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Pesquisa : F01.145.113.252.748.400 [Categoria DeCS]
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[PMID]:29364951
[Au] Autor:Puehringer-Sturmayr V; Wascher CAF; Loretto MC; Palme R; Stoewe M; Kotrschal K; Frigerio D
[Ad] Endereço:Core Facility Konrad Lorenz Forschungsstelle for Behaviour and Cognition, University of Vienna, Grünau im Almtal, Austria.
[Ti] Título:Seasonal differences of corticosterone metabolite concentrations and parasite burden in northern bald ibis (Geronticus eremita): The role of affiliative interactions.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191441, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The reproductive season is energetically costly as revealed by elevated glucocorticoid concentrations, constrained immune functions and an increased risk of infections. Social allies and affiliative interactions may buffer physiological stress responses and thereby alleviate associated effects. In the present study, we investigated the seasonal differences of immune reactive corticosterone metabolite concentrations, endoparasite burden (nematode eggs and coccidian oocysts) and affiliative interactions in northern bald ibis (Geronticus eremita), a critically endangered bird. In total, 43 individually marked focal animals from a free-ranging colony were investigated. The analyses included a description of initiated and received affiliative interactions, pair bond status as well as seasonal patterns of hormone and endoparasite levels. During the reproductive season, droppings contained parasite eggs more often and corticosterone metabolite levels were higher as compared to the period after reproduction. The excretion rate of endoparasite products was lower in paired individuals than in unpaired ones, but paired animals exhibited higher corticosterone metabolite concentrations than unpaired individuals. Furthermore, paired individuals initiated affiliative behaviour more frequently than unpaired ones. This suggests that the reproductive season influences the excretion patterns of endoparasite products and corticosterone metabolites and that affiliative interactions between pair partners may positively affect endoparasite burden during periods of elevated glucocorticoid levels. Being embedded in a pair bond may have a positive impact on individual immune system and parasite resistance.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aves/fisiologia
Aves/parasitologia
Corticosterona/metabolismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Aves/imunologia
Coccídios/isolamento & purificação
Coccídios/patogenicidade
Feminino
Masculino
Nematoides/isolamento & purificação
Nematoides/patogenicidade
Oocistos/isolamento & purificação
Oocistos/patogenicidade
Ligação do Par
Contagem de Ovos de Parasitas
Reprodução/fisiologia
Estações do Ano
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
W980KJ009P (Corticosterone)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191441


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[PMID]:28562592
[Au] Autor:Amadei EA; Johnson ZV; Jun Kwon Y; Shpiner AC; Saravanan V; Mays WD; Ryan SJ; Walum H; Rainnie DG; Young LJ; Liu RC
[Ad] Endereço:Silvio O. Conte Center for Oxytocin and Social Cognition, Center for Translational Social Neuroscience, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA.
[Ti] Título:Dynamic corticostriatal activity biases social bonding in monogamous female prairie voles.
[So] Source:Nature;546(7657):297-301, 2017 06 08.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4687
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Adult pair bonding involves dramatic changes in the perception and valuation of another individual. One key change is that partners come to reliably activate the brain's reward system, although the precise neural mechanisms by which partners become rewarding during sociosexual interactions leading to a bond remain unclear. Here we show, using a prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) model of social bonding, how a functional circuit from the medial prefrontal cortex to nucleus accumbens is dynamically modulated to enhance females' affiliative behaviour towards a partner. Individual variation in the strength of this functional connectivity, particularly after the first mating encounter, predicts how quickly animals begin affiliative huddling with their partner. Rhythmically activating this circuit in a social context without mating biases later preference towards a partner, indicating that this circuit's activity is not just correlated with how quickly animals become affiliative but causally accelerates it. These results provide the first dynamic view of corticostriatal activity during bond formation, revealing how social interactions can recruit brain reward systems to drive changes in affiliative behaviour.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Arvicolinae/fisiologia
Arvicolinae/psicologia
Núcleo Accumbens/fisiologia
Ligação do Par
Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia
Recompensa
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Masculino
Preferência de Acasalamento Animal/fisiologia
Núcleo Accumbens/citologia
Córtex Pré-Frontal/citologia
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171019
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171019
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170601
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/nature22381


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[PMID]:28424518
[Au] Autor:Bendesky A; Kwon YM; Lassance JM; Lewarch CL; Yao S; Peterson BK; He MX; Dulac C; Hoekstra HE
[Ad] Endereço:Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.
[Ti] Título:The genetic basis of parental care evolution in monogamous mice.
[So] Source:Nature;544(7651):434-439, 2017 04 27.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4687
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Parental care is essential for the survival of mammals, yet the mechanisms underlying its evolution remain largely unknown. Here we show that two sister species of mice, Peromyscus polionotus and Peromyscus maniculatus, have large and heritable differences in parental behaviour. Using quantitative genetics, we identify 12 genomic regions that affect parental care, 8 of which have sex-specific effects, suggesting that parental care can evolve independently in males and females. Furthermore, some regions affect parental care broadly, whereas others affect specific behaviours, such as nest building. Of the genes linked to differences in nest-building behaviour, vasopressin is differentially expressed in the hypothalamus of the two species, with increased levels associated with less nest building. Using pharmacology in Peromyscus and chemogenetics in Mus, we show that vasopressin inhibits nest building but not other parental behaviours. Together, our results indicate that variation in an ancient neuropeptide contributes to interspecific differences in parental care.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Genoma/genética
Comportamento Materno
Ligação do Par
Comportamento Paterno
Peromyscus/genética
Peromyscus/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Genômica
Hibridização Genética
Hipotálamo/metabolismo
Masculino
Comportamento Materno/efeitos dos fármacos
Camundongos
Comportamento de Nidação/efeitos dos fármacos
Comportamento Paterno/efeitos dos fármacos
Locos de Características Quantitativas/genética
Caracteres Sexuais
Especificidade da Espécie
Vasopressinas/deficiência
Vasopressinas/genética
Vasopressinas/metabolismo
Vasopressinas/farmacologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
11000-17-2 (Vasopressins)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171109
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171109
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170421
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/nature22074


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[PMID]:28412929
[Au] Autor:Apfelbeck B; Mortega KG; Flinks H; Illera JC; Helm B
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, G12 8QQ, UK. bea.apfelbeck@gmx.de.
[Ti] Título:Testosterone, territorial response, and song in seasonally breeding tropical and temperate stonechats.
[So] Source:BMC Evol Biol;17(1):101, 2017 Apr 17.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2148
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Testosterone facilitates physiological, morphological, and behavioral changes required for breeding in male vertebrates. However, testosterone concentrations and the link between its seasonal changes and those in reproductive behaviors vary greatly among species. To better understand the impact of tropical and temperate environments and life history factors on this variation, we have compared testosterone, territorial behavior and song performance across sequential stages of the breeding season in males of 16 closely related taxa of East African tropical and West European temperate stonechats (Saxicola spp), which all breed during a short breeding season, but differ in migratory behavior, seasonal territory-acquisition and pace of life. RESULTS: We found that generally, the profiles of testosterone and territorial behavior were similar across latitudes. African stonechats with a slow pace of life had equally high peak testosterone concentrations and responded as aggressively to an intruder as European stonechats with a fast pace of life. However, song performance at the beginning of the breeding season was lower in African than in European stonechats. The differences in song performance were not associated with variation in testosterone levels between tropical and temperate stonechats. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest a very similar role for testosterone as a mediator of high intensity territorial aggression during the fertile period of females in tropical and temperate stonechats, which all are highly seasonal, locally synchronous breeders. A potential explanation may be high risk of extra-pair copulations which has been associated with synchronous breeding. Interestingly, an association was not consistent for song performance. Our data suggest that song performance can be disassociated from peak testosterone levels depending on its role in breeding behavior. Despite similar testosterone levels, European males, which early in the breeding season acquire territories and mates, showed greater song performance than African stonechats, which maintain year-round territories and pair-bonds. Taken together, our study comparing related taxa of old world songbirds suggests that short breeding seasons may be a major selective force for high peak testosterone levels during breeding regardless of latitude and pace of life, but that particular behaviors, in our case song, can be uncoupled from peak testosterone levels.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aves Canoras/fisiologia
Testosterona/sangue
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: África Oriental
Agressão
Animais
Cruzamento
Europa (Continente)
Feminino
Masculino
Ligação do Par
Estações do Ano
Aves Canoras/sangue
Aves Canoras/classificação
Territorialidade
Vocalização Animal
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
3XMK78S47O (Testosterone)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170509
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170509
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170418
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12862-017-0944-9


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[PMID]:28406977
[Au] Autor:Hyer MM; Glasper ER
[Ad] Endereço:Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Separation increases passive stress-coping behaviors during forced swim and alters hippocampal dendritic morphology in California mice.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(4):e0175713, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Individuals within monogamous species form bonds that may buffer against the negative effects of stress on physiology and behavior. In some species, involuntary termination of the mother-offspring bond results in increased symptoms of negative affect in the mother, suggesting that the parent-offspring bond may be equally as important as the pair bond. To our knowledge, the extent to which affect in paternal rodents is altered by involuntary termination of the father-offspring bond is currently unknown. Here, we investigated to what extent separation and paternal experience alters passive stress-coping behaviors and dendritic morphology in hippocampal subfields of California mice (Peromyscus californicus). Irrespective of paternal experience, separated mice displayed shorter latencies to the first bout of immobility, longer durations of immobility, and more bouts of immobility than control (non-separated) mice. This effect of separation was exacerbated by paternal experience in some measures of behavioral despair-separation from offspring further decreased the latency to immobility and increased bouts of immobility. In the dentate gyrus, separation reduced dendritic spine density regardless of paternal experience. Increased spine density was observed on CA1 basal, but not apical, dendrites following paternal experience. Regardless of offspring presence, fatherhood was associated with reduced apical dendritic spine density in area CA3 of the hippocampus. Separation enhanced complexity of both basal and apical dendrites in CA1, while fatherhood reduced dendritic complexity in this region. Our data suggest that forced dissolution of the pair bond induces passive stress-coping behaviors and contributes to region-specific alterations in hippocampal structure in California mouse males.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Adaptação Psicológica
Espinhas Dendríticas/fisiologia
Estresse Psicológico/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Animal
Feminino
Hipocampo
Masculino
Camundongos
Ligação do Par
Natação
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170504
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170504
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170414
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0175713


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[PMID]:28242440
[Au] Autor:Maninger N; Hinde K; Mendoza SP; Mason WA; Larke RH; Ragen BJ; Jarcho MR; Cherry SR; Rowland DJ; Ferrer E; Bales KL
[Ad] Endereço:California National Primate Research Center, UC-Davis, Davis, CA 95616, United States. Electronic address: nmaninger@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Pair bond formation leads to a sustained increase in global cerebral glucose metabolism in monogamous male titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus).
[So] Source:Neuroscience;348:302-312, 2017 Apr 21.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7544
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Social bonds, especially attachment relationships, are crucial to our health and happiness. However, what we know about the neural substrates of these bonds is almost exclusively limited to rodent models and correlational experiments in humans. Here, we used socially monogamous non-human primates, titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) to experimentally examine changes in regional and global cerebral glucose metabolism (GCGM) during the formation and maintenance of pair bonds. Baseline positron emission tomography (PET) scans were taken of thirteen unpaired male titi monkeys. Seven males were then experimentally paired with females, scanned and compared, after one week, to six age-matched control males. Five of the six control males were then also paired and scanned after one week. Scans were repeated on all males after four months of pairing. PET scans were coregistered with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and region of interest (ROI) analysis was carried out. A primary finding was that paired males showed a significant increase in [ F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in whole brain following one week of pairing, which is maintained out to four months. Dopaminergic, "motivational" areas and those involved in social behavior showed the greatest change in glucose uptake. In contrast, control areas changed only marginally more than GCGM. These findings confirm the large effects of social bonds on GCGM. They also suggest that more studies should examine how social manipulations affect whole-brain FDG uptake, as opposed to assuming that it does not change across condition.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Encéfalo/metabolismo
Glucose/metabolismo
Ligação do Par
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Encéfalo/diagnóstico por imagem
Feminino
Imagem por Ressonância Magnética
Masculino
Pitheciidae
Tomografia por Emissão de Pósitrons
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
IY9XDZ35W2 (Glucose)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170926
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170926
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170301
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28214580
[Au] Autor:Duchemin A; Seelke AM; Simmons TC; Freeman SM; Bales KL
[Ad] Endereço:Psychology Department, University of California - Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
[Ti] Título:Localization of oxytocin receptors in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) neocortex.
[So] Source:Neuroscience;348:201-211, 2017 Apr 21.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7544
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Early experience and social context interact to alter the phenotype of complex social behaviors. These early experiences can also result in alterations to cortical organization and connections. Given the ability of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) to modulate social and reproductive behavior, OT is likely involved in these cortical processes. However, little is known about the distribution of OT and OT receptors (OTR) within the neocortex. Using autoradiographic and neuroanatomical techniques, we characterized the cortical distribution of OT receptors (OTR) in prairie voles, a socially monogamous rodent species. We found that OTR density was low in the primary sensory areas (including primary somatosensory and auditory regions) but was quite high in association regions (including temporal and parietal association areas, and prelimbic regions). In the primary motor area as well as the temporal and parietal association areas, we observed differences in OTR density across cortical layers. Specifically, cortical layers 2/3 and 5 exhibited greater OTR density than layer 4. Our results point to a role for OT in integrating sensory and motor in the prairie vole brain, providing a complementary mechanism for the modulation of social interactions. Given the ability of early social experience and developmental manipulations of OT to affect the brain and behavior, these results suggest a novel mechanism for how OT may influence cortical organization.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Neocórtex/metabolismo
Ligação do Par
Receptores de Ocitocina/metabolismo
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Arvicolinae
Feminino
Masculino
Ocitocina/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Receptors, Oxytocin); 50-56-6 (Oxytocin)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170926
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170926
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170220
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28140374
[Au] Autor:Klibaite U; Berman GJ; Cande J; Stern DL; Shaevitz JW
[Ad] Endereço:Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics and Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:An unsupervised method for quantifying the behavior of paired animals.
[So] Source:Phys Biol;14(1):015006, 2017 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1478-3975
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Behaviors involving the interaction of multiple individuals are complex and frequently crucial for an animal's survival. These interactions, ranging across sensory modalities, length scales, and time scales, are often subtle and difficult to characterize. Contextual effects on the frequency of behaviors become even more difficult to quantify when physical interaction between animals interferes with conventional data analysis, e.g. due to visual occlusion. We introduce a method for quantifying behavior in fruit fly interaction that combines high-throughput video acquisition and tracking of individuals with recent unsupervised methods for capturing an animal's entire behavioral repertoire. We find behavioral differences between solitary flies and those paired with an individual of the opposite sex, identifying specific behaviors that are affected by social and spatial context. Our pipeline allows for a comprehensive description of the interaction between two individuals using unsupervised machine learning methods, and will be used to answer questions about the depth of complexity and variance in fruit fly courtship.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Drosophila melanogaster/fisiologia
Comportamento Sexual Animal
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Animal
Feminino
Aprendizado de Máquina
Masculino
Ligação do Par
Gravação em Vídeo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171017
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171017
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1088/1478-3975/aa5c50


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[PMID]:28115225
[Au] Autor:Finkenwirth C; Burkart JM
[Ad] Endereço:Anthropological Institute and Museum, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address: christa.finkenwirth@uzh.ch.
[Ti] Título:Long-term-stability of relationship structure in family groups of common marmosets, and its link to proactive prosociality.
[So] Source:Physiol Behav;173:79-86, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:1873-507X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Cooperatively breeding, group-living common marmosets show differentiated relationships, where more strongly bonded dyads within a group engage more in affiliative interactions than less strongly bonded ones. Intriguingly, recent results suggest that strong bonds do not only occur between breeding partners but between individuals from any sex or status, and that strong-bond partners exhibit correlated oxytocin fluctuations (dyadic oxytocin synchrony, OTS) over a period of six weeks. To date, it is unclear whether such relationships are stable over time and whether they are also reflected in higher partner-specific proactive prosociality. To assess the long-term stability of the relationship structure of common marmoset family groups, we investigated whether hormonal and behavioral markers of group structure (dyadic OTS, dyadic affiliation, and individual group integration) in common marmoset families remained stable over a period of six months. We collected baseline urinary OT and social behavior of 36 dyads from three family groups in a non-reproductive period (period A), and again six months later, around the birth of new infants (period B). Patterns of dyadic OTS, dyadic affiliation, and individual group integration were consistent between the two study periods. Oxytocin data from a fourth group (10 dyads), collected in two non-reproductive periods separated by a period of more than five years, could replicate this finding. Furthermore, OTS was also correlated with proactive prosociality that was assessed experimentally for 38 dyads during an earlier study. These results suggest that differentiated relationships are stable over time, even between group members other than the breeding pair, and that more strongly bonded partners also show higher levels of proactive prosociality. Future studies are necessary to identify whether these relationships have an adaptive function, perhaps with regard to positive consequences on cooperativeness.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Callithrix/fisiologia
Callithrix/psicologia
Comportamento Cooperativo
Comportamento Materno/fisiologia
Ligação do Par
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Callithrix/urina
Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática
Feminino
Masculino
Modelos Biológicos
Ocitocina/urina
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
50-56-6 (Oxytocin)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170630
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170630
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170125
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28068667
[Au] Autor:Kempenaers B; Valcu M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard Gwinner Str, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Breeding site sampling across the Arctic by individual males of a polygynous shorebird.
[So] Source:Nature;541(7638):528-531, 2017 01 26.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4687
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Males of many polygynous species compete for access to fertile females without providing them with resources other than sperm and without investing in care for the offspring (male dominance polygyny). In such systems, local competition for access to females is intense and typically only a few males obtain matings, leading to strong sexual selection. Sampling multiple breeding areas could then provide a mechanism for males to increase their chances to reproduce. However, little is known about such sampling behaviour and about the spatial scale at which males compete. Here we show that most males of a migratory, polygynous shorebird, the pectoral sandpiper (Calidris melanotos), that arrived at a known breeding location in northern Alaska subsequently moved through a considerable part of the entire species' breeding range (up to 13,045 km in a four-week period), sampling as many as 23 additional potential breeding sites. Our data suggest that males do not have a final breeding destination after migration from their wintering quarters, but make nomadic movements that are probably not a consequence of breeding failure. Tenure, the duration of stay at a site, correlated strongly with the number of breeding females at the site, suggesting that decisions to leave are dependent on local mating opportunities. Nomadic movements may allow males to display and sire offspring at multiple sites within a single breeding season. Sexual selection may then favour high-performance males that are able to reduce sleep to compete locally and to fly long distances between breeding sites, leading to a population with unrestricted interbreeding and without local adaptation and speciation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Migração Animal
Charadriiformes/fisiologia
Reprodução
Estações do Ano
Comportamento Sexual Animal
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Alaska
Animais
Regiões Árticas
Canadá
Charadriiformes/genética
Comportamento Competitivo
Feminino
Especiação Genética
Masculino
Preferência de Acasalamento Animal
Ligação do Par
Federação Russa
Sibéria
Sono
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170620
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170620
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170110
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/nature20813



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