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[PMID]:29251981
[Au] Autor:Weafer J; Gray JC; Hernandez K; Palmer AA; MacKillop J; de Wit H
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago.
[Ti] Título:Hierarchical investigation of genetic influences on response inhibition in healthy young adults.
[So] Source:Exp Clin Psychopharmacol;25(6):512-520, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:1936-2293
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Poor inhibitory control is a known risk factor for substance use disorders, making it a priority to identify the determinants of these deficits. The aim of the current study was to identify genetic associations with inhibitory control using the stop signal task in a large sample (n = 934) of healthy young adults of European ancestry. We genotyped the subjects genome-wide and then used a hierarchical approach in which we tested seven a priori single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with stop signal task performance, approximately 9,000 SNPs designated as high-value addiction (HVA) markers by the SmokeScreen array, and approximately five million genotyped and imputed SNPs, followed by a gene-based association analysis using the resultant p values. A priori SNP analyses revealed nominally significant associations between response inhibition and one locus in HTR2A (rs6313; p = .04, dominance model, uncorrected) in the same direction as prior findings. A nominally significant association was also found in one locus in ANKK1 (rs1800497; p = .03, uncorrected), although in the opposite direction of previous reports. After accounting for multiple comparisons, the HVA, genome-wide, and gene-based analyses yielded no significant findings. This study implicates variation in serotonergic and dopaminergic genes while underscoring the difficulty of detecting the influence of individual SNPs, even when biological information is used to prioritize testing. Although such small effect sizes suggest limited utility of individual SNPs in predicting risk for addiction or other impulse control disorders, they may nonetheless shed light on complex biological processes underlying poor inhibitory control. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Inibição (Psicologia)
Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética
Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/genética
Receptor 5-HT2A de Serotonina/genética
Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/genética
Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu
Feminino
Estudos de Associação Genética
Genótipo
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Fatores de Risco
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2A); EC 2.7.11.1 (ANKK1 protein, human); EC 2.7.11.1 (Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180224
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180224
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171219
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/pha0000156


  2 / 9526 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29251980
[Au] Autor:Stamates AL; Lau-Barraco C
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, Old Dominion University.
[Ti] Título:Environmental context effects on craving among consumers of caffeinated alcohol beverages: Associations with aspects of impulsivity.
[So] Source:Exp Clin Psychopharmacol;25(6):503-511, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:1936-2293
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The present study primarily sought to (a) determine the effects of environmental context on subjective ratings of craving for alcohol and caffeinated alcohol beverages (CAB) and (b) test inhibitory control, a state behavioral aspect of impulsivity, as a mediator of the association between context and craving in a sample of consumers of CAB. A secondary aim was to examine the associations between trait impulsivity and subjective craving for alcohol and CAB. Participants were 143 (67.1% female) college CAB drinkers. Participants were randomized into either a simulated bar context condition or neutral context condition and completed measures of alcohol use, CAB use, trait impulsivity, inhibitory control on a go/no-go task, and subjective craving for alcohol and CAB. Findings revealed that participants in the simulated bar condition, as compared with those in the neutral condition, reported more subjective craving for alcohol and for CAB; however, alcohol and CAB-specific craving were not different overall or as a function of context. The association between context and subjective craving for alcohol was not mediated by inhibitory control. Trait impulsivity was positively associated with alcohol and CAB-specific craving at baseline and post context exposure, and this finding was similar across both conditions. Therefore, the current investigation suggests that consumers of CAB may be sensitive to alcohol contexts as indicated by greater responses in alcohol and CAB-specific craving. However, inhibitory control did not explain this association. Future research may benefit from examining other potential mechanisms that explain the relationship between context and craving among CAB consumers. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/psicologia
Bebidas
Cafeína
Fissura
Meio Ambiente
Comportamento Impulsivo/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Sinais (Psicologia)
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Inibição (Psicologia)
Masculino
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Nome de substância:
3G6A5W338E (Caffeine)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180224
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180224
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171219
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/pha0000160


  3 / 9526 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27774612
[Au] Autor:Leduc K; Williams S; Gomez-Garibello C; Talwar V
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
[Ti] Título:The contributions of mental state understanding and executive functioning to preschool-aged children's lie-telling.
[So] Source:Br J Dev Psychol;35(2):288-302, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2044-835X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In this study, preschool-aged children's lie-telling behaviour was examined in relation to mental state understanding and executive functioning. Sixty-seven children aged between 25 and 43 months (M  = 34.80, SD = 4.39) participated in a temptation resistance paradigm (TRP). Children completed emerging ToM tasks measuring the following mental states: (1) diverse beliefs, (2) diverse desires, and (3) knowledge access. Children also completed measures of inhibitory control and working memory. In total, 63 of the 67 children peeked at the toy during the TRP, and a total of 26 of those children denied their transgression to the research assistant. Inhibitory control and understanding of knowledge access predicted lie-telling behaviour. Results are discussed in relation to a developmental model of children's lie-telling behaviour. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? The relationship between lie-telling, executive functioning, and ToM has been established in older children (aged 4 and above). Inhibitory control plays a role in young children's lie-telling (aged 2-4). Children above 3 years of age have some understanding of mental states. What does this study add? Very young children (2-3-year-olds) also possess an understanding of mental states. Mental state understanding is related to 2-3-year-old children's lie-telling behaviours and may be more predictive than inhibitory control. While the results were not significant, this study is the first to look at the unique role of working memory in very young children's lie-telling.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Infantil/fisiologia
Decepção
Função Executiva/fisiologia
Inibição (Psicologia)
Teoria da Mente/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Pré-Escolar
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180222
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180222
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/bjdp.12163


  4 / 9526 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29384946
[Au] Autor:Jang SH; Kwon HG
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan.
[Ti] Título:Severe disinhibition due to injuries of neural tracts related to emotion circuit in a patient with traumatic brain injury: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(52):e9493, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:RATIONALE: Approximately 30% of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) develop disinhibition, a condition that involves several brain structures, including the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT), we report on a patient with severe disinhibition and injuries of the amygdala, OFC, and ACC following TBI. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 27-year-old male patient suffered an in-car accident. DIAGNOSES: Since the onset of the TBI, the patient showed severe disinhibition including violence, as follows: 1) he sometimes attacked therapists and nurses with no provocation, 2) while he was laying on a bed, he shouted and kicked the bed when asked questions, and 3) during therapy with a difficult task, he behaved violently to a therapist. The subscale of disinhibition in Neuropsychiatric Inventory scored three points for severity and for distress. INTERVENTIONS: N/A. OUTCOMES: On 10-month DTT, the connectivity of amygdala to the prefrontal cortex including the medial prefrontal cortex and OFC had decreased in both hemispheres. In the prefronto-thalamic tracts, the orbitofronto-thalamic tractshad narrowed (the right hemisphere), and were non-reconstructed (the left hemisphere). Discontinuations of both anterior cingulums were observed in both hemispheres. LESSONS: Using DTT, concurrent injuries of the amygdala, OFC, and ACC were demonstrated in a patient with severe disinhibition following TBI. Our result suggests the need to assess these neural structures in patients with disinhibition after brain injury.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Lesões Encefálicas Traumáticas/complicações
Lesões Encefálicas Traumáticas/patologia
Inibição (Psicologia)
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Tonsila do Cerebelo/lesões
Lesões Encefálicas Traumáticas/diagnóstico por imagem
Imagem de Tensor de Difusão
Emoções
Giro do Cíngulo/lesões
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Córtex Pré-Frontal/lesões
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009493


  5 / 9526 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29173744
[Au] Autor:Buzzell GA; Troller-Renfree SV; Barker TV; Bowman LC; Chronis-Tuscano A; Henderson HA; Kagan J; Pine DS; Fox NA
[Ad] Endereço:University of Maryland-College Park. Electronic address: gbuzzell@umd.edu.
[Ti] Título:A Neurobehavioral Mechanism Linking Behaviorally Inhibited Temperament and Later Adolescent Social Anxiety.
[So] Source:J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry;56(12):1097-1105, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1527-5418
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: Behavioral inhibition (BI) is a temperament identified in early childhood that is a risk factor for later social anxiety. However, mechanisms underlying the development of social anxiety remain unclear. To better understand the emergence of social anxiety, longitudinal studies investigating changes at behavioral neural levels are needed. METHOD: BI was assessed in the laboratory at 2 and 3 years of age (N = 268). Children returned at 12 years, and an electroencephalogram was recorded while children performed a flanker task under 2 conditions: once while believing they were being observed by peers and once while not being observed. This methodology isolated changes in error monitoring (error-related negativity) and behavior (post-error reaction time slowing) as a function of social context. At 12 years, current social anxiety symptoms and lifetime diagnoses of social anxiety were obtained. RESULTS: Childhood BI prospectively predicted social-specific error-related negativity increases and social anxiety symptoms in adolescence; these symptoms directly related to clinical diagnoses. Serial mediation analysis showed that social error-related negativity changes explained relations between BI and social anxiety symptoms (n = 107) and diagnosis (n = 92), but only insofar as social context also led to increased post-error reaction time slowing (a measure of error preoccupation); this model was not significantly related to generalized anxiety. CONCLUSION: Results extend prior work on socially induced changes in error monitoring and error preoccupation. These measures could index a neurobehavioral mechanism linking BI to adolescent social anxiety symptoms and diagnosis. This mechanism could relate more strongly to social than to generalized anxiety in the peri-adolescent period.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento do Adolescente/fisiologia
Transtornos de Ansiedade/etiologia
Ansiedade/etiologia
Comportamento Infantil/fisiologia
Inibição (Psicologia)
Temperamento/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Comportamento do Adolescente/psicologia
Ansiedade/diagnóstico
Ansiedade/fisiopatologia
Ansiedade/psicologia
Transtornos de Ansiedade/diagnóstico
Transtornos de Ansiedade/fisiopatologia
Transtornos de Ansiedade/psicologia
Criança
Comportamento Infantil/psicologia
Eletroencefalografia
Potenciais Evocados
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Estudos Prospectivos
Escalas de Graduação Psiquiátrica
Fatores de Risco
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180202
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180202
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  6 / 9526 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27771330
[Au] Autor:Rothkegel LO; Trukenbrod HA; Schütt HH; Wichmann FA; Engbert R
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology & Cognitive Science Program, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24-25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany. Electronic address: lrothkeg@uni-potsdam.de.
[Ti] Título:Influence of initial fixation position in scene viewing.
[So] Source:Vision Res;129:33-49, 2016 12.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5646
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:During scene perception our eyes generate complex sequences of fixations. Predictors of fixation locations are bottom-up factors such as luminance contrast, top-down factors like viewing instruction, and systematic biases, e.g., the tendency to place fixations near the center of an image. However, comparatively little is known about the dynamics of scanpaths after experimental manipulation of specific fixation locations. Here we investigate the influence of initial fixation position on subsequent eye-movement behavior on an image. We presented 64 colored photographs to participants who started their scanpaths from one of two experimentally controlled positions in the right or left part of an image. Additionally, we used computational models to predict the images' fixation locations and classified them as balanced images or images with high conspicuity on either the left or right side of a picture. The manipulation of the starting position influenced viewing behavior for several seconds and produced a tendency to overshoot to the image side opposite to the starting position. Possible mechanisms for the generation of this overshoot were investigated using numerical simulations of statistical and dynamical models. Our model comparisons show that inhibitory tagging is a viable mechanism for dynamical planning of scanpaths.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atenção/fisiologia
Fixação Ocular/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Análise de Variância
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Inibição (Psicologia)
Masculino
Estimulação Luminosa/métodos
Movimentos Sacádicos/fisiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171222
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171222
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161107
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 9526 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27776562
[Au] Autor:Grillon C; Robinson OJ; O'Connell K; Davis A; Alvarez G; Pine DS; Ernst M
[Ad] Endereço:Section on Neurobiology of Fear and Anxiety,National Institute of Mental Health,National Institutes of Health,Bethesda,MD,USA.
[Ti] Título:Clinical anxiety promotes excessive response inhibition.
[So] Source:Psychol Med;47(3):484-494, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1469-8978
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Laboratory tasks to delineate anxiety disorder features are used to refine classification and inform our understanding of etiological mechanisms. The present study examines laboratory measures of response inhibition, specifically the inhibition of a pre-potent motor response, in clinical anxiety. Data on associations between anxiety and response inhibition remain inconsistent, perhaps because of dissociable effects of clinical anxiety and experimentally manipulated state anxiety. Few studies directly assess the independent and interacting effects of these two anxiety types (state v. disorder) on response inhibition. The current study accomplished this goal, by manipulating state anxiety in healthy and clinically anxious individuals while they complete a response inhibition task. METHOD: The study employs the threat-of-shock paradigm, one of the best-established manipulations for robustly increasing state anxiety. Participants included 82 adults (41 healthy; 41 patients with an anxiety disorder). A go/nogo task with highly frequent go trials was administered during alternating periods of safety and shock threat. Signal detection theory was used to quantify response bias and signal-detection sensitivity. RESULTS: There were independent effects of anxiety and clinical anxiety on response inhibition. In both groups, heightened anxiety facilitated response inhibition, leading to reduced nogo commission errors. Compared with the healthy group, clinical anxiety was associated with excessive response inhibition and increased go omission errors in both the safe and threat conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Response inhibition and its impact on go omission errors appear to be a promising behavioral marker of clinical anxiety. These results have implications for a dimensional view of clinical anxiety.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtornos de Ansiedade/fisiopatologia
Medo/fisiologia
Inibição (Psicologia)
Desempenho Psicomotor/fisiologia
Detecção de Sinal Psicológico/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Biomarcadores
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Biomarkers)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171128
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171128
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0033291716002555


  8 / 9526 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29065184
[Au] Autor:Littman R; Takács Á
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Clinical Psychology and Addictology, Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Izabella utca 46., Hungary.
[Ti] Título:Do all inhibitions act alike? A study of go/no-go and stop-signal paradigms.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0186774, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Response inhibition is frequently measured by the Go/no-go and Stop-signal tasks. These two are often used indiscriminately under the assumption that both measure similar inhibitory control abilities. However, accumulating evidence show differences in both tasks' modulations, raising the question of whether they tap into equivalent cognitive mechanisms. In the current study, a comparison of the performance in both tasks took place under the influence of negative stimuli, following the assumption that ''controlled inhibition'', as measured by Stop-signal, but not ''automatic inhibition'', as measured by Go/no-go, will be affected. 54 young adults performed a task in which negative pictures, neutral pictures or no-pictures preceded go trials, no-go trials, and stop-trials. While the exposure to negative pictures impaired performance on go trials and improved the inhibitory capacity in Stop-signal task, the inhibitory performance in Go/no-go task was generally unaffected. The results support the conceptualization of different mechanisms operated by both tasks, thus emphasizing the necessity to thoroughly fathom both inhibitory processes and identify their corresponding cognitive measures. Implications regarding the usage of cognitive tasks for strengthening inhibitory capacity among individuals struggling with inhibitory impairments are discussed.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Inibição (Psicologia)
Tempo de Reação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Análise e Desempenho de Tarefas
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171113
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171113
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0186774


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[PMID]:28887387
[Au] Autor:Sebastian A; Rössler K; Wibral M; Mobascher A; Lieb K; Jung P; Tüscher O
[Ad] Endereço:Emotion Regulation and Impulse Control Group, Focus Program Translational Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, 55131 Mainz, Germany, and alexandra.sebastian@unimedizin-mainz.de.
[Ti] Título:Neural Architecture of Selective Stopping Strategies: Distinct Brain Activity Patterns Are Associated with Attentional Capture But Not with Outright Stopping.
[So] Source:J Neurosci;37(40):9785-9794, 2017 Oct 04.
[Is] ISSN:1529-2401
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In stimulus-selective stop-signal tasks, the salient stop signal needs attentional processing before genuine response inhibition is completed. Differential prefrontal involvement in attentional capture and response inhibition has been linked to the right inferior frontal junction (IFJ) and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), respectively. Recently, it has been suggested that stimulus-selective stopping may be accomplished by the following different strategies: individuals may selectively inhibit their response only upon detecting a stop signal (independent discriminate then stop strategy) or unselectively whenever detecting a stop or attentional capture signal (stop then discriminate strategy). Alternatively, the discrimination process of the critical signal (stop vs attentional capture signal) may interact with the go process (dependent discriminate then stop strategy). Those different strategies might differentially involve attention- and stopping-related processes that might be implemented by divergent neural networks. This should lead to divergent activation patterns and, if disregarded, interfere with analyses in neuroimaging studies. To clarify this crucial issue, we studied 87 human participants of both sexes during a stimulus-selective stop-signal task and performed strategy-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging analyses. We found that, regardless of the strategy applied, outright stopping displayed indistinguishable brain activation patterns. However, during attentional capture different strategies resulted in divergent neural activation patterns with variable activation of right IFJ and bilateral VLPFC. In conclusion, the neural network involved in outright stopping is ubiquitous and independent of strategy, while different strategies impact on attention-related processes and underlying neural network usage. Strategic differences should therefore be taken into account particularly when studying attention-related processes in stimulus-selective stopping. Dissociating inhibition from attention has been a major challenge for the cognitive neuroscience of executive functions. Selective stopping tasks have been instrumental in addressing this question. However, recent theoretical, cognitive and behavioral research suggests that different strategies are applied in successful execution of the task. The underlying strategy-dependent neural networks might differ substantially. Here, we show evidence that, regardless of the strategy used, the neural network involved in outright stopping is ubiquitous. However, significant differences can only be found in the attention-related processes underlying those different strategies. Thus, when studying attentional processing of salient stop signals, strategic differences should be considered. In contrast, the neural networks implementing outright stopping seem less or not at all affected by strategic differences.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atenção/fisiologia
Mapeamento Encefálico/métodos
Encéfalo/fisiologia
Inibição (Psicologia)
Rede Nervosa/fisiologia
Desempenho Psicomotor/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Função Executiva/fisiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Distribuição Aleatória
Tempo de Reação/fisiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171012
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171012
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170910
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1476-17.2017


  10 / 9526 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28877232
[Au] Autor:Tsukamoto H; Suga T; Takenaka S; Takeuchi T; Tanaka D; Hamaoka T; Hashimoto T; Isaka T
[Ad] Endereço:Research Organization of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, Shiga, Japan.
[Ti] Título:An acute bout of localized resistance exercise can rapidly improve inhibitory control.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(9):e0184075, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The positive effect of acute resistance exercise on executive function, such as inhibitory control (IC), is poorly understood. Several previous studies have demonstrated this effect using whole-body resistance exercise. However, it remains unclear whether localized resistance exercise performed using only limited muscle groups could also acutely improve IC. Thus, the present study examined the effect of an acute bout of localized resistance exercise on IC. Twelve healthy men performed a color-word Stroop task (CWST) before and immediately after the experimental conditions, which consisted of 2 resistance exercises and a resting control (CON). Bilateral knee extension was used to create 2 resistance exercise conditions: light-intensity resistance exercise (LRE) and high-intensity resistance exercise (HRE) conditions, which were 40% and 80% of one-repetition maximum, respectively. The resistance exercise session was programmed for 6 sets with 10 repetitions per set. The CWST-measured IC was significantly improved immediately after both LRE and HRE, but it did not improve immediately after CON. However, the improved IC was significantly greater in HRE than in LRE. The present findings showed that IC could be rapidly improved by an acute bout of localized resistance exercise, especially with high-intensity. Therefore, we suggest that in addition to whole-body resistance exercise, localized resistance exercise performed using limited muscle groups may be sufficient for improving IC.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Inibição (Psicologia)
Treinamento de Resistência
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Função Executiva
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Esforço Físico
Teste de Stroop
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171006
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171006
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170907
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0184075



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