Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : F01.145.113.111.600 [Categoria DeCS]
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  1 / 9707 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29414994
[Au] Autor:Saavedra I; Amo L
[Ad] Endereço:Departamento de Ecología Evolutiva, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (CSIC), C/ José Gutiérrez Abascal, Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Título:Insectivorous birds eavesdrop on the pheromones of their prey.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0190415, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Chemical cues play a fundamental role in mate attraction and mate choice. Lepidopteran females, such as the winter moth (Operophtera brumata), emit pheromones to attract males in the reproductive period. However, these chemical cues could also be eavesdropped by predators. To our knowledge, no studies have examined whether birds can detect pheromones of their prey. O. brumata adults are part of the winter diet of some insectivorous tit species, such as the great tit (Parus major) and blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus). We performed a field experiment aimed to disentangle whether insectivorous birds can exploit the pheromones emitted by their prey for prey location. We placed artificial larvae and a dispenser on branches of Pyrenean oak trees (Quercus pyrenaica). In half of the trees we placed an O. brumata pheromone dispenser and in the other half we placed a control dispenser. We measured the predation rate of birds on artificial larvae. Our results show that more trees had larvae with signs of avian predation when they contained an O. brumata pheromone than when they contained a control dispenser. Furthermore, the proportion of artificial larvae with signs of avian predation was greater in trees that contained the pheromone than in control trees. Our results indicate that insectivorous birds can exploit the pheromones emitted by moth females to attract males, as a method of prey detection. These results highlight the potential use of insectivorous birds in the biological control of insect pests.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aves/fisiologia
Insetos
Feromônios/fisiologia
Comportamento Predatório
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Pheromones)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190415


  2 / 9707 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29381766
[Au] Autor:Boyd M; Rosenzweig F; Herron MD
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Analysis of motility in multicellular Chlamydomonas reinhardtii evolved under predation.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0192184, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The advent of multicellularity was a watershed event in the history of life, yet the transition from unicellularity to multicellularity is not well understood. Multicellularity opens up opportunities for innovations in intercellular communication, cooperation, and specialization, which can provide selective advantages under certain ecological conditions. The unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has never had a multicellular ancestor yet it is closely related to the volvocine algae, a clade containing taxa that range from simple unicells to large, specialized multicellular colonies. Simple multicellular structures have been observed to evolve in C. reinhardtii in response to predation or to settling rate-based selection. Structures formed in response to predation consist of individual cells confined within a shared transparent extracellular matrix. Evolved isolates form such structures obligately under culture conditions in which their wild type ancestors do not, indicating that newly-evolved multicellularity is heritable. C. reinhardtii is capable of photosynthesis, and possesses an eyespot and two flagella with which it moves towards or away from light in order to optimize input of radiant energy. Motility contributes to C. reinhardtii fitness because it allows cells or colonies to achieve this optimum. Utilizing phototaxis to assay motility, we determined that newly evolved multicellular strains do not exhibit significant directional movement, even though the flagellae of their constituent unicells are present and active. In C. reinhardtii the first steps towards multicellularity in response to predation appear to result in a trade-off between motility and differential survivorship, a trade-off that must be overcome by further genetic change to ensure long-term success of the new multicellular organism.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Chlamydomonas reinhardtii/fisiologia
Comportamento Predatório
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192184


  3 / 9707 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29029382
[Au] Autor:Barbosa PRR; Oliveira MD; Barros EM; Michaud JP; Torres JB
[Ad] Endereço:Departamento de Agronomia-Entomologia, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Rua Dom Manoel de Medeiros, s/n, Dois Irmãos, Recife, PE 52171-900, Brazil. Electronic address: pagro05@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Differential impacts of six insecticides on a mealybug and its coccinellid predator.
[So] Source:Ecotoxicol Environ Saf;147:963-971, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2414
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Broad-spectrum insecticides may disrupt biological control and cause pest resurgence due to their negative impacts on natural enemies. The preservation of sustainable pest control in agroecosystems requires parallel assessments of insecticide toxicity to target pests and their key natural enemies. In the present study, the leaf dipping method was used to evaluate the relative toxicity of six insecticides to the striped mealybug, Ferrisia dasylirii (Cockerell) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) and its predator, Tenuisvalvae notata (Mulsant) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Three neurotoxic insecticides, lambda-cyhalothrin, methidathion and thiamethoxam, caused complete mortality of both pest and predator when applied at their highest field rates. In contrast, lufenuron, pymetrozine and pyriproxyfen caused moderate mortality of third-instar mealybug nymphs, and exhibited low or no toxicity to either larvae or adults of the lady beetle. At field rates, lufenuron and pymetrozine had negligible effects on prey consumption, development or reproduction of T. notata, but adults failed to emerge from pupae when fourth instar larvae were exposed to pyriproxyfen. In addition, pyriproxyfen caused temporary sterility; T. notata females laid non-viable eggs for three days after exposure, but recovered egg fertility thereafter. Our results indicate that the three neurotoxic insecticides can potentially control F. dasylirii, but are hazardous to its natural predator. In contrast, lufenuron and pymetrozine appear compatible with T. notata, although they appear less effective against the mealybug. Although the acute toxicity of pyriproxyfen to T. notata was low, some pupal mortality and reduced egg fertility suggest that this material could impede the predator's numerical response to mealybug populations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Coleópteros/efeitos dos fármacos
Poluentes Ambientais/toxicidade
Hemípteros/efeitos dos fármacos
Inseticidas/toxicidade
Controle Biológico de Vetores
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Brasil
Coleópteros/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Feminino
Gossypium/parasitologia
Hemípteros/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Inseticidas/farmacologia
Larva/efeitos dos fármacos
Larva/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Ninfa/efeitos dos fármacos
Ninfa/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Comportamento Predatório/efeitos dos fármacos
Pupa/efeitos dos fármacos
Pupa/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Reprodução/efeitos dos fármacos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Environmental Pollutants); 0 (Insecticides)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171015
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  4 / 9707 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29295998
[Au] Autor:Woodson CB; Schramski JR; Joye SB
[Ad] Endereço:School of Environmental, Civil, and Environmental Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602, USA. bwoodson@uga.edu.
[Ti] Título:A unifying theory for top-heavy ecosystem structure in the ocean.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):23, 2018 01 02.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Size generally dictates metabolic requirements, trophic level, and consequently, ecosystem structure, where inefficient energy transfer leads to bottom-heavy ecosystem structure and biomass decreases as individual size (or trophic level) increases. However, many animals deviate from simple size-based predictions by either adopting generalist predatory behavior, or feeding lower in the trophic web than predicted from their size. Here we show that generalist predatory behavior and lower trophic feeding at large body size increase overall biomass and shift ecosystems from a bottom-heavy pyramid to a top-heavy hourglass shape, with the most biomass accounted for by the largest animals. These effects could be especially dramatic in the ocean, where primary producers are the smallest components of the ecosystem. This approach makes it possible to explore and predict, in the past and in the future, the structure of ocean ecosystems without biomass extraction and other impacts.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ecossistema
Peixes/fisiologia
Cadeia Alimentar
Modelos Biológicos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antozoários/classificação
Antozoários/fisiologia
Biomassa
Tamanho Corporal
Comportamento Alimentar/fisiologia
Pesqueiros/estatística & dados numéricos
Pesqueiros/tendências
Peixes/classificação
Oceanos e Mares
Plâncton/classificação
Plâncton/fisiologia
Dinâmica Populacional
Comportamento Predatório/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180306
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180306
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180104
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-02450-y


  5 / 9707 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29446556
[Au] Autor:O'Driscoll CA; Thompson JC
[Ad] Endereço:School of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
[Ti] Título:The origins and early elaboration of projectile technology.
[So] Source:Evol Anthropol;27(1):30-45, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6505
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The ability of Homo sapiens to kill prey at a distance is arguably one of the catalysts for our current ecological dominance. Many researchers have suggested its origins lie in the African Middle Stone Age or the European Middle Palaeolithic (∼300-30 thousand years ago), but the perishable components of armatures rarely preserve. Most research on this subject therefore emphasises analysis of armature tip size, shape, and diagnostic impacts or residues. Other lines of evidence have included human skeletal anatomy or analyses of the species composition of faunal assemblages. Projectile Impact Marks (PIMs) on archaeofaunal remains offer an ideal complement to this work, but their potential has been restricted mainly to the later Eurasian zooarchaeological record. A review of current evidence and approaches shows that systematic PIM research could add much to our understanding of early projectile technology, especially in Africa.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Homem de Neandertal/fisiologia
Comportamento Predatório/fisiologia
Tecnologia/história
Comportamento de Utilização de Ferramentas/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Osso e Ossos/patologia
História Antiga
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/evan.21560


  6 / 9707 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29380883
[Au] Autor:Allan ATL; Hill RA
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Dawson Building, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:What have we been looking at? A call for consistency in studies of primate vigilance.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;165 Suppl 65:4-22, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Vigilance functions to detect threats. In primates, these threats emerge from both predators and conspecifics, but a host of other social, demographic, and ecological factors have been shown to influence primate vigilance patterns. The primate vigilance literature is thus characterized by considerable variation in findings, with inconsistent or contradictory results reported not only across different species but also within species and populations across studies. Some of this variation could emerge from fundamental differences in the methods employed, making comparisons across species and groups challenging. Furthermore, identifying consistent behavioral markers for the state of vigilance appears to have proved challenging in primates, leading to a range of definitions being developed. Deviation at this level leads directly into concomitant variation at the level of sampling methodologies. As a result, the primate vigilance literature currently presents a diverse series of approaches to exploring subtly different behaviors and phenomena. This review calls for a greater consistency in studying vigilance, with the aim of encouraging future research to follow similar principles leading to more comparable results. Identifying whether an animal is in a vigilant state is challenging for most field researchers; identifying and recording a more general behavior of "looking" should though be more achievable. Experimental approaches could then be employed to understand the compatibility "looking" has with predator detection (and other threats) in individual study systems. The outcome of this approach will allow researchers to understand the key determinants of looking in their study groups and explore threat detection probabilities given an individual or group's relative level of looking.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Antropologia Física/métodos
Antropologia Física/normas
Comportamento Predatório/fisiologia
Primatas/fisiologia
Projetos de Pesquisa/normas
Predomínio Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23381


  7 / 9707 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29220518
[Au] Autor:Lin T; You Y; Zeng ZH; Lin S; Chen YX; Cai HJ; Zhao JW; Wei H
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Plant Protection, Fujian Academy of Agriculture Sciences, China.
[Ti] Título:Temperature-Dependent Development of Oligota flavicornis (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) Preying on Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Acarina: Tetranychidae).
[So] Source:J Econ Entomol;110(6):2334-2341, 2017 12 05.
[Is] ISSN:1938-291X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The effect of nine constant temperatures on developmental time of Oligota flavicornis (Boisduval and Lacordaire) preying on Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval) (Acari: Tetranychidae) eggs was determined under laboratory conditions of 75 ± 5% RH and a 16:8 (L:D) h photoperiod. O. flavicornis survival rates were highest between 18 and 30°C, although O. flavicornis eggs developed successfully to adults at 12-32°C, and the developmental durations to adult at the seven temperatures (12, 15, 18, 20, 25, 30, and 32°C) were 114.41, 51.66, 33.45, 23.21, 13.43, 11.54, and 17.18 d, respectively. Two linear and seven nonlinear models (Logan-6 and Logan-10, Taylor, Lactin-1 and Lactin-2, and Brière-1 and Brière-2) were fit to the developmental rates of the immature predatory stages to estimate the thermal constant (K) and critical temperatures. The lower temperature threshold (T0) and K for the immature stages using the common linear model were 9.96°C and 225.73 degree-days and Ikemoto-Takai linear model were 11.01°C and 167.14 degree-days, respectively. The upper temperature threshold values estimated by the Logan-6 and Lactin-1 models were both 34.86°C. The T0 values estimated by the Brière-1 and Brière-2 models were 10.67 and 9.32°C for all immature stages, respectively, and the estimated optimal temperature according to the Brière-2 model was 29.59°C. Therefore, the two linear models and Brière-2 model estimates approximated the actual relationship between the temperature and developmental rate of immature O. flavicornis.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Coleópteros/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Controle Biológico de Vetores
Comportamento Predatório
Tetranychidae
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Coleópteros/fisiologia
Larva/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Larva/fisiologia
Modelos Lineares
Longevidade
Modelos Biológicos
Dinâmica não Linear
Pupa/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Pupa/fisiologia
Temperatura Ambiente
Tetranychidae/crescimento & desenvolvimento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jee/tox259


  8 / 9707 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29247931
[Au] Autor:Behrend JE; Rypstra AL
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA.
[Ti] Título:Contact with a glyphosate-based herbicide has long-term effects on the activity and foraging of an agrobiont wolf spider.
[So] Source:Chemosphere;194:714-721, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1298
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Animals that live in conventional agroecosystems must cope with a variety of anthropogenic chemicals. Most of the focus of toxicology is on lethality, deformities, or short-term shifts in behavior. However, for animals that succeed in spite of their exposure, it is important to determine if long-term changes are brought on by their experience. We tested the hypothesis that contact with a commercial formulation of a glyphosate-based herbicide would affect the behavior of subsequent instars in the wolf spider, Pardosa milvina, a species that thrives in the agroecosystems of eastern United States. In one experiment, we housed females carrying egg sacs on a surface treated with the herbicide for 7 h. Then we monitored their activity and foraging of the offspring 4 weeks after emergence. We repeated the same tests on adults that had been housed with herbicide during their penultimate stage. In both studies, exposed spiders displayed higher levels of activity and greater capture success than their unexposed counterparts. Exposure of penultimate instar to herbicide had larger effects on the behavior of adult males than adult females. These results suggest that herbicides have the potential to adjust the behavior of individuals in the predator community. Thus, impact on the food web and their positive or negative potential for biological control may extend beyond their role in controlling weeds.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal/efeitos dos fármacos
Glicina/análogos & derivados
Herbicidas/farmacologia
Comportamento Predatório/efeitos dos fármacos
Aranhas/efeitos dos fármacos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Cadeia Alimentar
Glicina/farmacologia
Masculino
Aranhas/fisiologia
Tempo
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Herbicides); 4632WW1X5A (glyphosate); TE7660XO1C (Glycine)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180228
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180228
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171217
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 9707 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29370164
[Au] Autor:Butler SR; Fernández-Juricic E
[Ad] Endereço:Purdue University, Department of Biological Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:European starlings use their acute vision to check on feline predators but not on conspecifics.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0188857, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Head movements allow birds with laterally placed eyes to move their centers of acute vision around and align them with objects of interest. Consequently, head movements have been used as indicator of fixation behavior (where gaze is maintained). However, studies on head movement behavior have not elucidated the degree to which birds use high-acuity or low-acuity vision. We studied how European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) used high-acuity vision in the early stages of visual exploration of a stuffed cat (common terrestrial predator), a taxidermy Cooper's hawk (common aerial predator), and a stuffed study skin of a conspecific. We found that starlings tended to use their high acuity vision when looking at predators, particularly, the cat was above chance levels. However, when they viewed a conspecific, they used high acuity vision as expected by chance. We did not observe a preference for the left or right center of acute vision. Our findings suggest that starlings exposed to a predator (particularly cats) may employ selective attention by using high-acuity vision to obtain quickly detailed information useful for a potential escape, but exposed to a social context may use divided attention by allocating similar levels high- and low-quality vision to monitor both conspecifics and the rest of the environment.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Gatos/fisiologia
Comportamento Predatório
Estorninhos/fisiologia
Acuidade Visual
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Movimentos Oculares
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180222
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180222
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180126
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188857


  10 / 9707 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29385167
[Au] Autor:Gaglio D; Cook TR; McInnes A; Sherley RB; Ryan PG
[Ad] Endereço:FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology, DST-NRF Centre of Excellence, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, South Africa.
[Ti] Título:Foraging plasticity in seabirds: A non-invasive study of the diet of greater crested terns breeding in the Benguela region.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190444, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Marine predators, such as seabirds, are useful indicators of marine ecosystem functioning. In particular, seabird diet may reflect variability in food-web composition due to natural or human-induced environmental change. Diet monitoring programmes, which sample diet non-invasively, are valuable aids to conservation and management decision-making. We investigated the diet of an increasing population of greater crested terns Thalasseus bergii in the Western Cape, South Africa, during three successive breeding seasons (2013 to 2015), when populations of other seabirds feeding on small pelagic schooling fish in the region were decreasing. Breeding greater crested terns carry prey in their bills, so we used an intensive photo-sampling method to record their diet with little disturbance. We identified 24,607 prey items from at least 47 different families, with 34 new prey species recorded. Fish dominated the diet, constituting 94% of prey by number, followed by cephalopods (3%), crustaceans (2%) and insects (1%). The terns mainly targeted surface-schooling Clupeiformes, with anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus the most abundant prey in all three breeding seasons (65% overall). Prey composition differed significantly between breeding stages and years, with anchovy most abundant at the start of the breeding season, becoming less frequent as the season progressed. The proportion of anchovy in the diet also was influenced by environmental factors; anchovy occurred more frequently with increasing wind speeds and was scarce on foggy days, presumably because terns rely in part on social facilitation to locate anchovy schools. The application of this intensive and non-invasive photo-sampling method revealed an important degree of foraging plasticity for this seabird within a context of locally reduced food availability, suggesting that, unlike species that specialise on a few high-quality prey, opportunistic seabirds may be better able to cope with reductions in the abundance of their preferred prey.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aves/fisiologia
Cruzamento
Dieta
Comportamento Alimentar
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ecossistema
Comportamento Predatório
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180221
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180221
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190444



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