Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : F01.145.113.646 [Categoria DeCS]
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  1 / 1531 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28989098
[Au] Autor:Garbino GST; Martins-Junior AMG
[Ad] Endereço:PPG-Zoologia, Departamento de Zoologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Electronic address: antonio_mgmartins@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Phenotypic evolution in marmoset and tamarin monkeys (Cebidae, Callitrichinae) and a revised genus-level classification.
[So] Source:Mol Phylogenet Evol;118:156-171, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9513
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Marmosets and tamarins (Cebidae, Callitrichinae) constitute the most species-rich subfamily of New World monkeys and one of the most diverse phenotypically. Despite the profusion of molecular phylogenies of the group, the evolution of phenotypic characters under the rapidly-emerging consensual phylogeny of the subfamily has been little studied, resulting in taxonomic proposals that have limited support from other datasets. We examined the evolution of 18 phenotypic traits (5 continuous and 13 discrete), including pelage, skull, dentition, postcrania, life-history and vocalization variables in a robust molecular phylogeny of marmoset and tamarin monkeys, quantifying their phylogenetic signal and correlations among some of the traits. At the family level, our resulting topology supports owl monkeys (Aotinae) as sister group of Callitrichinae. The topology of the callitrichine tree was congruent with previous studies except for the position of the midas group of Saguinus tamarins, which placement as sister of the bicolor group did not receive significant statistical support in both Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian Inference analyses. Our results showed that the highest value of phylogenetic signal among continuous traits was displayed by the long call character and the lowest was exhibited in the home range, intermediate values were found in characters related to osteology and skull size. Among discrete traits, pelage and osteology had similar phylogenetic signal. Based on genetic, osteological, pelage and vocalization data, we present an updated genus-level taxonomy of Callitrichinae, which recognizes six genera in the subfamily: Callimico, Callithrix, Cebuella, Mico, Leontopithecus and Saguinus. To reflect their phenotypic distinctiveness and to avoid the use of the informal "species group", we subdivided Saguinus in the subgenera Leontocebus, Saguinus and Tamarinus (revalidated here).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Callitrichinae/classificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Teorema de Bayes
Tamanho Corporal
Callithrix/anatomia & histologia
Callithrix/classificação
Callitrichinae/anatomia & histologia
Geografia
Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital
Funções Verossimilhança
Fenótipo
Filogenia
Crânio/anatomia & histologia
Vocalização Animal/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171010
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 1531 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29176875
[Au] Autor:Mehlhorn J; Rehkaemper G
[Ad] Endereço:Research Group "Comparative Neurobiology and Evolutionary Research", Institute of Anatomy I, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
[Ti] Título:The orientation of homing pigeons (Columba livia f.d.) with and without navigational experience in a two-dimensional environment.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(11):e0188483, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Homing pigeons are known for their excellent homing ability, and their brains seem to be functionally adapted to homing. It is known that pigeons with navigational experience show a larger hippocampus and also a more lateralised brain than pigeons without navigational experience. So we hypothesized that experience may have an influence also on orientation ability. We examined two groups of pigeons (11 with navigational experience and 17 without) in a standard operant chamber with a touch screen monitor showing a 2-D schematic of a rectangular environment (as "geometric" information) and one uniquely shaped and colored feature in each corner (as "landmark" information). Pigeons were trained first for pecking on one of these features and then we examined their ability to encode geometric and landmark information in four tests by modifying the rectangular environment. All tests were done under binocular and monocular viewing to test hemispheric dominance. The number of pecks was counted for analysis. Results show that generally both groups orientate on the basis of landmarks and the geometry of environment, but landmark information was preferred. Pigeons with navigational experience did not perform better on the tests but showed a better conjunction of the different kinds of information. Significant differences between monocular and binocular viewing were detected particularly in pigeons without navigational experience on two tests with reduced information. Our data suggest that the conjunction of geometric and landmark information might be integrated after processing separately in each hemisphere and that this process is influenced by experience.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Columbidae/fisiologia
Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188483


  3 / 1531 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29188685
[Au] Autor:Volpe NL; Hadley AS; Robinson WD; Betts MG
[Ti] Título:Functional connectivity experiments reflect routine movement behavior of a tropical hummingbird species.
[So] Source:Ecol Appl;24(8):2122-31, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1051-0761
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Translocation experiments, in which researchers displace animals and then monitor their movements to return home, are commonly used as tools to assess functional connectivity of fragmented landscapes. Such experiments are purported to have important advantages of being time efficient and of standardizing "motivation" to move across individuals. Yet, we lack tests of whether movement behavior of translocated birds reflects natural behavior of unmanipulated birds. We compared the routine movement behavior of a tropical hummingbird, the Green Hermit (Phaethornis guy), to that of experimentally translocated individuals. We tested for differences in site selection patterns during movement at two spatial scales (point and path levels). We also compared movement rates between treatments. Behaviors documented during translocation experiments reflected those observed during routine movements. At the point level, both translocated and non-translocated birds showed similar levels of preference for mature tropical forest. At the path level, step selection functions showed both translocated and non-translocated hummingbirds avoiding movement across non-forested matrix and selecting streams as movement corridors. Movement rates were generally higher during translocation experiments. However, the negative influence of forest cover on movement rates was proportionately similar in translocation and routine movement treatments. We report the first evidence showing that movement behavior of birds during translocation experiments is similar to their natural movement behavior. Therefore, translocation experiments may be reliable tools to address effects of landscape structure on animal movement. We observed consistent selection of landscape elements between translocated and non-translocated birds, indicating that both routine and translocation movement studies lead to similar conclusions regarding the effect of landscape structure and forest composition on functional connectivity. Our observation that hummingbirds avoid non-forest matrix and select riparian corridors also provides a potential mechanism for pollen limitation in fragmented tropical forest.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aves/fisiologia
Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital/fisiologia
Atividade Motora/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Costa Rica
Ecossistema
Feminino
Masculino
Telemetria
Fatores de Tempo
Clima Tropical
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171221
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171221
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171201
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  4 / 1531 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28470852
[Au] Autor:Machado FS; Carvalho-Filho A; Giarrizzo T
[Ad] Endereço:Universidade Federal do Pará, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Laboratório de Biologia Pesqueira e Manejo dos Recursos Aquáticos, Grupo de Ecologia Aquática - GEA, Av. Perimetral, 2651, Terra Firme, 66077-570, Belém, PA, Brazil.
[Ti] Título:Redescription and range extension of the endangered Paiva's blenny Lupinoblennius paivai (Perciformes: Blenniidae).
[So] Source:J Fish Biol;90(6):2394-2401, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8649
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The Paiva's blenny Lupinoblennius paivai is redescribed and its range redefined along the Brazilian coast. It differs from its congeners by the presence of three cephalic pores between the dorsal-fin base and lateral line, dorsal-fin elements XII, 12, anal-fin elements II, 16, pectoral-fin rays 14 and 10 + 20 vertebrae. It is here reported from Amazon estuaries (Marajó and Mosqueiro islands, Pará State), increasing its range by c. 3000 km. Lupinoblennius paivai is one of the few blenniid species able to tolerate low salinities. New data about its meristics and morphometrics are presented, as well as a new habitat type.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital
Perciformes/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Animal
Brasil
Estuários
Feminino
Ilhas
Masculino
Perciformes/anatomia & histologia
Perciformes/classificação
Salinidade
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171128
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171128
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/jfb.13322


  5 / 1531 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28873453
[Au] Autor:Robinson DP; Jabado RW; Rohner CA; Pierce SJ; Hyland KP; Baverstock WR
[Ad] Endereço:Jumeirah Group, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
[Ti] Título:Satellite tagging of rehabilitated green sea turtles Chelonia mydas from the United Arab Emirates, including the longest tracked journey for the species.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(9):e0184286, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We collected movement data for eight rehabilitated and satellite-tagged green sea turtles Chelonia mydas released off the United Arab Emirates between 2005 and 2013. Rehabilitation periods ranged from 96 to 1353 days (mean = 437 ± 399 days). Seven of the eight tagged turtles survived after release; one turtle was killed by what is thought to be a post-release spear gun wound. The majority of turtles (63%) used shallow-water core habitats and established home ranges between Dubai and Abu Dhabi, the same area in which they had originally washed ashore prior to rescue. Four turtles made movements across international boundaries, highlighting that regional cooperation is necessary for the management of the species. One turtle swam from Fujairah to the Andaman Sea, a total distance of 8283 km, which is the longest published track of a green turtle. This study demonstrates that sea turtles can be successfully reintroduced into the wild after sustaining serious injury and undergoing prolonged periods of intense rehabilitation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Migração Animal/fisiologia
Comunicações Via Satélite
Tartarugas/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ecossistema
Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital
Estações do Ano
Especificidade da Espécie
Temperatura Ambiente
Fatores de Tempo
Emirados Árabes Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171016
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171016
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170906
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0184286


  6 / 1531 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28815964
[Au] Autor:Sugiyama Y
[Ad] Endereço:Professor Emeritus, Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University.
[Ti] Título:Sex-biased dispersal of human ancestors.
[So] Source:Evol Anthropol;26(4):172-180, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6505
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Some anthropologists and primatologists have argued that, judging by extant chimpanzees and humans, which are female-biased dispersers, the common ancestors of humans and chimpanzees were also female-biased dispersers. It has been thought that sex-biased dispersal patterns have been genetically transmitted for millions of years. However, this character has changed many times with changes in environment and life-form during human evolution and historical times. I examined life-form and social organization of nonhuman primates, among them gatherers (foragers), hunter-gatherers, agriculturalists, industrialists, and modern and extant humans. I conclude that dispersal patterns changed in response to environmental conditions during primate and human evolution.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Distribuição Animal/fisiologia
Evolução Biológica
Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital/fisiologia
Pan troglodytes/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Migração Humana
Seres Humanos
Indústrias
Masculino
Fatores Sexuais
Comportamento Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170906
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170906
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170818
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/evan.21539


  7 / 1531 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28751148
[Au] Autor:Graham P; Philippides A
[Ad] Endereço:Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Robotics, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9QG, UK. Electronic address: p.r.graham@sussex.ac.uk.
[Ti] Título:Vision for navigation: What can we learn from ants?
[So] Source:Arthropod Struct Dev;46(5):718-722, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5495
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The visual systems of all animals are used to provide information that can guide behaviour. In some cases insects demonstrate particularly impressive visually-guided behaviour and then we might reasonably ask how the low-resolution vision and limited neural resources of insects are tuned to particular behavioural strategies. Such questions are of interest to both biologists and to engineers seeking to emulate insect-level performance with lightweight hardware. One behaviour that insects share with many animals is the use of learnt visual information for navigation. Desert ants, in particular, are expert visual navigators. Across their foraging life, ants can learn long idiosyncratic foraging routes. What's more, these routes are learnt quickly and the visual cues that define them can be implemented for guidance independently of other social or personal information. Here we review the style of visual navigation in solitary foraging ants and consider the physiological mechanisms that underpin it. Our perspective is to consider that robust navigation comes from the optimal interaction between behavioural strategy, visual mechanisms and neural hardware. We consider each of these in turn, highlighting the value of ant-like mechanisms in biomimetic endeavours.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Formigas/fisiologia
Navegação Espacial/fisiologia
Visão Ocular/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Sinais (Psicologia)
Meio Ambiente
Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171020
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171020
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170729
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 1531 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28726303
[Au] Autor:Asensio N; José-Domínguez JM; Kongrit C; Brockelman WY
[Ad] Endereço:Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Salaya, Nakhon Pathom, 73170, Thailand.
[Ti] Título:The ecology of white-handed and pileated gibbons in a zone of overlap and hybridization in Thailand.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;163(4):716-728, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: The study of related species in contact zones can elucidate what factors mediate species coexistence and geographical distributions. We investigated niche overlap and group interactions of two gibbon species and their hybrids co-occurring in a zone of overlap and hybridization. METHODS: The location, composition and behavior of white-handed, pileated, and mixed-species gibbon groups were studied by following them during 31 consecutive months in a relatively large part of the contact zone. RESULTS: Twenty groups of white-handed gibbon were mapped followed by nine groups of pileated gibbons and five mixed-species groups. White-handed, pileated and mixed-species groups had similar sizes and composition, ate a high proportion of fruits, shared a large number of species in their diets, and presented similar habitat preferences. Group home range sizes did not differ between species and overlapped little with neighboring groups irrespective of species, and intraspecific and interspecific encounter rates were similar. DISCUSSION: Ecological similarities support that competition between the gibbon species exists and takes the form of interspecific territoriality. However, we could not find any clear mechanism of niche partitioning favoring coexistence between species. Our findings suggest that the contact zone is unstable and is maintained by dispersal inward from groups of the parental species. The relatively low numbers of mixed-species groups and hybrids found suggests a high degree of premating reproductive isolation, perhaps mediated by interspecific miscommunication. The existence of hybrids and backcrosses potentially undetectable from phenotypic characters alone raises the possibility of more widespread introgression than has been evident. Hence, while interspecific territoriality should reduce the rate of gene transfer, it would not necessarily present a barrier to introgression into contiguous populations of the opposite species.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ecossistema
Hylobates/fisiologia
Comportamento Social
Especificidade da Espécie
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antropologia Física
Evolução Biológica
Ecologia
Feminino
Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital
Masculino
Tailândia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170822
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170822
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170721
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23241


  9 / 1531 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28678813
[Au] Autor:Holland AE; Byrne ME; Bryan AL; DeVault TL; Rhodes OE; Beasley JC
[Ad] Endereço:Warnell School of Forestry & Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Fine-scale assessment of home ranges and activity patterns for resident black vultures (Coragyps atratus) and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura).
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0179819, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Knowledge of black vulture (Coragyps atratus) and turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) spatial ecology is surprisingly limited despite their vital ecological roles. Fine-scale assessments of space use patterns and resource selection are particularly lacking, although development of tracking technologies has allowed data collection at finer temporal and spatial resolution. Objectives of this study were to conduct the first assessment of monthly home range and core area sizes of resident black and turkey vultures with consideration to sex, as well as elucidate differences in monthly, seasonal, and annual activity patterns based on fine-scale movement data analyses. We collected 2.8-million locations for 9 black and 9 turkey vultures from June 2013 -August 2015 using solar-powered GSM/GPS transmitters. We quantified home ranges and core areas using the dynamic Brownian bridge movement model and evaluated differences as a function of species, sex, and month. Mean monthly home ranges for turkey vultures were ~50% larger than those of black vultures, although mean core area sizes did not differ between species. Turkey vulture home ranges varied little across months, with exception to a notable reduction in space-use in May, which corresponds with timing of chick-rearing activities. Black vulture home ranges and core areas as well as turkey vulture core areas were larger in breeding season months (January-April). Comparison of space use between male and female vultures was only possible for black vultures, and space use was only slightly larger for females during breeding months (February-May). Analysis of activity patterns revealed turkey vultures spend more time in flight and switch motion states (between flight and stationary) more frequently than black vultures across temporal scales. This study reveals substantive variability in space use and activity rates between sympatric black and turkey vultures, providing insights into potential behavioral mechanisms contributing to niche differentiation between these species.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Falconiformes
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Distribuição Animal
Animais
Cruzamento
Ecossistema
Feminino
Georgia
Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital
Masculino
Rios
Estações do Ano
South Carolina
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170922
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170922
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170706
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0179819


  10 / 1531 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28586523
[Au] Autor:Durner GM; Douglas DC; Albeke SE; Whiteman JP; Amstrup SC; Richardson E; Wilson RR; Ben-David M
[Ad] Endereço:U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Science Center, Anchorage, AK, USA.
[Ti] Título:Increased Arctic sea ice drift alters adult female polar bear movements and energetics.
[So] Source:Glob Chang Biol;23(9):3460-3473, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2486
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Recent reductions in thickness and extent have increased drift rates of Arctic sea ice. Increased ice drift could significantly affect the movements and the energy balance of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) which forage, nearly exclusively, on this substrate. We used radio-tracking and ice drift data to quantify the influence of increased drift on bear movements, and we modeled the consequences for energy demands of adult females in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas during two periods with different sea ice characteristics. Westward and northward drift of the sea ice used by polar bears in both regions increased between 1987-1998 and 1999-2013. To remain within their home ranges, polar bears responded to the higher westward ice drift with greater eastward movements, while their movements north in the spring and south in fall were frequently aided by ice motion. To compensate for more rapid westward ice drift in recent years, polar bears covered greater daily distances either by increasing their time spent active (7.6%-9.6%) or by increasing their travel speed (8.5%-8.9%). This increased their calculated annual energy expenditure by 1.8%-3.6% (depending on region and reproductive status), a cost that could be met by capturing an additional 1-3 seals/year. Polar bears selected similar habitats in both periods, indicating that faster drift did not alter habitat preferences. Compounding reduced foraging opportunities that result from habitat loss; changes in ice drift, and associated activity increases, likely exacerbate the physiological stress experienced by polar bears in a warming Arctic.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital
Camada de Gelo
Ursidae
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Migração Animal
Animais
Regiões Árticas
Mudança Climática
Ingestão de Energia
Feminino
Oceanos e Mares
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171023
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171023
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170607
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/gcb.13746



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