Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : E07.796 [Categoria DeCS]
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[PMID]:29386435
[Au] Autor:Murakami M; Toraishi K; Koinuma M; Amano M
[Ad] Endereço:School of Pharmacy, Hyogo University of Health Sciences.
[Ti] Título:[Modification of the Insulin Pen Assistive Device to Improve the Usability and Its Evaluation].
[So] Source:Yakugaku Zasshi;138(2):221-228, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1347-5231
[Cp] País de publicação:Japan
[La] Idioma:jpn
[Ab] Resumo: In this study, we prepared 4 assistive devices (A-D) for Miriopen to improve the "ease of holding" and "ease of pushing" and compared their usability with that of a device provided by the pharmaceutical company (S). Fifty-five healthy volunteers in their 20s performed the self-injection maneuver using all 5 assistive devices and ranked them regarding 3 items, i.e., the "ease of holding", "ease of pushing", and "overall ease of administration". In all evaluation items, C was ranked first by the largest number of subjects, and the ranking by the subjects was shown by Kendall's coefficient of concordance to be consistent. In addition, comparison of the distance scale calculated from the ordinal scale showed significantly higher ranks of C and D compared with A, B, and S in all evaluation items. No significant difference was noted between C and D. Since C and D had shapes with concavities and convexities that fit the index, middle, and ring fingers (2nd-4th fingers), the fingers are considered to be better stabilized during the injection maneuver with consequent high ratings. Moreover, the 4 assistive devices prepared in this study were rated to be equal to or higher than S.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Desenho de Equipamento
Hipoglicemiantes/administração & dosagem
Insulina/administração & dosagem
Equipamentos de Autoajuda
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Diabetes Mellitus/tratamento farmacológico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Injeções Intramusculares/instrumentação
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:EVALUATION STUDIES; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Hypoglycemic Agents); 0 (Insulin)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180228
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180228
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1248/yakushi.17-00097


  2 / 3996 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29304035
[Au] Autor:Frost K; Bertocci G; Smalley C
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Bioengineering, J.B. Speed School of Engineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint practices in paratransit vehicles.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0186829, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The purpose of this study was to characterize wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint system (WTORS) usage in paratransit vehicles based on observations of wheelchair and scooter (wheeled mobility devices, collectively, "WhMD") passenger trips. A retrospective review of on-board video monitoring recordings of WhMD trips was conducted. Four hundred seventy-five video recordings were collected for review and analysis. The use of all four tiedowns to secure the WhMD was observed more frequently for power WhMDs (82%) and manual WhMDs (80%) compared to scooters (39%), and this difference was significant (p< 0.01). Nonuse or misuse of the occupant restraint system occurred during 88% of WhMD trips, and was most frequently due to vehicle operator neglect in applying the shoulder belt. Despite the absence of incidents or injuries in this study, misuse and nonuse of WTORS potentially place WhMD seated passengers at higher risk of injury during transit. These findings support the need for improved vehicle operator training and passenger education on the proper use of WTORS and development of WTORS with improved usability and/or alternative technologies that can be automated or used independently.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Veículos Automotores
Equipamentos de Proteção/utilização
Cintos de Segurança
Cadeiras de Rodas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Acidentes de Trânsito/prevenção & controle
Pessoas com Deficiência
Seres Humanos
Kentucky
Estudos Retrospectivos
Segurança
Cintos de Segurança/utilização
Equipamentos de Autoajuda/utilização
Gravação em Vídeo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180210
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180210
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180106
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0186829


  3 / 3996 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29257639
[Au] Autor:Horton E; Livingstone A; Dodd E
[Ti] Título:A COLLABORATIVE PROJECT.
[So] Source:Aust Nurs Midwifery J;24(7):35, 2017 02.
[Is] ISSN:2202-7114
[Cp] País de publicação:Australia
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The Queensland government Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services has funded Community Resourcing to establish the Community Care Smart Assistive Technology Collaborative (CCSATC) online space.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Acesso à Informação
Pessoas com Deficiência
Equipamentos de Autoajuda
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Comportamento Cooperativo
Seres Humanos
Desenvolvimento de Programas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180118
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180118
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171220
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:25815682
[Au] Autor:Bouck EC; Flanagan SM
[Ad] Endereço:a Department of Counseling , Educational Psychology, and Special Education, Michigan State University , East Lansing , MI , USA and.
[Ti] Título:Exploring assistive technology and post-school outcomes for students with severe disabilities.
[So] Source:Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol;11(8):645-52, 2016 11.
[Is] ISSN:1748-3115
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PURPOSE: This study sought to understand the extent to which students with severe disabilities receive assistive technology in school and out-of-school, and the relationship between receipt of assistive technology in school and post-school outcomes for these students. METHOD: This study was a secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) from the USA. To analyze the data in this correlational study, researchers conducted frequency distributions, Chi Square Tests of Associations, significance tests and logistic regressions. RESULTS: The main results suggest (a) receipt of assistive technology in school varied greatly by disability identification; (b) receipt of assistive technology post-school also varied by disability identification, but receipt was generally lower; and (c) few statistically significant post-school outcome differences existed between students who received assistive technology and those who did not. CONCLUSION: An under-utilization of assistive technology exists in practice in the USA for students with severe disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation An under-utilization of assistive technology for secondary students and adults with severe disabilities likely exists. A need exists for improved collaboration between professionals in rehabilitation and professionals in schools to ensure continuation of needed services or aids, such as assistive technology. Additional research is needed to better understand the adult life (or post-school) outcomes of individuals with severe disabilities, factors from PK-12 schooling or post-school services that positively and negative impact those outcomes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Pessoas com Deficiência/reabilitação
Emprego/estatística & dados numéricos
Instituições Acadêmicas/estatística & dados numéricos
Equipamentos de Autoajuda/utilização
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Modelos Logísticos
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Índice de Gravidade de Doença
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171214
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171214
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:150328
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3109/17483107.2015.1029537


  5 / 3996 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:25815679
[Au] Autor:Carver J; Ganus A; Ivey JM; Plummer T; Eubank A
[Ad] Endereço:a School of Occupational Therapy, Belmont University , Nashville , TN , USA.
[Ti] Título:The impact of mobility assistive technology devices on participation for individuals with disabilities.
[So] Source:Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol;11(6):468-77, 2016 08.
[Is] ISSN:1748-3115
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:AIM: This study aims to address the gap in research and contribute to the body of knowledge on the perspectives assistive technology device users have toward their devices. METHOD: Mixed methods were used to better understand the impact of mobility assistive technology devices (MATDs) on participation for individuals with disabilities. The Functional Mobility Assessment was administered in conjunction with two qualitative questions developed by the research team allowing participants to expound on the impact of their MATD experience. Participants were recruited online via the National Spinal Cord Injury Association website and in-person at Abilities Expo in Atlanta, Georgia, and the International Seating Symposium in Nashville, Tennessee. RESULTS: Results are consistent with findings from prior research regarding accessibility for individuals with disabilities. Corresponding findings were found in both the quantitative and qualitative data and are categorized into several major themes: environment (indoor and outdoor), surface heights, transportation, dependence, independence, quality of life and participation. CONCLUSION: Quantitative data from this study indicate that users of MATD are satisfied with the way in which their devices enable maneuvering indoors, while qualitative data suggest otherwise. Implications for healthcare practitioners are described and future recommendations are provided. Implications for Rehabilitation Healthcare professionals should advocate for proper mobility assistive technology devices (MATDs) for their patients in order to enable increased independence, safety and efficiency. Healthcare professionals must be cognizant of the impact of the environment and/or environmental barriers when prescribing MATD. Additional areas of interest for future research may include investigating the impact of MATD in association with date of onset of disability, according to diagnoses, or specific to length of time since acquiring the device.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Pessoas com Deficiência/reabilitação
Equipamentos de Autoajuda
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Bengala
Meio Ambiente
Georgia
Seres Humanos
Vida Independente
Entrevistas como Assunto
Qualidade de Vida
Participação Social
Transportes
Andadores
Cadeiras de Rodas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171214
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171214
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:150328
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3109/17483107.2015.1027295


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[PMID]:29176406
[Au] Autor:Bertrand K; Raymond MH; Miller WC; Martin Ginis KA; Demers L
[Ad] Endereço:From the Université de Montréal, Faculty of Medicine, School of Rehabilitation, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (KB, M-HR, LD); Rehabilitation Research Program, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (WCM); Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (WCM); School of Health and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Development, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada (KAMG); and Research Centre, Institut Universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, CIUSS du Centre-Sud-de-l'Île-de-Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (LD).
[Ti] Título:Walking Aids for Enabling Activity and Participation: A Systematic Review.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Med Rehabil;96(12):894-903, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1537-7385
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In this systematic literature review, we examined whether and how walking aids (i.e., canes, crutches, walkers, and rollators) enable activity and participation among adults with physical disabilities. Medline, Embase, all EBM reviews, PsychInfo, CINAHL, and Web of Science databases were used to identify studies published since 2008. Quantitative and qualitative designs were included. Data regarding participants, assistive device use, outcome measures, and domains of participation were extracted. Two reviewers independently rated the level of evidence and methodological quality of the studies. Outcomes were categorized per types of walking aids and activity and participation domains. Thirteen studies were included. Two studies involved canes, four pertained to rollators, and seven dealt with multiple types of walking aids. Mobility was the most frequently examined domain of activity and participation. Both negative and positive results were found. Negative outcomes were linked to the physical characteristics of the device, the use, environment, and personal reluctance. When incorporated in daily life, walking aids were found to enable several domains of activity and participation. Whether walking aids facilitate activity and participation may depend on the user's ability to overcome obstacles and integrate them in daily life. More high-quality research is needed to draw conclusions about their effectiveness.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Pessoas com Deficiência/reabilitação
Equipamentos Ortopédicos/utilização
Qualidade de Vida
Equipamentos de Autoajuda/utilização
Caminhada/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Bengala/utilização
Muletas/utilização
Avaliação da Deficiência
Estudos de Avaliação como Assunto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Resultado do Tratamento
Andadores/utilização
Caminhada/psicologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171211
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171211
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/PHM.0000000000000836


  7 / 3996 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28700719
[Au] Autor:Song YS; Ha S; Hsu H; Ting LH; Liu CK
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Mechanical Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Stair negotiation made easier using novel interactive energy-recycling assistive stairs.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0179637, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Here we show that novel, energy-recycling stairs reduce the amount of work required for humans to both ascend and descend stairs. Our low-power, interactive, and modular steps can be placed on existing staircases, storing energy during stair descent and returning that energy to the user during stair ascent. Energy is recycled through event-triggered latching and unlatching of passive springs without the use of powered actuators. When ascending the energy-recycling stairs, naive users generated 17.4 ± 6.9% less positive work with their leading legs compared to conventional stairs, with the knee joint positive work reduced by 37.7 ± 10.5%. Users also generated 21.9 ± 17.8% less negative work with their trailing legs during stair descent, with ankle joint negative work reduced by 26.0 ± 15.9%. Our low-power energy-recycling stairs have the potential to assist people with mobility impairments during stair negotiation on existing staircases.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Equipamentos de Autoajuda
Subida de Escada/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Fenômenos Biomecânicos
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Articulação do Joelho/fisiologia
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170926
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170926
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170713
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0179637


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[PMID]:28700630
[Au] Autor:Dembia CL; Silder A; Uchida TK; Hicks JL; Delp SL
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Simulating ideal assistive devices to reduce the metabolic cost of walking with heavy loads.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0180320, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Wearable robotic devices can restore and enhance mobility. There is growing interest in designing devices that reduce the metabolic cost of walking; however, designers lack guidelines for which joints to assist and when to provide the assistance. To help address this problem, we used musculoskeletal simulation to predict how hypothetical devices affect muscle activity and metabolic cost when walking with heavy loads. We explored 7 massless devices, each providing unrestricted torque at one degree of freedom in one direction (hip abduction, hip flexion, hip extension, knee flexion, knee extension, ankle plantarflexion, or ankle dorsiflexion). We used the Computed Muscle Control algorithm in OpenSim to find device torque profiles that minimized the sum of squared muscle activations while tracking measured kinematics of loaded walking without assistance. We then examined the metabolic savings provided by each device, the corresponding device torque profiles, and the resulting changes in muscle activity. We found that the hip flexion, knee flexion, and hip abduction devices provided greater metabolic savings than the ankle plantarflexion device. The hip abduction device had the greatest ratio of metabolic savings to peak instantaneous positive device power, suggesting that frontal-plane hip assistance may be an efficient way to reduce metabolic cost. Overall, the device torque profiles generally differed from the corresponding net joint moment generated by muscles without assistance, and occasionally exceeded the net joint moment to reduce muscle activity at other degrees of freedom. Many devices affected the activity of muscles elsewhere in the limb; for example, the hip flexion device affected muscles that span the ankle joint. Our results may help experimentalists decide which joint motions to target when building devices and can provide intuition for how devices may interact with the musculoskeletal system. The simulations are freely available online, allowing others to reproduce and extend our work.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Metabolismo Energético
Equipamentos de Autoajuda
Caminhada/fisiologia
Suporte de Carga/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Fenômenos Biomecânicos
Quadril/fisiologia
Seres Humanos
Joelho/fisiologia
Masculino
Músculo Esquelético/fisiologia
Robótica/instrumentação
Torque
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170926
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170926
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170713
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0180320


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[PMID]:28661948
[Au] Autor:Newland P; Kimutis A; Salter A; Flick L; Thomas FP; Rantz M; Skubic M
[Ti] Título:Continuous In-Home Symptom and Mobility Measures for Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis: A Case Presentation.
[So] Source:J Neurosci Nurs;49(4):241-246, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1945-2810
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Gait impairment represents one of the most common and disabling symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS). To identify which temporal or spatial parameters of gait could be used as outcome measures in interventional studies of individuals with MS with different levels of disability, we evaluated characteristics of these parameters in a case study of 3 participants with MS, using 1 case as an exemplar and the other participants as validation. A case study of an exemplar participant was conducted with a 67-year-old woman with secondary progressive MS served as exemplar, with 2 other participants (52 and 55 years old) as validation. The primary outcome measures we used were stride time, stride length, gait velocity, and daily symptoms. Stride length and velocity of gait decreased with increasing pain and fatigue. The step time was significantly longer later in the day, whereas the step length remained the same. Stride length and velocity are associated with the level of fatigue and pain, as well as the time of day. These characteristics and parameters of gait need to be considered in future studies of gait in MS, with particular attention to temporality of occurrence in persons with MS.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtornos Neurológicos da Marcha/terapia
Limitação da Mobilidade
Esclerose Múltipla/complicações
Amplitude de Movimento Articular/fisiologia
Equipamentos de Autoajuda/utilização
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adjuvantes Imunológicos/uso terapêutico
Idoso
Feminino
Transtornos Neurológicos da Marcha/etiologia
Acetato de Glatiramer/uso terapêutico
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Esclerose Múltipla/tratamento farmacológico
Andadores
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Adjuvants, Immunologic); 5M691HL4BO (Glatiramer Acetate)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170717
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170717
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170630
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/JNN.0000000000000299


  10 / 3996 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28602027
[Au] Autor:Van der Roest HG; Wenborn J; Pastink C; Dröes RM; Orrell M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1007 MB.
[Ti] Título:Assistive technology for memory support in dementia.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;6:CD009627, 2017 06 11.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The sustained interest in electronic assistive technology in dementia care has been fuelled by the urgent need to develop useful approaches to help support people with dementia at home. Also the low costs and wide availability of electronic devices make it more feasible to use electronic devices for the benefit of disabled persons. Information Communication Technology (ICT) devices designed to support people with dementia are usually referred to as Assistive Technology (AT) or Electronic Assistive Technology (EAT). By using AT in this review we refer to electronic assistive devices. A range of AT devices has been developed to support people with dementia and their carers to manage their daily activities and to enhance safety, for example electronic pill boxes, picture phones, or mobile tracking devices. Many are commercially available. However, the usefulness and user-friendliness of these devices are often poorly evaluated. Although reviews of (electronic) memory aids do exist, a systematic review of studies focusing on the efficacy of AT for memory support in people with dementia is lacking. Such a review would guide people with dementia and their informal and professional carers in selecting appropriate AT devices. OBJECTIVES: Primary objectiveTo assess the efficacy of AT for memory support in people with dementia in terms of daily performance of personal and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL), level of dependency, and admission to long-term care. Secondary objectiveTo assess the impact of AT on: users (autonomy, usefulness and user-friendliness, adoption of AT); cognitive function and neuropsychiatric symptoms; need for informal and formal care; perceived quality of life; informal carer burden, self-esteem and feelings of competence; formal carer work satisfaction, workload and feelings of competence; and adverse events. SEARCH METHODS: We searched ALOIS, the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group (CDCIG), on 10 November 2016. ALOIS is maintained by the Information Specialists of the CDCIG and contains studies in the areas of dementia prevention, dementia treatment and cognitive enhancement in healthy people. We also searched the following list of databases, adapting the search strategy as necessary: Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) Databases, up to May 2016; The Collection of Computer Science Bibliographies; DBLP Computer Science Bibliography; HCI Bibliography: Human-Computer Interaction Resources; and AgeInfo, all to June 2016; PiCarta; Inspec; Springer Link Lecture Notes; Social Care Online; and IEEE Computer Society Digital Library, all to October 2016; J-STAGE: Japan Science and Technology Information Aggregator, Electronic; and Networked Computer Science Technical Reference Library (NCSTRL), both to November 2016; Computing Research Repository (CoRR) up to December 2016; and OT seeker; and ADEAR, both to February 2017. In addition, we searched Google Scholar and OpenSIGLE for grey literature. SELECTION CRITERIA: We intended to review randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and clustered randomised trials with blinded assessment of outcomes that evaluated an electronic assistive device used with the single aim of supporting memory function in people diagnosed with dementia. The control interventions could either be 'care (or treatment) as usual' or non-technological psychosocial interventions (including interventions that use non-electronic assistive devices) also specifically aimed at supporting memory. Outcome measures included activities of daily living, level of dependency, clinical and care-related outcomes (for example admission to long-term care), perceived quality of life and well-being, and adverse events resulting from the use of AT; as well as the effects of AT on carers. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened all titles and abstracts identified by the search. MAIN RESULTS: We identified no studies which met the inclusion criteria. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This review highlights the current lack of high-quality evidence to determine whether AT is effective in supporting people with dementia to manage their memory problems.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Demência
Eletrônica Médica
Memória
Equipamentos de Autoajuda
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Atividades Cotidianas
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170816
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170816
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170612
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD009627.pub2



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