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[PMID]:29231043
[Au] Autor:Winkeljohn Black S; Pössel P; Dietz A
[Ad] Endereço:1 School of Behavioral Sciences and Education, Middletown, PA, USA.
[Ti] Título:Understanding Student Drinking Patterns: Does Shame Proneness Matter?
[So] Source:J Drug Educ;46(3-4):82-95, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1541-4159
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This study ( N = 202; mean age = 19.52 years, SD = 1.36 years; 66.5% female) analyzed three structural equation models to determine whether ruminative brooding and negative affect, moderated by shame proneness, explained college student drinking behaviors more than a model without shame proneness. Results indicated a model including shame proneness fit the data best; however, the moderated variables were not significantly associated with other variables in the retained model. Results are discussed alongside clinical recommendations within a university counseling center framework.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Adaptação Psicológica
Consumo de Álcool na Faculdade/psicologia
Modelos Psicológicos
Assunção de Riscos
Vergonha
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Inquéritos e Questionários
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180205
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180205
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/0047237917728357


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[PMID]:27776267
[Au] Autor:Boyle SC; Earle AM; LaBrie JW; Ballou K
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA 90045, United States.
[Ti] Título:Facebook dethroned: Revealing the more likely social media destinations for college students' depictions of underage drinking.
[So] Source:Addict Behav;65:63-67, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6327
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Studies examining representations of college drinking on social media have almost exclusively focused on Facebook. However, recent research suggests college students may be more influenced by peers' alcohol-related posts on Instagram and Snapchat, two image-based platforms popular among this demographic. One potential explanation for this differential influence is that qualitative distinctions in the types of alcohol-related content posted by students on these three platforms may exist. Informed by undergraduate focus groups, this study examined the hypothesis that, of the three platforms, students tend to use Instagram most often for photos glamourizing drinking and Snapchat for incriminating photos of alcohol misuse and negative consequences. Undergraduate research assistants aided investigators in developing hypothetical vignettes and photographic examples of posts both glamorizing and depicting negative consequences associated with college drinking. In an online survey, vignette and photo stimuli were followed by counterbalanced paired comparisons that presented each possible pair of social media platforms. Undergraduates (N=196) selected the platform from each pair on which they would be more likely to see each post. Generalized Bradley-Terry models examined the probabilities of platform selections. As predicted, Instagram was seen as the most probable destination (and Facebook least probable) for photos depicting alcohol use as attractive and glamorous. Conversely, Snapchat was selected as the most probable destination (and Facebook least probable) for items depicting negative consequences associated with heavy drinking. Results suggest researchers aiming to mitigate the potential influences associated with college students' glamorous and consequential alcohol-related photos posted social media posts should shift their focus from Facebook to Instagram and Snapchat.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Álcool na Faculdade
Mídias Sociais/estatística & dados numéricos
Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos
Consumo de Álcool por Menores/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Inquéritos e Questionários
Universidades
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180201
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180201
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28582352
[Au] Autor:Serowoky ML; Kwasky AN
[Ad] Endereço:Mary L. Serowoky, DNP, APRN-BC, FNP, and Andrea N. Kwasky, DNP, PMHCNS-BC, PMHNP-BC, McAuley School of Nursing, University of Detroit Mercy, Michigan.
[Ti] Título:Health Behaviors Survey: An Examination of Undergraduate Students' Substance Use.
[So] Source:J Addict Nurs;28(2):63-70, 2017 Apr/Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1548-7148
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: This study determined the prevalence of alcohol, drug, and nonmedical prescription drugs at a small private university. In addition, risk and protective factors are examined. METHOD: The Core Institute (Southern Illinois University) was contracted to administer an anonymous, Web-based 49-item survey to matriculated undergraduate students, aged 18-23 years. Data were obtained on student behaviors, perceptions, consequences of substance use, risk factors, and coping strategies. Statistical analysis included descriptive measures, cross-tabs, t test, and chi-square. RESULTS: The response rate was 14%, which is consistent with other CORE Institute surveys. Almost half of the total respondents were from the college of nursing (46%), and most participants were female (82%). There was a significant association between heavy drinking and grades; the B students engaged in more binge drinking. Living on campus and being involved in Greek life confer a higher level of risk for sexual assault when alcohol was consumed. Most participants (57%) were unaware of campus resources for assistance with alcohol or drug problems. CONCLUSION: Campus administrators now have a better awareness related to the extent of drug and alcohol use among the student body. A faculty engagement workshop was developed to provide tools to assess and communicate with students. Improvements are anticipated to enhance student relationships and decrease incidents of drug- and alcohol-related sexual assault or misconduct.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento do Adolescente
Consumo de Álcool na Faculdade
Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde
Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos
Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Illinois/epidemiologia
Masculino
Prevalência
Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/enfermagem
Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/prevenção & controle
Inquéritos e Questionários
Universidades
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171023
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171023
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170606
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/JAN.0000000000000165


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[PMID]:28387209
[Au] Autor:Nourse R; Adamshick P; Stoltzfus J
[Ad] Endereço:St. Luke's University Hospital, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, United States.
[Ti] Título:College Binge Drinking and Its Association with Depression and Anxiety: A Prospective Observational Study.
[So] Source:East Asian Arch Psychiatry;27(1):18-25, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2224-7041
[Cp] País de publicação:China
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: Binge drinking is a significant public health problem across college campuses in the United States. Despite substantial research and the use of evidence-based methods, the binge drinking culture remains an obstinate health crisis on campuses. This study examined the current binge drinking rate on a selected college campus, the association between binge drinking and anxiety and depression as well as the associated consequences of students' alcohol use. METHODS: A sample of 201 students from a small, private Mid-Atlantic college completed validated scales as well as demographics and questionnaires. Primary outcome measures were the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, 7-item Generalised Anxiety Questionnaire, and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Secondary measures were the Brief Young Adult Alcohol Consequences Questionnaire, questionnaires, and demographics. Descriptive outcomes, frequencies and percentages, and separate Chi-square tests methodologies were utilised for analyses. RESULTS: According to the AUDIT, 93% of students engaged in hazardous drinking, with a binge drinking rate of 38.8%. No significant associations were found between hazardous drinking and depression (p = 0.20) or anxiety (p = 0.68) levels in students. A significant relationship was found between their amount of drinking and negative consequences (p < 0.001). A substantial number of students reported moderate and severe levels of anxiety and depression. CONCLUSIONS: Our student sample engaged in binge drinking, suffered negative consequences, and presented with anxiety and depression issues along with gender implications as females had higher rates of depression and anxiety. Males drank significantly more and binged more often than females. The majority of students who binged experienced memory loss. Both females and males reported taking foolish risks and being impulsive when drinking. Students are vulnerable to harmful consequences when binging and have poor insight regarding binge drinking.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Álcool na Faculdade/psicologia
Ansiedade/epidemiologia
Bebedeira/epidemiologia
Bebedeira/psicologia
Depressão/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Comorbidade
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Comportamento Impulsivo/efeitos dos fármacos
Masculino
Transtornos da Memória/induzido quimicamente
Transtornos da Memória/epidemiologia
New England/epidemiologia
Estudos Prospectivos
Assunção de Riscos
Fatores Sexuais
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170804
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170804
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170408
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28356112
[Au] Autor:Croff JM; Leavens E; Olson K
[Ad] Endereço:School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology, Oklahoma State University, 429 Willard Hall, Stillwater, OK, 74078, USA. julie.croff@okstate.edu.
[Ti] Título:Predictors of breath alcohol concentrations in college parties.
[So] Source:Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy;12(1):10, 2017 Mar 30.
[Is] ISSN:1747-597X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Alcohol use and subsequent consequences are harmful for individual college students. Other students and the university can also be negatively impacted by the consequences of alcohol use. METHOD: A field-based study was used to assess the alcohol use environment at college parties. Researchers replicated a previous study by driving and walking a route to identify parties primarily on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings between 9:00 PM and 1:00 AM across an academic year. Parties were randomly sampled. Hosts were asked for permission to enter the party at each sampled location. A census of partygoers was attempted at each party. Participants were asked to complete a brief survey and give a breath sample. All participants were recruited into a follow-up survey. Bivariate and multivariate analyses of individual-level and party-level factors associated with intoxication are presented. RESULTS: The research team identified 29 parties: 16 were approached, and 12 were surveyed. Overall, 112 participants were surveyed for a response rate of approximately 28.7% of partygoers. Controlling for demographic characteristics, consumption of shots of liquor/spirits was significantly associated with a five times greater risk for intoxication. Notably, drinking games were protective of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) risk in this model. Individuals who reported engaging in drinking games were 74% less likely to report a BrAC above the U.S. legal limit, while controlling for underage drinking in the model. Several party characteristics were identified that increased overall BrAC at the parties, including whether the party was themed, if it was a Greek life party, and whether there were illicit drugs present. Notably, when intoxication is examined by gender and party theme, women are significantly more likely to be intoxicated at themed parties: 75% were above 0.08 at themed parties compared to 35% above 0.08 at non-themed parties. CONCLUSIONS: Field-based data collection methods can, and should, be modified to conduct needs assessment and evaluation of prevention programs on college campuses. The findings on this campus were different than the originally sampled campus. Prevention programs should target unique risks identified on each campus, and to respond to problematic party behaviors with comprehensive programming rather than policy-level bans.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Álcool na Faculdade/psicologia
Atividades de Lazer/psicologia
Universidades/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Testes Respiratórios
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Fatores de Risco
Estudantes/psicologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171023
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171023
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170331
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13011-017-0095-4


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[PMID]:28317505
[Au] Autor:Rinker DV; Young CM; Krieger H; Lembo J; Neighbors C
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, University of Houston, Houston, Texas.
[Ti] Título:Evaluations and Perceptions of Others' Evaluations of Negative Alcohol-Related Consequences Predict Negative Alcohol-Related Consequences Among College Drinkers.
[So] Source:J Stud Alcohol Drugs;78(2):249-257, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1938-4114
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: A key assumption when assessing alcohol-related problems is that these problems are considered negative. A growing literature suggests that college drinkers do not perceive all measured consequences to be negative. Research has established the impact of others' beliefs on personal beliefs and behaviors. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of perceptions of others' evaluations (POE) of consequences on one's own evaluations and subsequent experiences of consequences. METHOD: A sample of 885 heavy drinking college students participated in a longitudinal study. Participants reported the number of alcoholic drinks consumed per week, experiences of alcohol-related problems, evaluations of those consequences, and perceptions of how typical university students evaluate those consequences. A moderated mediation of POE on negative alcohol-related consequences via evaluations of consequences at differing levels of alcohol consumption was conducted, with gender, baseline consequences, and intervention effects being controlled for. RESULTS: Results indicated that POE had no direct effect on subsequent consequences. However, an indirect effect was found through evaluations of consequences, such that there was a positive association between both POE and evaluations of consequences, and evaluations of consequences and subsequent consequences. Average weekly drinking moderated the association between POE and evaluations of consequences, such that the association between POE and evaluations of consequences was stronger for those who drank more heavily. CONCLUSIONS: Results are consistent with social cognition processes, such as pluralistic ignorance, and suggest that POE and evaluations of consequences should be considered in the construction of interventions targeting heavy-drinking college students.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Álcool na Faculdade
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia
Estudantes
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Percepção
Comportamento Social
Universidades
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171029
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171029
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170321
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28182193
[Au] Autor:Lavigne AM; Wood MD; Janssen T; Wiers RW
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, The University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, USA.
[Ti] Título:Implicit and Explicit Alcohol Cognitions: The Moderating Effect of Executive Functions.
[So] Source:Alcohol Alcohol;52(2):256-262, 2017 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1464-3502
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Álcool na Faculdade/psicologia
Cognição/fisiologia
Função Executiva/fisiologia
Inibição (Psicologia)
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Estudos Transversais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Estimulação Luminosa/métodos
Teste de Stroop
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1702
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170615
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170615
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170210
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/alcalc/agw066


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[PMID]:28130974
[Au] Autor:Greene KM; Maggs JL
[Ad] Endereço:Montana State University, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, United States. Electronic address: kaylin.greene@montana.edu.
[Ti] Título:Academic time during college: Associations with mood, tiredness, and binge drinking across days and semesters.
[So] Source:J Adolesc;56:24-33, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9254
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The current study examined the amount of time American college students spent on academics and explored whether functioning indicators (i.e., positive affect, negative affect, tiredness, and binge drinking) rose and fell with academic time across days and semesters. College students (N = 735) were followed longitudinally and completed 14 daily diaries within each of 7 semesters (N = 56,699 days). The results revealed that academic time decreased slightly during the middle semesters and then increased in later semesters. Furthermore, on days when students spent more time on academics, they reported less positive affect, more tiredness, and less binge drinking; however, the strength and direction of associations depended on the analysis level and whether it was a weekend. Positive affect, for instance, was inversely associated with academics across days, but the reverse was true across semesters. These results emphasize the importance of considering the temporal context in research on adolescent and young adult time use.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Afeto
Consumo de Álcool na Faculdade/psicologia
Bebedeira/psicologia
Fadiga/psicologia
Estudantes/psicologia
Fatores de Tempo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Bebedeira/epidemiologia
Fadiga/epidemiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Modelos Lineares
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Autorrelato
Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos
Inquéritos e Questionários
Universidades
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170621
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170621
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170129
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28094998
[Au] Autor:Miller MB; DiBello AM; Lust SA; Meisel MK; Carey KB
[Ad] Endereço:Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health.
[Ti] Título:Impulsive personality traits and alcohol use: Does sleeping help with thinking?
[So] Source:Psychol Addict Behav;31(1):46-53, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1939-1501
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Both impulsivity and sleep disturbance have been associated with heavy alcohol use among young adults; yet studies to date have not examined their interactive effects. The current study aimed to determine if adequate sleep moderates the association between impulsive personality traits and alcohol use among young adults. College students (N = 568) who had been mandated to alcohol treatment following violation of campus alcohol policy provided information regarding alcohol use and related consequences, impulsive personality traits (measured using the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale), and perception of sleep adequacy as part of a larger intervention trial. Higher urgency, lower premeditation, and higher sensation-seeking predicted greater levels of alcohol consumption, while higher urgency predicted more alcohol-related consequences. As hypothesized, there was a significant interaction between premeditation and sleep adequacy in the prediction of drinks per week; in contrast to hypotheses, however, premeditation was associated with drinking only among those reporting adequate (rather than inadequate) sleep. Specifically, the tendency to premeditate was associated with less drinking among those who reported adequate sleep and was not associated with drinking among those reporting inadequate sleep. Sensation-seeking and urgency are associated with greater alcohol involvement among young adults, regardless of sleep adequacy. Conversely, the ability to plan ahead and anticipate the consequences of one's behaviors (premeditation) is only protective against heavy drinking among individuals receiving adequate sleep. With replication, these findings may inform alcohol prevention and intervention efforts. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Álcool na Faculdade/psicologia
Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool/fisiopatologia
Comportamento Impulsivo/fisiologia
Personalidade/fisiologia
Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/fisiopatologia
Sono/fisiologia
Pensamento/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170605
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170605
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170118
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/adb0000241


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[PMID]:28080092
[Au] Autor:Pedersen ER; Neighbors C; Atkins DC; Lee CM; Larimer ME
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Behavioral and Policy Sciences.
[Ti] Título:Brief online interventions targeting risk and protective factors for increased and problematic alcohol use among American college students studying abroad.
[So] Source:Psychol Addict Behav;31(2):220-230, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1939-1501
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Research documents increased and problematic alcohol use during study abroad experiences for college students yet no research documents effective preventive programs with these students. The present randomized controlled trial was designed to prevent increased and problematic alcohol use abroad by correcting misperceptions of peer drinking norms abroad and by promoting positive and healthy adjustment into the host culture (i.e., sojourner adjustment) through brief online personalized feedback interventions. A sample of 343 study abroad college students was randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions including a personalized normative feedback intervention (PNF), a sojourner adjustment feedback intervention (SAF), a combined PNF + SAF intervention, and an assessment-only control condition. Generalized estimated equation analyses accounting for baseline drinking and consequences revealed an intervention effect for PNF that was mitigated by baseline drinking level, such that PNF was best for those with lighter baseline drinking, but heavier baseline drinkers receiving PNF alone or PNF + SAF drank comparatively similar or more heavily abroad to those in the control condition. However, PNF + SAF condition participants with greater baseline levels of consequences reported comparatively less consequences abroad than their control participants. Thus, PNF alone may be helpful for lighter drinkers at predeparture and the addition of SAF to PNF may help prevent consequences abroad for those reporting more consequences prior to departure abroad. This research represents an important first step in designing and implementing efficacious interventions with at-risk study abroad college students, for which no current empirically based programs exist. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Álcool na Faculdade/psicologia
Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool/prevenção & controle
Psicoterapia Breve/métodos
Estudantes/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Internet
Masculino
Fatores de Proteção
Fatores de Risco
Estados Unidos
Universidades
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170620
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170620
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170113
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/adb0000242



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