difference [MD], 0.367 ± 0.737; 95% CI, 0.202-0.532; p < 0.001), intelligence (MD, 0.216 ± 0.603; 95% CI, 0.077-0.356; p = 0.027), surgical skill (MD, 0.325 ± 0.658; 95% CI, 0.175-0.474; p < 0.001), trust (MD, 0.312 ± 0.613; 95% CI, 0.173-0.451; p < 0.001), ability to discuss confidential information (MD, 0.253 ± 0.742; 95% CI, 0.087-0.419; p = 0.023), caring (MD, 0.279 ± 0.655; 95% CI, 0.124-0.432; p = 0.006), and safety (MD, 0.260 ± 0.594; 95% CI, 0.125-0.395; p = 0.002) compared with business attire. Similarly, the white coat was preferred to casual attire in all categories (confidence: MD, 0.810 ± 0.921; smart: MD, 0.493 ± 0.801; surgical skill: MD, 0.640 ± 0.880; ability to discuss: MD, 0.564 ± 0.988; trust: MD, 0.545 ± 0.836; safety: MD, 0.581 ± 0.860; caring: MD, 0.479 ± 0.852; p < 0.001 for all comparisons). For the female surgeon, white coat and scrubs were not different, however the white coat was preferred to business attire in four of seven categories. Casual clothing was widely disliked in all categories for surgeons (men and women). When attire was compared for confidence on a scale, the white coat ranked higher than business (MD, 0.439 ± 1.491; p = 0.006) and casual attire (MD, 1.043 ± 2.054; p < 0.001), but not scrubs (MD, 0.169 ± 1.230; p = 1.000). CONCLUSIONS: In this urban outpatient orthopaedic practice, patients' preferences varied based on the sex of the pictured surgeon in the survey. Overall, however, modest preferences were observed for the white coat in terms of confidence, intelligence, trust, and safety. Furthermore patients are more willing to discuss personal information and believe that their surgery will go better if the surgeon wears a white coat or scrubs. These results are consistent with those of several studies in other settings and therefore may be generalizable in other locations and specialties. Given the increasing awareness and concern for physician-spread hospital infection, this study lends support to scrub attire over business or casual attire if physicians do not wear a white coat. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, therapeutic study.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Ambulatórios
Vestuário
Procedimentos Ortopédicos
Cirugiões Ortopédicos
Preferência do Paciente
Pacientes/psicologia
Vestimenta Cirúrgica
Serviços Urbanos de Saúde
Percepção Visual
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Estudos Transversais
Feminino
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Hospitais de Ensino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Philadelphia
Fotografia
Relações Médico-Paciente
Estudos Prospectivos
Inquéritos e Questionários
Confiança
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1702
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170902
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170902
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160427
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11999-016-4855-7



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