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  1 / 1222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27779434
[Au] Autor:Parker LJ; Hunte H; Ohmit A; Furr-Holden D; Thorpe RJ
[Ad] Endereço:a Program for Research on Men's Health , Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health , Baltimore , Maryland , USA.
[Ti] Título:The Effects of Discrimination Are Associated With Cigarette Smoking Among Black Males.
[So] Source:Subst Use Misuse;52(3):383-391, 2017 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2491
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Previous research has demonstrated that experiencing interpersonal discrimination is associated with cigarette smoking. Few studies have examined the relationship between the effects of physical and emotional discrimination and cigarette usage, and none have examined this relationship among Black men. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the effects of physical and emotional discrimination and cigarette smoking. METHODS: Data from the Indiana Black Men's Health Study, a community-based sample of adult Black men, was used to conduct multivariate logistic regression to examine the relationship between the physical and emotional effects of discrimination and smoking, net of healthcare and workplace discrimination, age, education, household income, and being married. RESULTS: After adjusting for having an emotional response to discrimination, health care and workplace discrimination, age, education, household income, and being married, males who had a physical response to discrimination (e.g., upset stomach or headache) had higher odds of cigarette use (odds ratio (OR): 1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15-3.30) than men who did not have a physical response to discrimination. CONCLUSION: Findings from the study suggest that Black males may use cigarette smoking as a means to mitigate the stress associated with experiences of discrimination. Future research is needed further to explore if and how Black males use cigarette smoking to cope with unfair treatment.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Afroamericanos/estatística & dados numéricos
Racismo/psicologia
Fumar/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Afroamericanos/psicologia
Seres Humanos
Indiana/epidemiologia
Masculino
Racismo/estatística & dados numéricos
Fatores de Risco
Fumar/psicologia
Inquéritos e Questionários
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180228
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180228
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/10826084.2016.1228678


  2 / 1222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29351345
[Au] Autor:Everaert T; Spruyt A; De Houwer J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Experimental-Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
[Ti] Título:To IMPRES or to EXPRES? Exploiting comparative judgments to measure and visualize implicit and explicit preferences.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191302, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We introduce an adaptation of the affect misattribution procedure (AMP), called the implicit preference scale (IMPRES). Participants who complete the IMPRES indicate their preference for one of two, simultaneously presented Chinese ideographs. Each ideograph is preceded by a briefly presented prime stimulus that is irrelevant to the task. Participants are hypothesized to prefer the ideograph that is preceded by the prime they prefer. In the present research, the IMPRES was designed to capture racial attitudes (preferences for white versus black faces) and age-related attitudes (preferences for young versus old faces). Results suggest that (a) the reliability of the IMPRES is similar (or even better) than the reliability of the AMP and (b) that the IMPRES and the AMP correlate significantly. However, neither the AMP nor the IMPRES were found to predict attitude-related outcome behavior (i.e., the preparedness to donate money to a charity benefiting ethnic minorities vs. the elderly). Further research is thus necessary to establish the validity of the IMPRES. Finally, we demonstrated that, unlike the AMP, the IMPRES allows for an in-depth assessment of unanticipated response patterns and/or extreme observations using multidimensional scaling algorithms.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento
Julgamento
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Atitude
Face
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Racismo/psicologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191302


  3 / 1222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28459274
[Au] Autor:Qian MK; Quinn PC; Heyman GD; Pascalis O; Fu G; Lee K
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, Hangzhou Normal University.
[Ti] Título:Perceptual individuation training (but not mere exposure) reduces implicit racial bias in preschool children.
[So] Source:Dev Psychol;53(5):845-859, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1939-0599
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Two studies with preschool-age children examined the effectiveness of perceptual individuation training at reducing racial bias (Study 1, N = 32; Study 2, N = 56). We found that training preschool-age children to individuate other-race faces resulted in a reduction in implicit racial bias while mere exposure to other-race faces produced no such effect. We also showed that neither individuation training nor mere exposure reduced explicit racial bias. Theoretically, our findings provide strong evidence for a causal link between individual-level face processing and implicit racial bias, and are consistent with the newly proposed perceptual-social linkage hypothesis. Practically, our findings suggest that offering children experiences that allow them to increase their expertise in processing individual other-race faces will help reduce their implicit racial bias. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Infantil/fisiologia
Reconhecimento Facial/fisiologia
Individuação
Aprendizagem/fisiologia
Racismo/psicologia
Percepção Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Criança
Pré-Escolar
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180222
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180222
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/dev0000290


  4 / 1222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29195524
[Au] Autor:Nelson S
[Ad] Endereço:Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, UJSA.
[Ti] Título:Race, Racism, and Health Disparities: What Can I Do About It?
[So] Source:Creat Nurs;22(3):161-165, 2016 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:1078-4535
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Disparities based on race that target communities of color are consistently reported in the management of many diseases. Barriers to health care equity include the health care system, the patient, the community, and health care providers. This article focuses on the health care system as well as health care providers and how racism and our implicit biases affect our medical decision making. Health care providers receive little or no training on issues of race and racism. As a result, awareness of racism and its impact on health care delivery is low. I will discuss a training module that helps improve awareness around these issues. Until racial issues are honestly addressed by members of the health care team, it is unlikely that we will see significant improvements in racial health care disparities for Americans.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Afroamericanos/psicologia
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde
Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia
Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/etnologia
Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde
Racismo/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Recém-Nascido
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde/organização & administração
Estados Unidos
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1891/1078-4535.22.3.161


  5 / 1222 MEDLINE  
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Texto completo SciELO Saúde Pública
[PMID]:28453106
[Au] Autor:Campo-Arias A; Herazo E; Oviedo HC
[Ad] Endereço:Universidad del Magdalena, Santa Marta, Colombia, acampoa@unimagdalena.edu.co.
[Ti] Título:[Psychometric assessment of a brief Modern Racism Scale].
[Ti] Título:Valoración psicométrica de la Escala Breve para Racismo Moderno..
[So] Source:Rev Salud Publica (Bogota);18(3):437-446, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0124-0064
[Cp] País de publicação:Colombia
[La] Idioma:spa
[Ab] Resumo:Objective To find the internal consistency of the Modern Racism Scale (MRS) among medical students in Bucaramanga, Colombia. Methods A total of 352 medical students, mean age=20.0 years (SD=1.9) reported their attitudes towards Afro-Colombians; 59.4 % were women. Students completed the 10-item version of MRS. Cronbach alpha and McDonald omega were calculated. Exploratory factor analyses were done to propose a brief version of the MRS. Results The 10-item version showed a Cronbach alpha of 0.48 and a McDonald omega of 0.15. The short version, the Brief Modern Racism Scale (BMRS) (items 1, 4, 5, 7 and 8) presented a Cronbach alpha of 0.64 and McDonald omega of 0.65. The BMRS showed one salient factor responsible of 41.6 % of the total variance. Conclusions A Spanish-language short version of the MRS shows better psychometric performance than the original version. Further study is needed to corroborate these findings or make adjustments for Colombian cultural regions.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano
Atitude
Racismo/psicologia
Inquéritos e Questionários
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Colômbia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Linguagem
Masculino
Psicometria
Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180215
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180215
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  6 / 1222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29253855
[Au] Autor:Ben J; Cormack D; Harris R; Paradies Y
[Ad] Endereço:Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalization, Faculty of Arts and Education, Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
[Ti] Título:Racism and health service utilisation: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189900, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Although racism has been posited as driver of racial/ethnic inequities in healthcare, the relationship between racism and health service use and experience has yet to be systematically reviewed or meta-analysed. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of quantitative empirical studies that report associations between self-reported racism and various measures of healthcare service utilisation. Data were reviewed and extracted from 83 papers reporting 70 studies. Studies included 250,850 participants and were conducted predominately in the U.S. The meta-analysis included 59 papers reporting 52 studies, which were analysed using random effects models and mean weighted effect sizes. Racism was associated with more negative patient experiences of health services (HSU-E) (OR = 0.351 (95% CI [0.236,0.521], k = 19), including lower levels of healthcare-related trust, satisfaction, and communication. Racism was not associated with health service use (HSU-U) as an outcome group, and was not associated with most individual HSU-U outcomes, including having had examinations, health service visits and admissions to health professionals and services. Racism was associated with health service use outcomes such as delaying/not getting healthcare, and lack of adherence to treatment uptake, although these effects may be influenced by a small sample of studies, and publication bias, respectively. Limitations to the literature reviewed in terms of study designs, sampling methods and measurements are discussed along with suggested future directions in the field.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Assistência à Saúde/utilização
Pesquisa sobre Serviços de Saúde
Preconceito
Racismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Comunicação
Grupos Étnicos
Feminino
Pessoal de Saúde
Serviços de Saúde/utilização
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Razão de Chances
Avaliação de Resultados (Cuidados de Saúde)
Cooperação do Paciente
Satisfação do Paciente
Resultado do Tratamento
Estados Unidos
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180112
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180112
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171219
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189900


  7 / 1222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29206008
[Au] Autor:Campos R; Novella E
[Ti] Título:Mental hygiene in early Francoism: from racial hygiene to the prevention of mental illness (1939-1960).
[So] Source:Dynamis;37(1):65-87, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0211-9536
[Cp] País de publicação:Spain
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In this paper, we study the ideological bases of mental hygiene, understood as racial and moral hygiene, during the first years of Franco's regime and their evolution until 1960. First, we discuss the conceptualization of mental hygiene in the 1940s and its role as a tool for the legitimization of dictatorship, revealing the involvement of orthodox Catholicism and its links with moral and racial hygiene. Second, we assess the transformation of mental hygiene during the 1950s towards modernization and a stronger linkage with the dominant trends of contemporary psychiatry without ever leaving the ideological background of Catholicism. For this purpose, we will focus on analysis of the activities of the Mental Hygiene Week held in Barcelona in 1954 and on the creation in 1955 of the National Board of Psychiatric Care, which took on mental hygiene as one of its functions. This paper shows the close relationship of mental hygiene during the early years of Francoism with the political principles of the Dictatorship. The 1940s witnessed the deployment of a harsh discourse in which mental hygiene was a tool for the (moral and spiritual) education of the Spanish people in the political principles of the "New State", pathologizing political dissent and ideologically purifying the country. In the 1950s, Francoist mental hygiene underwent a process of aggiornamento marked by international political events following the defeat of fascism in World War II, advancing a project for (authoritarian) modernization in an international context already directed towards mental health.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fascismo
Transtornos Mentais/história
Saúde Mental/história
Psiquiatria/história
Racismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Catolicismo
História do Século XX
Transtornos Mentais/prevenção & controle
Religião e Ciência
Espanha
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171228
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171228
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:QIS
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 1222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29229131
[Au] Autor:Jang S; Mandabach M; Aburjania Z; Balentine CJ; Chen H
[Ad] Endereço:Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Birmingham, Alabama; Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
[Ti] Título:Racial disparities in the cost of surgical care for parathyroidectomy.
[So] Source:J Surg Res;221:216-221, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8673
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Parathyroidectomy is the only curative therapy for hyperparathyroidism, but its cost and variation in use among different racial and ethnic groups are largely unexamined. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between race and ethnicity and the total hospital cost of parathyroidectomy. METHODS: This retrospective study included 899 consecutive complete parathyroidectomies in our institution between September 2011 and July 2016. Total length of stay and cost were primary outcomes. Nonparametric and chi-square tests were used for analysis. RESULTS: The study population was 66.4% Caucasian, 31.4% African American, 0.7% Hispanic, and 0.3% Asian. Total hospital costs were greater for African-American patients ($6154.87 ± 389.18) compared to Caucasian patients ($5253.28 ± $91.74). Mean length of stay was 0.99 ± 0.18 for African-American patients and 0.44 ± 0.05 for Caucasian patients. African-American patients were more likely than Caucasian patients to be readmitted (4.6% versus 1.2%). Among African Americans, males had a more expensive hospital cost, higher incidence of cases that cost greater than $10,000, and longer length of stay compared to females. CONCLUSIONS: African-American race was associated with higher hospital costs for parathyroidectomy compared to Caucasian patients, especially male patients. The increased cost could be explained in part by longer length of stay. More detailed efforts are needed to reduce racial disparity in the management of parathyroidectomy patients.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde
Paratireoidectomia/economia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Idoso
Feminino
Custos Hospitalares
Seres Humanos
Tempo de Internação
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Racismo
Estudos Retrospectivos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171219
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171219
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171213
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 1222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29065029
[Au] Autor:Zaidi Z; Vyas R; Verstegen D; Morahan P; Dornan T
[Ad] Endereço:Z. Zaidi is associate professor, Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida; ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4328-5766. R. Vyas is assistant vice president, Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER Education), FAIMER, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. D. Verstegen is assistant professor, Department of Educational Research and Development, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. P. Morahan is professor emerita, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. T. Dornan is professor, Queen's University, Belfast, Northern Ireland.
[Ti] Título:Medical Education to Enhance Critical Consciousness: Facilitators' Experiences.
[So] Source:Acad Med;92(11S Association of American Medical Colleges Learn Serve Lead: Proceedings of the 56th Annual Research in Medical Education Sessions):S93-S99, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1938-808X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PURPOSE: To analyze educators' experiences of facilitating cultural discussions in two global health professions education programs and what these experiences had taught them about critical consciousness. METHOD: A multicultural research team conducted in-depth interviews with 16 faculty who had extensive experience facilitating cultural discussions. They analyzed transcripts of the interviews thematically, drawing sensitizing insights from Gramsci's theory of cultural hegemony. Collaboration and conversation helped the team self-consciously examine their positions toward the data set and be critically reflexive. RESULTS: Participant faculty used their prior experience facilitating cultural discussions to create a "safe space" in which learners could develop critical consciousness. During multicultural interactions they recognized and explicitly addressed issues related to power differentials, racism, implicit bias, and gender bias. They noted the need to be "facile in attending to pain" as learners brought up traumatic experiences and other sensitive issues including racism and the impact of power dynamics. They built relationships with learners by juxtaposing and exploring the sometimes-conflicting norms of different cultures. Participants were reflective about their own understanding and tendency to be biased. They aimed to break free of such biases while role modeling how to have the courage to speak up. CONCLUSIONS: Experience had given facilitators in multicultural programs an understanding of their responsibility to promote critical consciousness and social justice. How faculty without prior experience or expertise could develop those values and skills is a topic for future research.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Competência Cultural
Diversidade Cultural
Docentes de Medicina
Poder (Psicologia)
Pensamento
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Estado de Consciência
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Pesquisa Qualitativa
Racismo
Sexismo
Justiça Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171030
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171030
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/ACM.0000000000001907


  10 / 1222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29065016
[Au] Autor:Karani R; Varpio L; May W; Horsley T; Chenault J; Miller KH; O'Brien B
[Ad] Endereço:R. Karani is senior associate dean for undergraduate medical education and curricular affairs and professor of medical education, medicine and geriatrics and palliative medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. L. Varpio is associate professor, Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. W. May is director and professor, Clinical Skills Education and Evaluation Center, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California. T. Horsley is associate director, Research Unit, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. J. Chenault is associate professor, Reference Department, Kornhauser Health Sciences Library, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky. K.H. Miller is 2017 chair, Research in Medical Education Program Planning Committee, and associate professor of graduate medical education, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky. B. O'Brien is associate professor, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
[Ti] Título:Commentary: Racism and Bias in Health Professions Education: How Educators, Faculty Developers, and Researchers Can Make a Difference.
[So] Source:Acad Med;92(11S Association of American Medical Colleges Learn Serve Lead: Proceedings of the 56th Annual Research in Medical Education Sessions):S1-S6, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1938-808X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The Research in Medical Education (RIME) Program Planning Committee is committed to advancing scholarship in and promoting dialogue about the critical issues of racism and bias in health professions education (HPE). From the call for studies focused on underrepresented learners and faculty in medicine to the invited 2016 RIME plenary address by Dr. Camara Jones, the committee strongly believes that dismantling racism is critical to the future of HPE.The evidence is glaring: Dramatic racial and ethnic health disparities persist in the United States, people of color remain deeply underrepresented in medical school and academic health systems as faculty, learner experiences across the medical education continuum are fraught with bias, and current approaches to teaching perpetuate stereotypes and insufficiently challenge structural inequities. To achieve racial justice in HPE, academic medicine must commit to leveraging positions of influence and contributing from these positions. In this Commentary, the authors consider three roles (educator, faculty developer, and researcher) represented by the community of scholars and pose potential research questions as well as suggestions for advancing educational research relevant to eliminating racism and bias in HPE.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Educação Médica
Docentes de Medicina
Racismo
Pesquisadores
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Centros Médicos Acadêmicos
Currículo
Ocupações em Saúde/educação
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171030
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171030
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/ACM.0000000000001928



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