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[PMID]:28471245
[Au] Autor:Peer N
[Ad] Endereço:a Non-communicable Diseases Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council , Durban , South Africa.
[Ti] Título:There has been little progress in implementing comprehensive alcohol control strategies in Africa.
[So] Source:Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse;43(6):631-635, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1097-9891
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Alcohol is the most common substance of addiction and a threat not only to health but also to sustainable human development. Consequently, at least a 10% relative reduction in the harmful use of alcohol has been advocated by the World Health Organization (WHO). This perspective describes alcohol use in Africa, strategies to reduce harmful alcohol use, and the ability of African countries to meet this target. Although alcohol consumption in Africa was intermediate compared to other world regions, the total alcohol per capita among alcohol consumers was the second highest (19.5 liters); 19% of Sub-Saharan African men could be classified as binge drinkers. The alcohol industry is the key driver behind the uptake of alcohol use and misuse. The most cost-effective ways to reduce alcohol-related harm is to make alcohol less available and more expensive and to prohibit alcohol advertising. Most African countries have alcohol excise taxes, but these are not adjusted for inflation, meaning that the effectiveness of these taxes will likely decrease with time, leading to greater affordability. The majority of African countries do not have legally binding regulations for alcohol marketing. Alcohol misuse in Africa is not being addressed at a time when available strategies can efficiently and cost-effectively control alcohol-related harm.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia
Redução do Dano
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
África/epidemiologia
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/economia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Marketing/legislação & jurisprudência
Impostos
Consumo de Álcool por Menores/estatística & dados numéricos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180205
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180205
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/00952990.2017.1316986


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[PMID]:27776267
[Au] Autor:Boyle SC; Earle AM; LaBrie JW; Ballou K
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA 90045, United States.
[Ti] Título:Facebook dethroned: Revealing the more likely social media destinations for college students' depictions of underage drinking.
[So] Source:Addict Behav;65:63-67, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6327
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Studies examining representations of college drinking on social media have almost exclusively focused on Facebook. However, recent research suggests college students may be more influenced by peers' alcohol-related posts on Instagram and Snapchat, two image-based platforms popular among this demographic. One potential explanation for this differential influence is that qualitative distinctions in the types of alcohol-related content posted by students on these three platforms may exist. Informed by undergraduate focus groups, this study examined the hypothesis that, of the three platforms, students tend to use Instagram most often for photos glamourizing drinking and Snapchat for incriminating photos of alcohol misuse and negative consequences. Undergraduate research assistants aided investigators in developing hypothetical vignettes and photographic examples of posts both glamorizing and depicting negative consequences associated with college drinking. In an online survey, vignette and photo stimuli were followed by counterbalanced paired comparisons that presented each possible pair of social media platforms. Undergraduates (N=196) selected the platform from each pair on which they would be more likely to see each post. Generalized Bradley-Terry models examined the probabilities of platform selections. As predicted, Instagram was seen as the most probable destination (and Facebook least probable) for photos depicting alcohol use as attractive and glamorous. Conversely, Snapchat was selected as the most probable destination (and Facebook least probable) for items depicting negative consequences associated with heavy drinking. Results suggest researchers aiming to mitigate the potential influences associated with college students' glamorous and consequential alcohol-related photos posted social media posts should shift their focus from Facebook to Instagram and Snapchat.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Álcool na Faculdade
Mídias Sociais/estatística & dados numéricos
Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos
Consumo de Álcool por Menores/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Inquéritos e Questionários
Universidades
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180201
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180201
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28957368
[Au] Autor:Willmore J; Marko TL; Taing D; Sampasa-Kanyinga H
[Ad] Endereço:Ottawa Public Health, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
[Ti] Título:The burden of alcohol-related morbidity and mortality in Ottawa, Canada.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(9):e0185457, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: Alcohol-related morbidity and mortality are significant public health issues. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and trends over time of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related morbidity and mortality; and public attitudes of alcohol use impacts on families and the community in Ottawa, Canada. METHODS: Prevalence (2013-2014) and trends (2000-2001 to 2013-2014) of alcohol use were obtained from the Canadian Community Health Survey. Data on paramedic responses (2015), emergency department (ED) visits (2013-2015), hospitalizations (2013-2015) and deaths (2007-2011) were used to quantify the acute and chronic health effects of alcohol in Ottawa. Qualitative data were obtained from the "Have Your Say" alcohol survey, an online survey of public attitudes on alcohol conducted in 2016. RESULTS: In 2013-2014, an estimated 595,300 (83%) Ottawa adults 19 years and older drank alcohol, 42% reported binge drinking in the past year. Heavy drinking increased from 15% in 2000-2001 to 20% in 2013-2014. In 2015, the Ottawa Paramedic Service responded to 2,060 calls directly attributable to alcohol. Between 2013 and 2015, there were an average of 6,100 ED visits and 1,270 hospitalizations per year due to alcohol. Annually, alcohol use results in at least 140 deaths in Ottawa. Men have higher rates of alcohol-attributable paramedic responses, ED visits, hospitalizations and deaths than women, and young adults have higher rates of alcohol-attributable paramedic responses. Qualitative data of public attitudes indicate that alcohol misuse has greater repercussions not only on those who drink, but also on the family and community. CONCLUSIONS: Results highlight the need for healthy public policy intended to encourage a culture of drinking in moderation in Ottawa to support lower risk alcohol use, particularly among men and young adults.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Alcoolismo/mortalidade
Efeitos Psicossociais da Doença
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Atitude
Bebedeira/epidemiologia
Canadá/epidemiologia
Cultura
Demografia
Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência
Feminino
Geografia
Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Morbidade
Fatores de Risco
Consumo de Álcool por Menores/estatística & dados numéricos
Violência/estatística & dados numéricos
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171018
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171018
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170929
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0185457


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Texto completo SciELO Brasil
Texto completo SciELO Saúde Pública
[PMID]:28792994
[Au] Autor:Suárez-Relinque C; Arroyo GDM; Ferrer BM; Ochoa GM
[Ad] Endereço:Universidad Pablo de Olavide de Sevilla, Sevilla, España.
[Ti] Título:[Spanish adolescents' low perception of risk in alcohol consumption].
[Ti] Título:Baja percepción de riesgo en el consumo de alcohol en adolescentes españoles..
[So] Source:Cad Saude Publica;33(7):e00129716, 2017 Aug 07.
[Is] ISSN:1678-4464
[Cp] País de publicação:Brazil
[La] Idioma:spa
[Ab] Resumo:According to recent studies, Spanish adolescents show low perception of risk in alcohol consumption. The current study aims to analyze the factors that favor this low perception based on the opinion of a group of 32 professional experts on adolescence, family, school, mass media, and local policies. A qualitative methodology was used, based on Grounded Theory, using information from 5 focus groups guided by semi-structured interviews. Twelve factors or subcategories were identified, grouped in 4 general categories: short-term risk, immediacy, and perception of invulnerability ("adolescent thinking" category); benevolent view of alcohol, normalization of consumption, and alcohol-entertainment binomial ("social norms" category); parents' habitual consumption, verbal/non-verbal inconsistency in parental model, risk-free consumption depicted in the mass media, consumption with positive results in the media ("social models" category); and excessive health content, long-term risk ("preventive discourse" category). After discussing the results in the context of the current scientific literature, the article offers various proposals for increasing risk perception in adolescents: stronger impact of contents on short-term risks of alcohol; educational strategies targeted to adolescents to include agents of socialization, especially parents; and policies centered on the substance and reduction of supply.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Grupos Focais/métodos
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Assunção de Riscos
Consumo de Álcool por Menores/prevenção & controle
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Fatores Etários
Família
Feminino
Teoria Fundamentada
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Percepção
Pesquisa Qualitativa
Medição de Risco
Fatores de Risco
Meio Social
Normas Sociais
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Espanha
Especialização
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171011
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171011
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170810
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28599649
[Au] Autor:Chan GCK; Leung J; Connor J; Hall W; Kelly AB
[Ad] Endereço:Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research, The University of Queensland, QLD, Brisbane, 4072, Australia. c.chan4@uq.edu.au.
[Ti] Título:Parental supply of alcohol and adolescent drinking: a multilevel analysis of nationally representative data.
[So] Source:BMC Public Health;17(1):560, 2017 Jun 09.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2458
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Existing research on parental supply of alcohol analyses the effects of self-reported parental supply on adolescent drinking using individual level data. This study examined the contextual effect of parental supply of alcohol on adolescent alcohol use by examining the association between the prevalence of parental supply in each Australian state and adolescent alcohol use using a multilevel analytic framework. METHODS: Adolescent samples (Age: 12-17) were drawn from the four National Drug Strategy Household Surveys (2004, 2007, 2010 and 2013; N = 6803). The prevalence of parental supply of alcohol, defined as the weighted percentage of sample who reported obtaining alcohol from their parents, was estimated in each state and territory across the four surveys. Three multilevel logistic regressions were used to examine the contextual effects of parental supply prevalence on adolescents' alcohol use in the past 12 months, weekly drinking and heavy drinking. RESULTS: Overall, adolescents' rates of past 12 months alcohol use, heavy drinking and weekly drinking between 2004 and 2013 were 40.1, 14.4 and 6.4% respectively. The prevalence of parental supply was significantly associated with past 12 months alcohol use (OR = 1.06, p < .001) and heavy drinking (OR = 1.04, p < .001) but not with weekly drinking (OR = 1.03, p = .189). The results were adjusted for gender, age, socio-economic index for area, place of birth, survey year and prevalence of peer supply. CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of parental supply in a region was associated with heavier adolescent drinking, regardless of whether adolescents primarily obtained their alcohol from their own parents.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/psicologia
Bebidas Alcoólicas/provisão & distribuição
Menores de Idade/psicologia
Relações Pais-Filho
Pais/psicologia
Consumo de Álcool por Menores/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia
Austrália/epidemiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Modelos Logísticos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Análise Multinível
Inquéritos e Questionários
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171113
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171113
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170611
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12889-017-4472-8


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[PMID]:28579252
[Au] Autor:Ojeda ML; Carreras O; Sobrino P; Murillo ML; Nogales F
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Seville University, 41012 Seville, Spain.
[Ti] Título:Biological implications of selenium in adolescent rats exposed to binge drinking: Oxidative, immunologic and apoptotic balance.
[So] Source:Toxicol Appl Pharmacol;329:165-172, 2017 Aug 15.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0333
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Alcohol intermittent binge drinking (BD) during adolescence decreases the levels of selenium (Se), a trace element that plays a key biological role against oxidative damage in hepatocytes through different selenoproteins such as the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidases (GPx1 and Gpx4) and selenoprotein P (SelP). In this context, it has been found that GPx4 has an essential antioxidant role in mitochondria modulating the apoptosis and NF-kB activation (a factor intimately related to apoptosis and immune function). To further investigate the effectiveness of selenium supplementation in oxidative balance, inflammation and apoptosis, the present study examined the protective effects of 0.4ppm of dietary selenite administrated to adolescent rats exposed to BD. BD consumption depleted Se deposits in all the tissues studied. In liver, GPx1 activity and expression were decreased leading to protein and lipid hepatic oxidation. Moreover GPx4 and NF-kB expression were also decreased in liver, coinciding with an increase in caspase-3 expression. This hepatic profile caused general liver damage as shown the increased serum transaminases ratio AST/ALT. Proinflammatory serum citokines and chemocines were decreased. Se supplementation therapy used restored all these values, even AST levels. These findings suggest for first time that Se supplementation is a good strategy against BD liver damage during adolescence, since it increases GPx1 and GPx4 expression and avoids NF-kB downregulation and caspase-3 upregulation, leading to a better oxidative, inflammatory and apoptotic liver profile. The therapy proposed could be considered to have a great biological efficacy and to be suitable for BD exposed teenagers in order to avoid future hepatic complications.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Antioxidantes/farmacologia
Apoptose/efeitos dos fármacos
Bebedeira/tratamento farmacológico
Suplementos Nutricionais
Hepatopatias Alcoólicas/prevenção & controle
Fígado/efeitos dos fármacos
Estresse Oxidativo/efeitos dos fármacos
Selenito de Sódio/farmacologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Fatores Etários
Alanina Transaminase/sangue
Animais
Anti-Inflamatórios/farmacologia
Aspartato Aminotransferases/sangue
Bebedeira/sangue
Bebedeira/imunologia
Bebedeira/patologia
Caspase 3/metabolismo
Citocinas/sangue
Citoproteção
Modelos Animais de Doenças
Glutationa Peroxidase/metabolismo
Seres Humanos
Mediadores da Inflamação/sangue
Fígado/imunologia
Fígado/metabolismo
Fígado/patologia
Hepatopatias Alcoólicas/sangue
Hepatopatias Alcoólicas/imunologia
Hepatopatias Alcoólicas/patologia
Masculino
Ratos Wistar
Selenoproteínas/metabolismo
Transdução de Sinais/efeitos dos fármacos
Fator de Transcrição RelA/metabolismo
Consumo de Álcool por Menores
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents); 0 (Antioxidants); 0 (Cytokines); 0 (Inflammation Mediators); 0 (Rela protein, rat); 0 (Selenoproteins); 0 (Transcription Factor RelA); EC 1.11.1.- (glutathione peroxidase GPX1); EC 1.11.1.9 (Glutathione Peroxidase); EC 1.11.1.9 (glutathione peroxidase 4, rat); EC 2.6.1.1 (Aspartate Aminotransferases); EC 2.6.1.2 (Alanine Transaminase); EC 3.4.22.- (Casp3 protein, rat); EC 3.4.22.- (Caspase 3); HIW548RQ3W (Sodium Selenite)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170731
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170731
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170606
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28562297
[Au] Autor:Welsh JW; Knight JR; Hadland SE
[Ad] Endereço:Emory Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment Services, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia; justine.welsh@emory.edu.
[Ti] Título:Adolescent Frequent Heavy Drinking From 1991-2015.
[So] Source:Pediatrics;139(6), 2017 06.
[Is] ISSN:1098-4275
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas
Consumo de Álcool por Menores
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; COMMENT
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171113
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171113
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170601
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28494414
[Au] Autor:Walsh K; Moreland AM; Hanson RF; Resnick HS; Saunders BE; Kilpatrick DG
[Ad] Endereço:Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, United States. Electronic address: kate.walsh@einstein.yu.edu.
[Ti] Título:Relationship violence victimization and binge drinking trajectories among a nationally representative sample of adolescents.
[So] Source:J Adolesc;58:49-55, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9254
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The present study evaluated the impact of relationship violence (RV) victimization on the longitudinal trajectory of binge drinking (BD) among 3614 US adolescents (51.2% male) who participated in an initial telephone interview regarding physical and sexual RV victimization and binge drinking. Two follow-up phone interviews were completed over approximately three years. Multilevel modeling revealed small, but significant, increases in BD over time; older adolescents and those who had ever experienced RV victimization were more likely to report BD at Wave 1 compared to younger adolescents and non-victims. Although new RV victimization reported during the study predicted an increase in the likelihood of BD at that occasion, those who had ever experienced RV victimization were less likely to report BD over time compared to non-victims. Contrary to expectations, no sex differences emerged. Findings indicate that BD may precede RV. Interventions to reduce alcohol-related RV may be especially useful in this population.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Bebedeira/epidemiologia
Vítimas de Crime/estatística & dados numéricos
Violência por Parceiro Íntimo/estatística & dados numéricos
Consumo de Álcool por Menores/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Vítimas de Crime/psicologia
Estudos Transversais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Violência por Parceiro Íntimo/psicologia
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Inquéritos e Questionários
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170926
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170926
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170512
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28493857
[Au] Autor:Esser MB; Clayton H; Demissie Z; Kanny D; Brewer RD
[Ti] Título:Current and Binge Drinking Among High School Students - United States, 1991-2015.
[So] Source:MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep;66(18):474-478, 2017 May 12.
[Is] ISSN:1545-861X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Excessive drinking accounted for approximately 4,300 deaths each year among persons aged <21 years during 2006-2010,* and underage drinking cost the United States $24.3 billion in 2010 (1). CDC analyzed data from the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) for the years 1991-2015 to examine trends in drinking by U.S. high school students, and from the 2015 YRBS to assess the usual source of alcohol consumed and binge drinking intensity (i.e., the average number of drinks consumed per binge drinking occasion). During 1991-2007, the prevalence of current drinking among high school students declined significantly, from 50.8% (1991) to 44.7% (2007), and then significantly declined to 32.8% in 2015. The prevalence of binge drinking** increased from 31.3% in 1991 to 31.5% in 1999, and then significantly declined to 17.7% in 2015. Most high school students who drank were binge drinkers (57.8%), and 43.8% of binge drinkers consumed eight or more drinks in a row. Despite progress, current drinking and binge drinking are common among high school students, and many students who binge drink do so at high intensity (i.e., eight or more drinks in a row). Widespread use of evidence-based strategies for preventing excessive drinking (e.g., increasing alcohol taxes, regulating alcohol outlet density, and having commercial host liability laws) could help reduce underage drinking and related harms. .
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Bebedeira/epidemiologia
Estudantes/psicologia
Consumo de Álcool por Menores/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Estudos Transversais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Prevalência
Assunção de Riscos
Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos
Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170516
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170516
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170512
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.15585/mmwr.mm6618a4


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[PMID]:28438195
[Au] Autor:Stead M; Parkes T; Nicoll A; Wilson S; Burgess C; Eadie D; Fitzgerald N; McKell J; Reid G; Jepson R; McAteer J; Bauld L
[Ad] Endereço:Institute for Social Marketing, Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK. martine.stead@stir.ac.uk.
[Ti] Título:Delivery of alcohol brief interventions in community-based youth work settings: exploring feasibility and acceptability in a qualitative study.
[So] Source:BMC Public Health;17(1):357, 2017 Apr 24.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2458
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Alcohol Brief Interventions (ABIs) are increasingly being delivered in community-based youth work settings. However, little attention has been paid to how they are being implemented in such settings, or to their feasibility and acceptability for practitioners or young people. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the context, feasibility and acceptability of ABI delivery in youth work projects across Scotland. METHODS: Individual, paired and group interviews were conducted with practitioners and young people in nine community projects that were either involved in the delivery of ABIs or were considering doing so in the near future. A thematic analysis approach was used to analyse data. RESULTS: ABIs were delivered in a diverse range of youth work settings including the side of football pitches, on the streets as part of outreach activities, and in sexual health drop-in centres for young people. ABI delivery differed in a number of important ways from delivery in other health settings such as primary care, particularly in being largely opportunistic and flexible in nature. ABIs were adapted by staff in line with the ethos of their project and their own roles, and to avoid jeopardising their relationships with young people. Young people reacted positively to the idea of having conversations about alcohol with youth project workers, but confirmed practitioners' views about the importance of these conversations taking place in the context of an existing trusting relationship. CONCLUSION: ABIs were feasible in a range of youth work settings with some adaptation. Acceptability to staff was strongly influenced by perceived benefits, and the extent to which ABIs fitted with their project's ethos. Young people were largely comfortable with such conversations. Future implementation efforts should be based on detailed consideration of current practice and contexts. Flexible models of delivery, where professional judgement can be exercised over defined but adaptable content, may be better appreciated by staff and encourage further development of ABI activity.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/prevenção & controle
Serviços de Saúde Comunitária/organização & administração
Educação em Saúde/organização & administração
Local de Trabalho
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Criança
Comunicação
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Entrevistas como Assunto
Masculino
Atenção Primária à Saúde/organização & administração
Pesquisa Qualitativa
Escócia
Consumo de Álcool por Menores/prevenção & controle
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170927
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170927
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170426
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12889-017-4256-1



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