Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : F01.145.113.780.875 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 28 [refinar]
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  1 / 28 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28854648
[Au] Autor:Tadeo E; Muñiz E; Rull J; Yee WL; Aluja M; Lasa R
[Ad] Endereço:Red de Manejo Biorracional de Plagas y Vectores, Instituto de Ecología, A.C., Xalapa, Veracruz 91070, México.
[Ti] Título:Development of a Low-Cost and Effective Trapping Device for Apple Maggot Fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) Monitoring and Control in Mexican Commercial Hawthorn Groves.
[So] Source:J Econ Entomol;110(4):1658-1667, 2017 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-291X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Few efforts have been made in Mexico to monitor Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) (Diptera: Tephritidae) in commercial hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) crops. Therefore, the main objectives of this study were to evaluate infestation levels of R. pomonella in feral and commercial Mexican hawthorn and to assess the efficacy of different trap-lure combinations to monitor the pest. Wild hawthorn was more infested than commercially grown hawthorn at the sample site. No differences among four commercial baits (Biolure, ammonium carbonate, CeraTrap, and Captor + borax) were detected when used in combination with a yellow sticky gel (SG) adherent trap under field conditions. However, liquid lures elicited a slightly higher, although not statistically different, capture. Cage experiments in the laboratory revealed that flies tended to land more often on the upper and middle than lower-bottom part of polyethylene (PET) bottle traps with color circles. Among red, orange, green, and yellow circles attached to a bottle trap, only yellow circles improved fly captures compared with a colorless trap. A PET bottle trap with a red circle over a yellow background captured more flies than a similar trap with yellow circles. An SG adherent yellow panel trap baited with ammonium carbonate was superior to the improved PET bottle trap (red over a yellow background) baited with different liquid proteins, but a higher proportion of females and no differences in fly detection were measured in PET traps baited with protein lures. These trials open the door for future research into development of a conventional nonadherent trap to monitor or control R. pomonella.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Carbonatos/farmacologia
Controle de Insetos/instrumentação
Feromônios/farmacologia
Fototaxia
Tephritidae/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Cor
Crataegus/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Feminino
Masculino
México
Odorantes/análise
Tephritidae/efeitos dos fármacos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Carbonates); 0 (Pheromones); 0 (insect attractants); NJ5VT0FKLJ (ammonium carbonate)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170922
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170922
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170901
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jee/tox167


  2 / 28 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28700684
[Au] Autor:Zhao W; Gong C; Ouyang Z; Wang P; Wang J; Zhou P; Zheng N; Gong Z
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Neurobiology, Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of the Ministry of Health of China, Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
[Ti] Título:Turns with multiple and single head cast mediate Drosophila larval light avoidance.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0181193, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Drosophila larvae exhibit klinotaxis when placed in a gradient of temperature, chemicals, or light. The larva samples environmental stimuli by casting its head from side to side. By comparing the results of two consecutive samples, it decides the direction of movement, appearing as a turn proceeded by one or more head casts. Here by analyzing larval behavior in a light-spot-based phototaxis assay, we showed that, in addition to turns with a single cast (1-cast), turns with multiple head casts (n-cast) helped to improve the success of light avoidance. Upon entering the light spot, the probability of escape from light after the first head cast was only ~30%. As the number of head casts increased, the chance of successful light avoidance increased and the overall chance of escaping from light increased to >70%. The amplitudes of first head casts that failed in light avoidance were significantly smaller in n-cast turns than those in 1-cast events, indicating that n-cast turns might be planned before completion of the first head cast. In n-casts, the amplitude of the second head cast was generally larger than that of the first head cast, suggesting that larvae tried harder in later attempts to improve the efficacy of light avoidance. We propose that both 1-cast turns and n-cast turns contribute to successful larval light avoidance, and both can be initiated at the first head cast.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Drosophila/fisiologia
Luz
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Animal/efeitos da radiação
Drosophila/efeitos da radiação
Larva/fisiologia
Larva/efeitos da radiação
Fototaxia/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170925
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170925
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170713
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0181193


  3 / 28 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28591810
[Au] Autor:Schmid RB; Snyder D; Cohnstaedt LW; McCornack BP
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Entomology, Kansas State University, 123 W. Waters Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506.
[Ti] Título:Hessian Fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) Attraction to Different Wavelengths and Intensities of Light-Emitting Diodes in the Laboratory.
[So] Source:Environ Entomol;46(4):895-900, 2017 08 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2936
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Monitoring of Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), populations is important for targeted management methods. Also, effectiveness of monitoring efforts is critical to surveillance efforts in regions of the world without this pest. Current Hessian fly monitoring traps rely purely on a single attractant, the female sex pheromone, which is ineffective for monitoring females in the population. Our objective was to examine another attractant targeting vision of both males and females. To do this, we evaluated emitted light of various wavelengths and intensities produced by light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Hessian flies were released in the center of a four-leaf clover-shaped arena, which contained an LED within each collection cup at the apex of each of the four cloverleaves. Initially, we examined a range of colors, including red, amber, green, and blue, with wavelengths of 624, 590, 527, and 472 nm, respectively. Both sexes of Hessian fly preferred green LEDs; therefore, we examined specific wavelengths within the green spectrum (502, 525, and 565 nm), and varied light intensities (4, 8, 12, and 16 W/m2). Specifically, females preferred wavelengths in the lower region of the green spectrum (502 and 525 nm), and both sexes preferred high intensity light (16 W/m2). This is the first report of Hessian fly attraction to select emitted wavelengths and intensities from LEDs under controlled conditions. Leveraging these results into new trap designs will add a second sensory modality to the existing trap; however, future studies are needed to assess attraction to LED traps under field conditions.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dípteros/efeitos da radiação
Controle de Insetos
Luz
Fototaxia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Masculino
Fatores Sexuais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171126
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171126
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170608
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/ee/nvx099


  4 / 28 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28562607
[Au] Autor:Voigt CC; Roeleke M; Marggraf L; Petersons G; Voigt-Heucke SL
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Migratory bats respond to artificial green light with positive phototaxis.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(5):e0177748, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Artificial light at night is spreading worldwide at unprecedented rates, exposing strictly nocturnal animals such as bats to a novel anthropogenic stressor. Previous studies about the effect of artificial light on bats focused almost exclusively on non-migratory species, yet migratory animals such as birds are known to be largely affected by light pollution. Thus, we conducted a field experiment to evaluate if bat migration is affected by artificial light at night. In late summer, we presented artificial green light of 520 nm wavelength to bats that were migrating south along the shoreline of the Baltic Sea. Using a light on-off treatment, we observed that the activity of Pipistrellus nathusii and P. pygmaeus, the two most abundant migratory species at our site, increased by more than 50% in the light-on compared to the light-off treatment. We observed an increased number of feeding buzzes during the light-on compared to the light-off treatment for P. nathusii. However, feeding activity was low in general and did not increase disproportionately during the light-on treatment in relation to the overall echolocation call activity of bats. Further, P. nathusii were attracted towards the green light at a distance of about 23 m, which is way beyond the echolocation detection range for insects of Nathusius' bats. We therefore infer that migratory bats were not attracted to artificial green light because of high insect densities, but instead by positive phototaxis. We conclude that artificial light at night may potentially impact bat migration in a yet unrecognized way.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Migração Animal
Quirópteros/fisiologia
Luz
Fototaxia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Quirópteros/classificação
Ecolocação
Comportamento Alimentar
Especificidade da Espécie
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170921
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170921
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170601
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0177748


  5 / 28 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28498915
[Au] Autor:Hironaka M; Kamura T; Osada M; Sasaki R; Shinoda K; Hariyama T; Miyatake T
[Ad] Endereço:Hamamatsu University School of Medicine.
[Ti] Título:Adults of Lasioderma serricorne and Stegobium paniceum (Anobiidae: Coleoptera) Are Attracted to Ultraviolet (UV) Over Blue Light LEDs.
[So] Source:J Econ Entomol;110(4):1911-1915, 2017 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-291X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Two species, the cigarette beetle Lasioderma serricorne (F.) and the drugstore beetle Stegobium paniceum (L.), are particularly important stored-product pests because they damage dry food. A previous study showed that L. serricorne adults are attracted more to ultraviolet (UV) and blue light wave ranges more than others such as turquoise, green, yellow, red, and warm white. However, the previous study did not equalize the amounts of light. The study also evaluated the attractiveness by the numbers of L. serricorne individuals that were lured to LED lights in a small box in the laboratory. In some storehouses, damage by S. paniceum is more serious and establishment of an effective monitoring tool is required. Therefore, in the present study, attractions of these beetles to UV and blue light traps were compared to develop a tool to monitor the beetle pests. First, adult L. serricorne and S. paniceum beetles were provided with UV- and blue-LED panels whose light intensities were equalized in the laboratory, and the walking and flying paths of each adult were recorded and measured. As a result, adults were clearly attracted to the side of UV-LED panel by walking compared to the blue one. Second, we compared the numbers of cigarette beetles collected by sticky sheets that were set in the back of UV or blue-light LED traps in a real storehouse. The results showed that these beetles were significantly more attracted to UV than blue-light LED traps, indicating the UV-LED trap is a powerful tool to monitor these two pest species.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Coleópteros/fisiologia
Fototaxia
Raios Ultravioleta
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Coleópteros/efeitos da radiação
Feminino
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170513
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jee/tox127


  6 / 28 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28429324
[Au] Autor:Häder DP; Iseki M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biolology, Friedrich-Alexander Universität, Erlangen-Nürnberg, Neue Str. 9, 91096, Möhrendorf, Germany. donat@dphaeder.de.
[Ti] Título:Photomovement in Euglena.
[So] Source:Adv Exp Med Biol;979:207-235, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0065-2598
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Motile microorganisms such as the green Euglena gracilis use a number of external stimuli to orient in their environment. They respond to light with photophobic responses, photokinesis and phototaxis, all of which can result in accumulations of the organisms in suitable habitats. The light responses operate synergistically with gravitaxis, aerotaxis and other responses. Originally the microscopically obvious stigma was thought to be the photoreceptor, but later the paraxonemal body (PAB, paraflagellar body) has been identified as the light responsive organelle, located in the trailing flagellum inside the reservoir. The stigma can aid in light direction perception by shading the PAB periodically when the cell rotates helically in lateral light, but stigmaless mutants can also orient with respect to the light direction, and negative phototaxis does not need the presence of the stigma. The PAB is composed of dichroically oriented chromoproteins which is reflected in a pronounced polarotaxis in polarized light. There was a long debate about the potential photoreceptor molecule in Euglena, including carotenoids, flavins and rhodopsins. This discussion was terminated by the unambiguous proof that the photoreceptor is a 400 kDa photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) which consists of two α- and two ß-subunits each. Each subunit possesses two BLUF (Blue Light receptor Using FAD) domains binding FAD, which harvest the light energy, and two adenylyl cyclases, which produce cAMP from ATP. The cAMP has been found to activate one of the five protein kinase s found in Euglena (PK.4). This enzyme in turn is thought to phosphorylate proteins inside the flagellum which result in a change in the flagellar beating pattern and thus a course correction of the cell. The involvements of PAC and protein kinase have been confirmed by RNA interference (RNAi). PAC is responsible for step-up photophobic responses as well as positive and negative phototaxis, but not for the step-down photophobic response, even though the action spectrum of this resembles those for the other two responses. Analysis of several colorless Euglena mutants and the closely related Euglena longa (formerly Astasia longa) confirms the results. Photokinesis shows a completely different action spectrum. Some other Euglena species, such as E. sanguinea and the gliding E. mutabilis, have been investigated, again showing totally different action spectra for phototaxis and photokinesis as well as step-up and step-down photophobic responses.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Euglena gracilis/fisiologia
Fototaxia/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Flagelos/genética
Flagelos/metabolismo
Organelas/genética
Organelas/metabolismo
Proteínas de Protozoários/genética
Proteínas de Protozoários/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Protozoan Proteins)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171024
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171024
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170422
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/978-3-319-54910-1_11


  7 / 28 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28400530
[Au] Autor:Kim M
[Ad] Endereço:Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA minsu.kim@emory.edu.
[Ti] Título:Phototaxis of Cyanobacteria under Complex Light Environments.
[So] Source:MBio;8(2), 2017 Apr 11.
[Is] ISSN:2150-7511
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Photosynthetic bacteria are capable of producing their own food via photosynthesis. Unsurprisingly, they evolved the ability to move toward better light conditions (i.e., phototaxis). In a recent article in , Chau et al. tuned the wavelength, flux, direction, and timing of light input and characterized the motility of the unicellular cyanobacterium sp. strain PCC6803 (R. M. W. Chau, D. Bhaya, and K. C. Huang, mBio 8:e02330-16, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.02330-16). The results revealed an intricate dependence of the motility on various light inputs, laying the fundamental groundwork toward understanding phototaxis under complex and dynamic light environments.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fototaxia
Synechocystis
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Cianobactérias
Meio Ambiente
Luz
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171026
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171026
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170413
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 28 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28271338
[Au] Autor:Kinoshita N; Nagasato C; Motomura T
[Ad] Endereço:Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-0810, Japan.
[Ti] Título:Phototaxis and chemotaxis of brown algal swarmers.
[So] Source:J Plant Res;130(3):443-453, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1618-0860
[Cp] País de publicação:Japan
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Brown algae exhibit three patterns of sexual reproduction: isogamy, anisogamy, and oogamy. Unicellular swarmers including gametes and zoospores bear two heterogenous flagella, an anterior flagellum with mastigonemes (fine tripartite hairs) and a posterior one. In seawater, these flagellates usually receive physico-chemical signals for finding partners and good habitats. It is well known that brown algal swarmers change their swimming direction depending on blue light (phototaxis), and male gametes do so, based on the sex pheromones from female gametes (chemotaxis). In recent years, the comparative analysis of chemotaxis in isogamy, anisogamy, and oogamy has been conducted. In this paper, we focused on the phototaxis and chemotaxis of brown algal gametes comparing the current knowledge with our recent studies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Quimiotaxia/fisiologia
Fertilização/fisiologia
Feófitas/fisiologia
Fototaxia/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Fertilização/efeitos da radiação
Flagelos/fisiologia
Flagelos/efeitos da radiação
Fluorescência
Luz
Feófitas/classificação
Feófitas/citologia
Feófitas/efeitos da radiação
Feromônios/química
Feromônios/fisiologia
Reprodução/fisiologia
Reprodução/efeitos da radiação
Motilidade Espermática/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Pheromones)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171017
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171017
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170309
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10265-017-0914-8


  9 / 28 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28270586
[Au] Autor:Chau RM; Bhaya D; Huang KC
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
[Ti] Título:Emergent Phototactic Responses of Cyanobacteria under Complex Light Regimes.
[So] Source:MBio;8(2), 2017 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:2150-7511
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Environmental cues can stimulate a variety of single-cell responses, as well as collective behaviors that emerge within a bacterial community. These responses require signal integration and transduction, which can occur on a variety of time scales and often involve feedback between processes, for example, between growth and motility. Here, we investigate the dynamics of responses of the phototactic, unicellular cyanobacterium sp. PCC6803 to complex light inputs that simulate the natural environments that cells typically encounter. We quantified single-cell motility characteristics in response to light of different wavelengths and intensities. We found that red and green light primarily affected motility bias rather than speed, while blue light inhibited motility altogether. When light signals were simultaneously presented from different directions, cells exhibited phototaxis along the vector sum of the light directions, indicating that cells can sense and combine multiple signals into an integrated motility response. Under a combination of antagonistic light signal regimes (phototaxis-promoting green light and phototaxis-inhibiting blue light), the ensuing bias was continuously tuned by competition between the wavelengths, and the community response was dependent on both bias and cell growth. The phototactic dynamics upon a rapid light shift revealed a wavelength dependence on the time scales of photoreceptor activation/deactivation. Thus, cells achieve exquisite integration of light inputs at the cellular scale through continuous tuning of motility, and the pattern of collective behavior depends on single-cell motility and population growth. The photosynthetic cyanobacterium sp. exhibits phototaxis that is dependent on the incident light wavelength through the action of various photoreceptors. In natural environments, cells experience a set of highly dynamic and complex light inputs, yet how cells transduce multiple or dynamic inputs into motion is unknown. In this study, we measured the phototactic behaviors of single cells and communities as a function of light intensity or when illuminated by combinations of lights of different wavelengths or incidence directions. Responses to a spectrum of light regimes revealed that sp. integrates information about the light environment to tune its phototactic response, which is likely generated by competition among photoreceptors and the degree of wavelength-regulated growth to sensitively control the direction and degree of movement.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Luz
Fototaxia
Synechocystis/fisiologia
Synechocystis/efeitos da radiação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Fotorreceptores Microbianos
Transdução de Sinais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Photoreceptors, Microbial)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170713
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170713
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170309
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  10 / 28 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28234984
[Au] Autor:Ozasa K; Won J; Song S; Tamaki S; Ishikawa T; Maeda M
[Ad] Endereço:Bioengineering Lab, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, Japan.
[Ti] Título:Temporal change of photophobic step-up responses of Euglena gracilis investigated through motion analysis.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(2):e0172813, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The adaptation to a strong light is one of the essential characteristics of green algae, yet lacking relatively the information about the photophobic responses of Eukaryotic microalgae. We investigated the photophobic step-up responses of Euglena gracilis over a time course of several hours with alternated repetition of blue-light pulse illumination and spatially patterned blue-light illumination. Four distinctive photophobic motions in response to strong blue light were identified in a trace image analysis, namely on-site rotation, running and tumbling, continuous circular swimming, and unaffected straightforward swimming. The cells cultured in autotrophic conditions under weak light showed mainly the on-site rotation response at the beginning of blue-light illumination, but they acquired more blue-light tolerant responses of running and tumbling, circular swimming, or straightforward swimming. The efficiency of escaping from a blue-light illuminated area improved markedly with the development of these photophobic motions. Time constant of 3.0 h was deduced for the evolution of photophobic responses of E. gracilis. The nutrient-rich metabolic status of the cells resulting from photosynthesis during the experiments, i.e., the accumulation of photosynthesized nutrient products in balance between formation and consumption, was the main factor responsible for the development of photophobic responses. The reduction-oxidation status in and around E. gracilis cells did not affect their photophobic responses significantly, unlike the case of photophobic responses and phototaxis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. This study shows that the evolution of photophobic motion type of E. gracilis is dominated mainly by the nutrient metabolic status of the cells. The fact suggests that the nutrient-rich cells have a higher threshold for switching the flagellar motion from straightforward swimming to rotation under a strong light.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Euglena gracilis/fisiologia
Luz
Fototaxia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adaptação Fisiológica
Animais
Movimento Celular
Chlamydomonas reinhardtii/fisiologia
Alimentos
Processamento de Imagem Assistida por Computador
Microalgas/fisiologia
Estresse Oxidativo
Estimulação Luminosa
Fotossíntese
Rotação
Fatores de Tempo
Gravação em Vídeo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170906
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170906
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170225
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0172813



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