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Pesquisa : F01.145.510 [Categoria DeCS]
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  1 / 4104 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28456052
[Au] Autor:Corriveau KH; DiYanni CJ; Clegg JM; Min G; Chin J; Nasrini J
[Ad] Endereço:Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address: kcorriv@bu.edu.
[Ti] Título:Cultural differences in the imitation and transmission of inefficient actions.
[So] Source:J Exp Child Psychol;161:1-18, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0457
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Across two studies, we explored cultural differences in children's imitation and transmission of inefficient actions. Chinese American and Caucasian American preschoolers (N=115) viewed either one or three models using two inefficient tools to perform two different tasks. In the video, when the model(s) performed the task, only the inefficient tool was available; thus, their choice to use that tool could be considered rational. Next, children were invited to complete the task with either the inefficient tool or an efficient alternative. Whereas the two cultural groups imitated a single model at similar rates, Chinese American children imitated significantly more than Caucasian American children after viewing a consensus. Similar results were found when exploring differences in information transmission. The Chinese American children were significantly more likely than their Caucasian American peers to instruct using an inefficient tool when they had initially viewed a consensus demonstrate it. We discuss these findings with respect to differences in children's use of social versus task-specific cues for learning and teaching.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Americanos Asiáticos/psicologia
Comparação Transcultural
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/psicologia
Comportamento Imitativo
Ensino/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Pré-Escolar
Consenso
Sinais (Psicologia)
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Aprendizagem
Masculino
Grupo Associado
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180213
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180213
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170430
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 4104 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28155421
[Au] Autor:Lanzoni S
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Continuing Education, Harvard University.
[Ti] Título:Imagining and Imaging the Social Brain: The Case of Mirror Neurons.
[So] Source:Can Bull Med Hist;33(2):447-464, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0823-2105
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In a contemporary setting in which all things "neuro" have great cultural sway, an analysis of the ways in which neuroscience is indebted to the methods and findings of the social sciences has received less attention. Indeed, in the new specialization of social neuroscience, neuroscientists now collaborate with contemporary psychologists and invoke historical psychological theories to help theorize empathy and social understanding. This article examines the overlap between psychological frameworks of social emotion and neuroscience in the case of mirror neurons, discovered in the 1990s. Some neuroscientists purport that mirror neurons underlie the social behaviours of imitation and empathy, and have found support for this view of theories of simulation and embodied cognition. They have also invoked pragmatic and phenomenological approaches to mind and behaviour dating back to the early 20 century. Neuroscientists have thus imported, adapted, and interpreted psychological models to help define social understanding, empathy, and imitation in many imaging studies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Neurônios-Espelho
Modelos Psicológicos
Neurociências
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Emoções
Empatia
Seres Humanos
Comportamento Imitativo
Comportamento Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171212
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171212
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:QIS
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170204
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3138/cbmh.33.2.151-27012015


  3 / 4104 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29040294
[Au] Autor:Riaz F; Niazi MA
[Ad] Endereço:Dept. Of Computing-Iqra University, Islamabad, Pakistan.
[Ti] Título:Towards social autonomous vehicles: Efficient collision avoidance scheme using Richardson's arms race model.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0186103, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This paper presents the concept of a social autonomous agent to conceptualize such Autonomous Vehicles (AVs), which interacts with other AVs using social manners similar to human behavior. The presented AVs also have the capability of predicting intentions, i.e. mentalizing and copying the actions of each other, i.e. mirroring. Exploratory Agent Based Modeling (EABM) level of the Cognitive Agent Based Computing (CABC) framework has been utilized to design the proposed social agent. Furthermore, to emulate the functionality of mentalizing and mirroring modules of proposed social agent, a tailored mathematical model of the Richardson's arms race model has also been presented. The performance of the proposed social agent has been validated at two levels-firstly it has been simulated using NetLogo, a standard agent-based modeling tool and also, at a practical level using a prototype AV. The simulation results have confirmed that the proposed social agent-based collision avoidance strategy is 78.52% more efficient than Random walk based collision avoidance strategy in congested flock-like topologies. Whereas practical results have confirmed that the proposed scheme can avoid rear end and lateral collisions with the efficiency of 99.876% as compared with the IEEE 802.11n-based existing state of the art mirroring neuron-based collision avoidance scheme.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Acidentes de Trânsito/prevenção & controle
Condução de Veículo/psicologia
Automóveis
Aprendizado de Máquina
Modelos Psicológicos
Robótica/instrumentação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Simulação por Computador
Seres Humanos
Comportamento Imitativo
Intenção
Robótica/métodos
Análise de Sistemas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171031
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171031
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171018
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0186103


  4 / 4104 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28877197
[Au] Autor:Genschow O; van Den Bossche S; Cracco E; Bardi L; Rigoni D; Brass M
[Ad] Endereço:Social Cognition Center Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Mimicry and automatic imitation are not correlated.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(9):e0183784, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:It is widely known that individuals have a tendency to imitate each other. However, different psychological disciplines assess imitation in different manners. While social psychologists assess mimicry by means of action observation, cognitive psychologists assess automatic imitation with reaction time based measures on a trial-by-trial basis. Although these methods differ in crucial methodological aspects, both phenomena are assumed to rely on similar underlying mechanisms. This raises the fundamental question whether mimicry and automatic imitation are actually correlated. In the present research we assessed both phenomena and did not find a meaningful correlation. Moreover, personality traits such as empathy, autism traits, and traits related to self- versus other-focus did not correlate with mimicry or automatic imitation either. Theoretical implications are discussed.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Mimetismo Biológico
Comportamento Imitativo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Empatia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Personalidade
Testes de Personalidade
Comportamento Social
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Inquéritos e Questionários
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171003
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171003
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170907
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0183784


  5 / 4104 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28813454
[Au] Autor:Li B; Sharma A; Meng J; Purushwalkam S; Gowen E
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Computer Science, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:Applying machine learning to identify autistic adults using imitation: An exploratory study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(8):e0182652, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Autism spectrum condition (ASC) is primarily diagnosed by behavioural symptoms including social, sensory and motor aspects. Although stereotyped, repetitive motor movements are considered during diagnosis, quantitative measures that identify kinematic characteristics in the movement patterns of autistic individuals are poorly studied, preventing advances in understanding the aetiology of motor impairment, or whether a wider range of motor characteristics could be used for diagnosis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether data-driven machine learning based methods could be used to address some fundamental problems with regard to identifying discriminative test conditions and kinematic parameters to classify between ASC and neurotypical controls. Data was based on a previous task where 16 ASC participants and 14 age, IQ matched controls observed then imitated a series of hand movements. 40 kinematic parameters extracted from eight imitation conditions were analysed using machine learning based methods. Two optimal imitation conditions and nine most significant kinematic parameters were identified and compared with some standard attribute evaluators. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to apply machine learning to kinematic movement parameters measured during imitation of hand movements to investigate the identification of ASC. Although based on a small sample, the work demonstrates the feasibility of applying machine learning methods to analyse high-dimensional data and suggest the potential of machine learning for identifying kinematic biomarkers that could contribute to the diagnostic classification of autism.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtorno do Espectro Autista/diagnóstico
Transtorno do Espectro Autista/psicologia
Comportamento Imitativo
Aprendizado de Máquina
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Fenômenos Biomecânicos
Estudos de Casos e Controles
Seres Humanos
Movimento
Característica Quantitativa Herdável
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171018
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171018
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170817
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0182652


  6 / 4104 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28686719
[Au] Autor:Sprague DA; House T
[Ad] Endereço:Spectra Analytics, 40-42 Scrutton St, London EC2A 4PP, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:Evidence for complex contagion models of social contagion from observational data.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0180802, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Social influence can lead to behavioural 'fads' that are briefly popular and quickly die out. Various models have been proposed for these phenomena, but empirical evidence of their accuracy as real-world predictive tools has so far been absent. Here we find that a 'complex contagion' model accurately describes the spread of behaviours driven by online sharing. We found that standard, 'simple', contagion often fails to capture both the rapid spread and the long tails of popularity seen in real fads, where our complex contagion model succeeds. Complex contagion also has predictive power: it successfully predicted the peak time and duration of the ALS Icebucket Challenge. The fast spread and longer duration of fads driven by complex contagion has important implications for activities such as publicity campaigns and charity drives.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Imitativo/fisiologia
Modelos Estatísticos
Infuência dos Pares
Meio Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Internet
Modelos Psicológicos
Rede Social
Percepção Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170922
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170922
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170708
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0180802


  7 / 4104 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28636677
[Au] Autor:Abramson JZ; Hernández-Lloreda MV; Esteban JA; Colmenares F; Aboitiz F; Call J
[Ad] Endereço:Departamento de Psiquiatría, Facultad de Medicina, y Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencia, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
[Ti] Título:Contextual imitation of intransitive body actions in a Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): A "do as other does" study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(6):e0178906, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Cetaceans are remarkable for exhibiting group-specific behavioral traditions or cultures in several behavioral domains (e.g., calls, behavioral tactics), and the question of whether they can be acquired socially, for example through imitative processes, remains open. Here we used a "Do as other does" paradigm to experimentally study the ability of a beluga to imitate familiar intransitive (body-oriented) actions demonstrated by a conspecific. The participant was first trained to copy three familiar behaviors on command (training phase) and then was tested for her ability to generalize the learned "Do as the other does" command to a different set of three familiar behaviors (testing phase). We found that the beluga (1) was capable of learning the copy command signal "Do what-the-other-does"; (2) exhibited high matching accuracy for trained behaviors (mean = 84% of correct performance) after making the first successful copy on command; (3) copied successfully the new set of three familiar generalization behaviors that were untrained to the copy command (range of first copy = 12 to 35 trials); and (4) deployed a high level of matching accuracy (mean = 83%) after making the first copy of an untrained behavior on command. This is the first evidence of contextual imitation of intransitive (body-oriented) movements in the beluga and adds to the reported findings on production imitation of sounds in this species and production imitation of sounds and motor actions in several cetaceans, especially dolphins and killer whales. Collectively these findings highlight the notion that cetaceans have a natural propensity at skillfully and proficiently matching the sounds and body movements demonstrated by conspecifics, a fitness-enhancing propensity in the context of cooperative hunting and anti-predatory defense tactics, and of alliance formation strategies that have been documented in these species' natural habitats. Future work should determine if the beluga can also imitate novel motor actions.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Percepção Auditiva/fisiologia
Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Beluga/psicologia
Comportamento Imitativo
Atividade Motora/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Aprendizagem
Masculino
Desempenho Psicomotor
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171004
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171004
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170622
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0178906


  8 / 4104 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28617816
[Au] Autor:Paukner A; Pedersen EJ; Simpson EA
[Ad] Endereço:Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Poolesville, Maryland, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Testing the arousal hypothesis of neonatal imitation in infant rhesus macaques.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(6):e0178864, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Neonatal imitation is the matching of (often facial) gestures by newborn infants. Some studies suggest that performance of facial gestures is due to general arousal, which may produce false positives on neonatal imitation assessments. Here we examine whether arousal is linked to facial gesturing in newborn infant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). We tested 163 infants in a neonatal imitation paradigm in their first postnatal week and analyzed their lipsmacking gestures (a rapid opening and closing of the mouth), tongue protrusion gestures, and yawn responses (a measure of arousal). Arousal increased during dynamic stimulus presentation compared to the static baseline across all conditions, and arousal was higher in the facial gestures conditions than the nonsocial control condition. However, even after controlling for arousal, we found a condition-specific increase in facial gestures in infants who matched lipsmacking and tongue protrusion gestures. Thus, we found no support for the arousal hypothesis. Consistent with reports in human newborns, imitators' propensity to match facial gestures is based on abilities that go beyond mere arousal. We discuss optimal testing conditions to minimize potentially confounding effects of arousal on measurements of neonatal imitation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Nível de Alerta/fisiologia
Comportamento Imitativo/fisiologia
Macaca mulatta/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Animais Recém-Nascidos/fisiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170914
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170914
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170616
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0178864


  9 / 4104 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28391125
[Au] Autor:Buttelmann D; Schieler A; Wetzel N; Widmann A
[Ad] Endereço:University of Erfurt, Germany. Electronic address: david.buttelmann@psy.unibe.ch.
[Ti] Título:Infants' and adults' looking behavior does not indicate perceptual distraction for constrained modelled actions - An eye-tracking study.
[So] Source:Infant Behav Dev;47:103-111, 2017 05.
[Is] ISSN:1934-8800
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:When observing a novel action, infants pay attention to the model's constraints when deciding whether to imitate this action or not. Gergely et al. (2002) found that more 14-month-olds copied a model's use of her head to operate a lamp when she used her head while her hands were free than when she had to use this means because it was the only means available to her (i.e., her hands were occupied). The perceptional distraction account (Beisert et al., 2012) claims that differences between conditions in terms of the amount of attention infants paid to the modeled action caused the differences in infants' performance between conditions. In order to investigate this assumption we presented 14-month-olds (N=34) with an eye-tracking paradigm and analyzed their looking behavior when observing the head-touch demonstration in the two original conditions. Subsequently, they had the chance to operate the apparatus themselves, and we measured their imitative responses. In order to explore the perceptional processes taking place in this paradigm in adulthood, we also presented adults (N=31) with the same task. Apart from the fact that we did not replicate the findings in imitation with our participants, the eye-tracking results do not support the perceptional distraction account: infants did not statistically differ - not even tendentially - in their amount of looking at the modeled action in both conditions. Adults also did not statistically differ in their looking at the relevant action components. However, both groups predominantly observed the relevant head action. Consequently, infants and adults do not seem to attend differently to constrained and unconstrained modelled actions.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Imitativo/fisiologia
Comportamento do Lactente/fisiologia
Percepção/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Atenção
Feminino
Mãos
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Masculino
Tato
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171126
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171126
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170410
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  10 / 4104 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28359082
[Au] Autor:Wray C; Saunders N; McGuire R; Cousins G; Norbury CF
[Ad] Endereço:Royal Holloway University of London, Egham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
[Ti] Título:Gesture Production in Language Impairment: It's Quality, Not Quantity, That Matters.
[So] Source:J Speech Lang Hear Res;60(4):969-982, 2017 04 14.
[Is] ISSN:1558-9102
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether children with language impairment (LI) use gesture to compensate for their language difficulties. Method: The present study investigated gesture accuracy and frequency in children with LI (n = 21) across gesture imitation, gesture elicitation, spontaneous narrative, and interactive problem-solving tasks, relative to typically developing (TD) peers (n = 18) and peers with low language and educational concerns (n = 21). Results: Children with LI showed weaknesses in gesture accuracy (imitation and gesture elicitation) in comparison to TD peers, but no differences in gesture rate. Children with low language only showed weaknesses in gesture imitation and used significantly more gestures than TD peers during parent-child interaction. Across the whole sample, motor abilities were significantly related to gesture accuracy but not gesture rate. In addition, children with LI produced proportionately more extending gestures, suggesting that they may use gesture to replace words that they are unable to articulate verbally. Conclusion: The results support the notion that gesture and language form a tightly linked communication system in which gesture deficits are seen alongside difficulties with spoken communication. Furthermore, it is the quality, not quantity of gestures that distinguish children with LI from typical peers.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Gestos
Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Análise de Variância
Criança
Linguagem Infantil
Pré-Escolar
Estudos de Coortes
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Comportamento Imitativo
Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/fisiopatologia
Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/psicologia
Masculino
Rememoração Mental
Destreza Motora
Narração
Relações Pais-Filho
Resolução de Problemas
Testes Psicológicos
Vocabulário
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171113
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171113
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170331
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-16-0141



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