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  1 / 3772 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28747480
[Au] Autor:Votier SC; Fayet AL; Bearhop S; Bodey TW; Clark BL; Grecian J; Guilford T; Hamer KC; Jeglinski JWE; Morgan G; Wakefield E; Patrick SC
[Ad] Endereço:Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn Campus, Cornwall TR10 9EZ, UK s.c.votier@exeter.ac.uk.
[Ti] Título:Effects of age and reproductive status on individual foraging site fidelity in a long-lived marine predator.
[So] Source:Proc Biol Sci;284(1859), 2017 Jul 26.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2954
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Individual foraging specializations, where individuals use a small component of the population niche width, are widespread in nature with important ecological and evolutionary implications. In long-lived animals, foraging ability develops with age, but we know little about the ontogeny of individuality in foraging. Here we use precision global positioning system (GPS) loggers to examine how individual foraging site fidelity (IFSF), a common component of foraging specialization, varies between breeders, failed breeders and immatures in a long-lived marine predator-the northern gannet Breeders (aged 5+) showed strong IFSF: they had similar routes and were faithful to distal points during successive trips. However, centrally placed immatures (aged 2-3) were far more exploratory and lacked route or foraging site fidelity. Failed breeders were intermediate: some with strong fidelity, others being more exploratory. Individual foraging specializations were previously thought to arise as a function of heritable phenotypic differences or via social transmission. Our results instead suggest a third alternative-in long-lived species foraging sites are learned during exploratory behaviours early in life, which become canalized with age and experience, and refined where possible-the exploration-refinement foraging hypothesis. We speculate similar patterns may be present in other long-lived species and moreover that long periods of immaturity may be a consequence of such memory-based individual foraging strategies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fatores Etários
Comportamento Apetitivo
Aves/fisiologia
Reprodução
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ecologia
Comportamento Alimentar
Sistemas de Informação Geográfica
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180202
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180202
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 3772 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29194457
[Au] Autor:Jacob V; Monsempès C; Rospars JP; Masson JB; Lucas P
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, INRA, route de St Cyr, Versailles, France.
[Ti] Título:Olfactory coding in the turbulent realm.
[So] Source:PLoS Comput Biol;13(12):e1005870, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7358
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Long-distance olfactory search behaviors depend on odor detection dynamics. Due to turbulence, olfactory signals travel as bursts of variable concentration and spacing and are characterized by long-tail distributions of odor/no-odor events, challenging the computing capacities of olfactory systems. How animals encode complex olfactory scenes to track the plume far from the source remains unclear. Here we focus on the coding of the plume temporal dynamics in moths. We compare responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs) to sequences of pheromone stimuli either with white-noise patterns or with realistic turbulent temporal structures simulating a large range of distances (8 to 64 m) from the odor source. For the first time, we analyze what information is extracted by the olfactory system at large distances from the source. Neuronal responses are analyzed using linear-nonlinear models fitted with white-noise stimuli and used for predicting responses to turbulent stimuli. We found that neuronal firing rate is less correlated with the dynamic odor time course when distance to the source increases because of improper coding during long odor and no-odor events that characterize large distances. Rapid adaptation during long puffs does not preclude however the detection of puff transitions in PNs. Individual PNs but not individual ORNs encode the onset and offset of odor puffs for any temporal structure of stimuli. A higher spontaneous firing rate coupled to an inhibition phase at the end of PN responses contributes to this coding property. This allows PNs to decode the temporal structure of the odor plume at any distance to the source, an essential piece of information moths can use in their tracking behavior.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Apetitivo/fisiologia
Antenas de Artrópodes/fisiologia
Condutos Olfatórios/fisiologia
Neurônios Receptores Olfatórios/fisiologia
Feromônios/metabolismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antenas de Artrópodes/citologia
Biologia Computacional/métodos
Masculino
Mariposas/fisiologia
Neurônios Receptores Olfatórios/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Pheromones)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180102
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180102
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005870


  3 / 3772 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28972973
[Au] Autor:Wosniack ME; Santos MC; Raposo EP; Viswanathan GM; da Luz MGE
[Ad] Endereço:Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba-PR, Brazil.
[Ti] Título:The evolutionary origins of Lévy walk foraging.
[So] Source:PLoS Comput Biol;13(10):e1005774, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7358
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We study through a reaction-diffusion algorithm the influence of landscape diversity on the efficiency of search dynamics. Remarkably, the identical optimal search strategy arises in a wide variety of environments, provided the target density is sparse and the searcher's information is restricted to its close vicinity. Our results strongly impact the current debate on the emergentist vs. evolutionary origins of animal foraging. The inherent character of the optimal solution (i.e., independent on the landscape for the broad scenarios assumed here) suggests an interpretation favoring the evolutionary view, as originally implied by the Lévy flight foraging hypothesis. The latter states that, under conditions of scarcity of information and sparse resources, some organisms must have evolved to exploit optimal strategies characterized by heavy-tailed truncated power-law distributions of move lengths. These results strongly suggest that Lévy strategies-and hence the selection pressure for the relevant adaptations-are robust with respect to large changes in habitat. In contrast, the usual emergentist explanation seems not able to explain how very similar Lévy walks can emerge from all the distinct non-Lévy foraging strategies that are needed for the observed large variety of specific environments. We also report that deviations from Lévy can take place in plentiful ecosystems, where locomotion truncation is very frequent due to high encounter rates. So, in this case normal diffusion strategies-performing as effectively as the optimal one-can naturally emerge from Lévy. Our results constitute the strongest theoretical evidence to date supporting the evolutionary origins of experimentally observed Lévy walks.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Apetitivo/fisiologia
Evolução Biológica
Modelos Biológicos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Algoritmos
Animais
Biologia Computacional
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171031
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171031
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171004
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005774


  4 / 3772 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28961245
[Au] Autor:Sanda P; Skorheim S; Bazhenov M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Multi-layer network utilizing rewarded spike time dependent plasticity to learn a foraging task.
[So] Source:PLoS Comput Biol;13(9):e1005705, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7358
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Neural networks with a single plastic layer employing reward modulated spike time dependent plasticity (STDP) are capable of learning simple foraging tasks. Here we demonstrate advanced pattern discrimination and continuous learning in a network of spiking neurons with multiple plastic layers. The network utilized both reward modulated and non-reward modulated STDP and implemented multiple mechanisms for homeostatic regulation of synaptic efficacy, including heterosynaptic plasticity, gain control, output balancing, activity normalization of rewarded STDP and hard limits on synaptic strength. We found that addition of a hidden layer of neurons employing non-rewarded STDP created neurons that responded to the specific combinations of inputs and thus performed basic classification of the input patterns. When combined with a following layer of neurons implementing rewarded STDP, the network was able to learn, despite the absence of labeled training data, discrimination between rewarding patterns and the patterns designated as punishing. Synaptic noise allowed for trial-and-error learning that helped to identify the goal-oriented strategies which were effective in task solving. The study predicts a critical set of properties of the spiking neuronal network with STDP that was sufficient to solve a complex foraging task involving pattern classification and decision making.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Potenciais de Ação/fisiologia
Comportamento Apetitivo/fisiologia
Modelos Neurológicos
Redes Neurais (Computação)
Plasticidade Neuronal/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Algoritmos
Animais
Biologia Computacional
Retroalimentação
Seres Humanos
Aprendizado de Máquina
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171031
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171031
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170930
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005705


  5 / 3772 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28575078
[Au] Autor:Poli CL; Harrison AL; Vallarino A; Gerard PD; Jodice PGR
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Forestry and Environmental Conservation, and South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Dynamic oceanography determines fine scale foraging behavior of Masked Boobies in the Gulf of Mexico.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(6):e0178318, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:During breeding, foraging marine birds are under biological, geographic, and temporal constraints. These contraints require foraging birds to efficiently process environmental cues derived from physical habitat features that occur at nested spatial scales. Mesoscale oceanography in particular may change rapidly within and between breeding seasons, and findings from well-studied systems that relate oceanography to seabird foraging may transfer poorly to regions with substantially different oceanographic conditions. Our objective was to examine foraging behavior of a pan-tropical seabird, the Masked Booby (Sula dactylatra), in the understudied Caribbean province, a moderately productive region driven by highly dynamic currents and fronts. We tracked 135 individuals with GPS units during May 2013, November 2013, and December 2014 at a regionally important breeding colony in the southern Gulf of Mexico. We measured foraging behavior using characteristics of foraging trips and used area restricted search as a proxy for foraging events. Among individual attributes, nest stage contributed to differences in foraging behavior whereas sex did not. Birds searched for prey at nested hierarchical scales ranging from 200 m-35 km. Large-scale coastal and shelf-slope fronts shifted position between sampling periods and overlapped geographically with overall foraging locations. At small scales (at the prey patch level), the specific relationship between environmental variables and foraging behavior was highly variable among individuals but general patterns emerged. Sea surface height anomaly and velocity of water were the strongest predictors of area restricted search behavior in random forest models, a finding that is consistent with the characterization of the Gulf of Mexico as an energetic system strongly influenced by currents and eddies. Our data may be combined with tracking efforts in the Caribbean province and across tropical regions to advance understanding of seabird sensing of the environment and serve as a baseline for anthropogenic based threats such as development, pollution, and commercial fisheries.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Apetitivo
Aves
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Aves/fisiologia
Cruzamento
Região do Caribe
Ecossistema
Comportamento Alimentar
Feminino
Golfo do México
Masculino
Comportamento de Nidação
Oceanografia
Estações do Ano
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170915
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170915
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170603
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0178318


  6 / 3772 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28521127
[Au] Autor:Bocchio M; Nabavi S; Capogna M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Pharmacology, University of Oxford, Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TH, UK; INMED, INSERM U901, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13273 Marseille, France.
[Ti] Título:Synaptic Plasticity, Engrams, and Network Oscillations in Amygdala Circuits for Storage and Retrieval of Emotional Memories.
[So] Source:Neuron;94(4):731-743, 2017 May 17.
[Is] ISSN:1097-4199
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The neuronal circuits of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) are crucial for acquisition, consolidation, retrieval, and extinction of associative emotional memories. Synaptic plasticity in BLA neurons is essential for associative emotional learning and is a candidate mechanism through which subsets of BLA neurons (commonly termed "engram") are recruited during learning and reactivated during memory retrieval. In parallel, synchronous oscillations in the theta and gamma bands between the BLA and interconnected structures have been shown to occur during consolidation and retrieval of emotional memories. Understanding how these cellular and network phenomena interact is vital to decipher the roles of emotional memory formation and storage in the healthy and pathological brain. Here, we review data on synaptic plasticity, engrams, and network oscillations in the rodent BLA. We explore mechanisms through which synaptic plasticity, engrams, and long-range synchrony might be interconnected.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia
Aprendizagem por Associação/fisiologia
Ondas Encefálicas/fisiologia
Condicionamento (Psicologia)/fisiologia
Emoções/fisiologia
Memória/fisiologia
Plasticidade Neuronal/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Apetitivo
Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala/fisiologia
Córtex Cerebral/fisiologia
Ritmo Delta/fisiologia
Medo/fisiologia
Ritmo Gama/fisiologia
Seres Humanos
Potenciação de Longa Duração/fisiologia
Rememoração Mental
Rede Nervosa
Vias Neurais
Tálamo/fisiologia
Ritmo Teta/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170724
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170724
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170519
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 3772 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28416630
[Au] Autor:Paisios E; Rjosk A; Pamir E; Schleyer M
[Ad] Endereço:Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology (LIN), Department of Genetics of Learning and Memory, 39118 Magdeburg, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Common microbehavioral "footprint" of two distinct classes of conditioned aversion.
[So] Source:Learn Mem;24(5):191-198, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1549-5485
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Avoiding unfavorable situations is a vital skill and a constant task for any animal. Situations can be unfavorable because they feature something that the animal wants to escape from, or because they do not feature something that it seeks to obtain. We investigate whether the microbehavioral mechanisms by which these two classes of aversion come about are shared or distinct. We find that larval avoid odors either previously associated with a punishment, or previously associated with the lack of a reward. These two classes of conditioned aversion are found to be strikingly alike at the microbehavioral level. In both cases larvae show more head casts when oriented toward the odor source than when oriented away, and direct fewer of their head casts toward the odor than away when oriented obliquely to it. Thus, conditioned aversion serving two qualitatively different functions-escape from a punishment or search for a reward-is implemented by the modulation of the same microbehavioral features. These features also underlie conditioned approach, albeit with opposite sign. That is, the larvae show conditioned approach toward odors previously associated with a reward, or with the lack of a punishment. In order to accomplish both these classes of conditioned approach the larvae show fewer head casts when oriented toward an odor, and direct more of their head casts toward it when they are headed obliquely. Given that the larva is a genetically tractable model organism that is well suited to study simple circuits at the single-cell level, these analyses can guide future research into the neuronal circuits underlying conditioned approach and aversion, and the computational principles of conditioned search and escape.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aprendizagem por Associação/fisiologia
Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Condicionamento Clássico/fisiologia
Punição
Recompensa
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Apetitivo
Aprendizagem da Esquiva
Drosophila melanogaster
Larva
Locomoção
Odorantes
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170825
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170825
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170419
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1101/lm.045062.117


  8 / 3772 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28394910
[Au] Autor:Reiley BM; Benson TJ; Everitts J; Bednarz JC
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biological Sciences, Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, Arkansas, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Does flooding effect the apparent survival and body condition of a ground foraging migrant passerine?
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(4):e0175179, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Natural disturbances play a fundamental role in maintaining habitat and landscape heterogeneity; however, these events can also have negative effects on some species. While we know that disturbances can reduce habitat quality for many species, leading to diminished populations and altered community structure, the effect of these events on individuals that continue to occupy affected areas remains unknown. We focused on understanding the impact of flood-mediated reduction of habitat quality on Swainson's Warblers (Limnothlypis swainsonii). In 2008, a catastrophic flood event occurred on the Mississippi River and its tributaries, severely affecting one of two locations where we had studied territorial males since 2004. To determine the impact of flooding on this species, we evaluated how body condition and apparent survival of males differed between locations and in pre-flood (2004-2007) and post-flood (2008-2010) periods. Body condition did not differ between locations after the flood, suggesting that flooding did not cause food limitation for this obligate ground forager. Apparent survival in the post-flood period was lower at both locations and led to near population extirpation at the heavily flood-impacted site. Overall, this study demonstrates the vulnerability of species to extreme hydrological events, an increasing threat due to climate change. Future research should focus on identifying species that are vulnerable to these events and determining appropriate conservation strategies. Conservation for the Swainson's Warbler should focus on identifying and conserving the highest elevation, least flood prone areas within bottomland hardwood forests and managing those areas for thick understory vegetation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Apetitivo
Inundações
Aves Canoras/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Tamanho Corporal
Peso Corporal
Florestas
Modelos Lineares
Masculino
Análise de Componente Principal
Rios
Análise de Sobrevida
Territorialidade
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170830
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170830
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170411
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0175179


  9 / 3772 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28379320
[Au] Autor:Lundin O; Ward KL; Artz DR; Boyle NK; Pitts-Singer TL; Williams NM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 ( ola.lundin@slu.se ; kward@ucdavis.edu ; nmwilliams@ucdavis.edu ).
[Ti] Título:Wildflower Plantings Do Not Compete With Neighboring Almond Orchards for Pollinator Visits.
[So] Source:Environ Entomol;46(3):559-564, 2017 06 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2936
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The engineering of flowering agricultural field borders has emerged as a research and policy priority to mitigate threats to pollinators. Studies have, however, rarely addressed the potential that flowering field borders might compete with neighboring crops for pollinator visits if they both are in bloom at the same time, despite this being a concern expressed by growers. We evaluated how wildflower plantings added to orchard borders in a large (512 ha) commercial almond orchard affected honey bee and wild bee visitation to orchard borders and the crop. The study was conducted over two consecutive seasons using three large (0.48 ha) wildflower plantings paired with control orchard borders in a highly simplified agricultural landscape in California. Honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) and wild bee visitation to wildflower plots were at least an order of magnitude higher than to control plots, but increased honey bee visitation to wildflower plots did not lead to any detectable shifts in honey bee visitation to almond flowers in the neighboring orchard. Wild bees were rarely observed visiting almond flowers irrespective of border treatment, indicating a limited short-term potential for augmenting crop pollination using wild bees in highly simplified agricultural landscapes. Although further studies are warranted on bee visitation and crop yield from spatially independent orchards, this study indicates that growers can support bees with alternative forage in almond orchards without risking competition between the wildflower plantings and the crop.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Agricultura/métodos
Abelhas/fisiologia
Polinização
Prunus dulcis
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Apetitivo
California
Produtos Agrícolas/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Flores/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Prunus dulcis/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Estações do Ano
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171126
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171126
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170406
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/ee/nvx052


  10 / 3772 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28334609
[Au] Autor:Kim J; Zhang X; Muralidhar S; LeBlanc SA; Tonegawa S
[Ad] Endereço:RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics at The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Biology and Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Electronic address: joshuak@mit.edu.
[Ti] Título:Basolateral to Central Amygdala Neural Circuits for Appetitive Behaviors.
[So] Source:Neuron;93(6):1464-1479.e5, 2017 Mar 22.
[Is] ISSN:1097-4199
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Basolateral amygdala (BLA) principal cells are capable of driving and antagonizing behaviors of opposing valence. BLA neurons project to the central amygdala (CeA), which also participates in negative and positive behaviors. However, the CeA has primarily been studied as the site for negative behaviors, and the causal role for CeA circuits underlying appetitive behaviors is poorly understood. Here, we identify several genetically distinct populations of CeA neurons that mediate appetitive behaviors and dissect the BLA-to-CeA circuit for appetitive behaviors. Protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 1B BLA pyramidal neurons to dopamine receptor 1 CeA neurons define a pathway for promoting appetitive behaviors, while R-spondin 2 BLA pyramidal neurons to dopamine receptor 2 CeA neurons define a pathway for suppressing appetitive behaviors. These data reveal genetically defined neural circuits in the amygdala that promote and suppress appetitive behaviors analogous to the direct and indirect pathways of the basal ganglia. VIDEO ABSTRACT.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Apetitivo/fisiologia
Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala/fisiologia
Núcleo Central da Amígdala/fisiologia
Neurônios/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Masculino
Camundongos
Camundongos Transgênicos
Inibição Neural/fisiologia
Vias Neurais/metabolismo
Vias Neurais/fisiologia
Neurônios/metabolismo
Proteína Fosfatase 1/metabolismo
Receptores de Dopamina D1/metabolismo
Receptores de Dopamina D1/fisiologia
Trombospondinas/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Drd1a protein, mouse); 0 (RSPO2 protein, mouse); 0 (Receptors, Dopamine D1); 0 (Thrombospondins); EC 3.1.3.16 (Protein Phosphatase 1)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170929
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170929
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170324
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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