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[PMID]:29380883
[Au] Autor:Allan ATL; Hill RA
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Dawson Building, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:What have we been looking at? A call for consistency in studies of primate vigilance.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;165 Suppl 65:4-22, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Vigilance functions to detect threats. In primates, these threats emerge from both predators and conspecifics, but a host of other social, demographic, and ecological factors have been shown to influence primate vigilance patterns. The primate vigilance literature is thus characterized by considerable variation in findings, with inconsistent or contradictory results reported not only across different species but also within species and populations across studies. Some of this variation could emerge from fundamental differences in the methods employed, making comparisons across species and groups challenging. Furthermore, identifying consistent behavioral markers for the state of vigilance appears to have proved challenging in primates, leading to a range of definitions being developed. Deviation at this level leads directly into concomitant variation at the level of sampling methodologies. As a result, the primate vigilance literature currently presents a diverse series of approaches to exploring subtly different behaviors and phenomena. This review calls for a greater consistency in studying vigilance, with the aim of encouraging future research to follow similar principles leading to more comparable results. Identifying whether an animal is in a vigilant state is challenging for most field researchers; identifying and recording a more general behavior of "looking" should though be more achievable. Experimental approaches could then be employed to understand the compatibility "looking" has with predator detection (and other threats) in individual study systems. The outcome of this approach will allow researchers to understand the key determinants of looking in their study groups and explore threat detection probabilities given an individual or group's relative level of looking.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Antropologia Física/métodos
Antropologia Física/normas
Comportamento Predatório/fisiologia
Primatas/fisiologia
Projetos de Pesquisa/normas
Predomínio Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23381


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[PMID]:29049358
[Au] Autor:Radke HRM; Hornsey MJ; Sibley CG; Thai M; Barlow FK
[Ad] Endereço:Institute for Psychology, University of Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Is the racial composition of your surroundings associated with your levels of social dominance orientation?
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0186612, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We investigate the extent to which minority group members are surrounded by outgroup members in their immediate environment as a predictor of social dominance orientation. Using a large representative sample of New Zealanders, we found that minority group members in outgroup dense environments reported lower levels of social dominance orientation (Study 1). In studies 2 and 3, Asian Australian and Black American participants who were surrounded by outgroup members reported lower social dominance orientation. For majority group (White) participants there was no association between social dominance orientation and outgroup density. Study 4 explained the overall pattern: Black Americans surrounded by outgroup members perceived their group to be of lower status in their immediate environment, and through this, reported lower social dominance orientation. This article adds to growing literature on contextual factors that predict social dominance orientation, especially among minority group members.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Grupos de Populações Continentais
Predomínio Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Grupos Étnicos
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Nova Zelândia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171109
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171109
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171020
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0186612


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[PMID]:28981540
[Au] Autor:Lamb CT; Mowat G; Gilbert SL; McLellan BN; Nielsen SE; Boutin S
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
[Ti] Título:Density-dependent signaling: An alternative hypothesis on the function of chemical signaling in a non-territorial solitary carnivore.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0184176, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Brown bears are known to use rubbing behavior as a means of chemical communication, but the function of this signaling is unclear. One hypothesis that has gained support is that male bears rub to communicate dominance to other males. We tested the communication of dominance hypothesis in a low-density brown bear population in southeast British Columbia. We contrasted rubbing rates for male and female bears during and after the breeding season using ten years of DNA-mark-recapture data for 643 individuals. Here we demonstrate that male brown bears rub 60% more during the breeding than the non-breeding season, while female rubbing had no seasonal trends. Per capita rub rates by males were, on average, 2.7 times higher than females. Our results suggest that the function of rubbing in the Rocky Mountains may not only be to communicate dominance, but also to self-advertise for mate attraction. We propose that the role of chemical communication in this species may be density-dependent, where the need to self-advertise for mating is inversely related to population density and communicating for dominance increases with population density. We suggest that future endeavors to elucidate the function of rubbing should sample the behavior across a range of population densities using camera trap and genotypic data.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comunicação Animal
Reprodução/fisiologia
Comportamento Sexual Animal/fisiologia
Predomínio Social
Ursidae/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Colúmbia Britânica
Feminino
Masculino
Densidade Demográfica
Estações do Ano
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171022
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171022
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171006
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0184176


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[PMID]:28889990
[Au] Autor:Okosun OO; Pirk CWW; Crewe RM; Yusuf AA
[Ad] Endereço:Social Insects Research Group, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield, 0028 Pretoria, South Africa. Electronic address: bimpy@zoology.up.ac.za.
[Ti] Título:Glandular sources of pheromones used to control host workers (Apis mellifera scutellata) by socially parasitic workers of Apis mellifera capensis.
[So] Source:J Insect Physiol;102:42-49, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1611
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Pheromonal control by the honey bee queen is achieved through the use of secretions from diverse glandular sources, but the use of pheromones from a variety of glandular sources by reproductively dominant workers, has not previously been explored. Using the social parasite, Apis mellifera capensis clonal worker we studied the diversity of glandular sources used for pheromonal control of reproductively subordinate A. m. scutellata workers. To determine whether pheromones from different glandular sources are used by reproductively active workers to achieve dominance and evaluate the degree of pheromonal competition between workers of the two sub-species, we housed groups of workers of the two sub-species together in cages and analysed mandibular and tergal gland secretions as well as, ovarian activation status of each worker after 21days. The results showed that A. m. capensis invasive clones used both mandibular and tergal gland secretions to achieve reproductive dominance and suppress ovarian activation in their A. m. scutellata host workers. The reproductively dominant workers (false queens) produced more queen-like pheromones and inhibited ovarian activation in subordinate A. m. scutellata workers. These results show that tergal gland pheromones working in synergy with pheromones from other glands allow individual workers (false queens) to establish reproductive dominance within these social groups and to act in a manner similar to that of queens. Thus suggesting that, the evolution of reproductively dominant individuals (queens or false queens) and subordinate individuals (workers) in social insects like the honey bee is the result of a complex interplay of pheromonal signals from different exocrine glands.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Abelhas/fisiologia
Abelhas/parasitologia
Interações Hospedeiro-Parasita
Feromônios/secreção
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Glândulas Exócrinas/secreção
Reprodução
Comportamento Social
Predomínio Social
África do Sul
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Pheromones)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171025
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171025
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170912
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  5 / 4461 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28877259
[Au] Autor:Fatsini E; Rey S; Ibarra-Zatarain Z; Mackenzie S; Duncan NJ
[Ad] Endereço:IRTA, Sant Carles de la Ràpita, Tarragona, Spain.
[Ti] Título:Dominance behaviour in a non-aggressive flatfish, Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) and brain mRNA abundance of selected transcripts.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(9):e0184283, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Dominance is defined as the preferential access to limited resources. The present study aimed to characterise dominance in a non-aggressive flatfish species, the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) by 1) identifying dominance categories and associated behaviours and 2) linking dominance categories (dominant and subordinate) with the abundance of selected mRNA transcripts in the brain. Early juveniles (n = 74, 37 pairs) were subjected to a dyadic dominance test, related to feeding, and once behavioural phenotypes had been described the abundance of ten selected mRNAs related to dominance and aggressiveness was measured in the brain. Late juveniles were subjected to two dyadic dominance tests (n = 34, 17 pairs), related to feeding and territoriality and one group test (n = 24, 4 groups of 6 fish). Sole feeding first were categorized as dominant and sole feeding second or not feeding as subordinate. Three social behaviours (i. "Resting the head" on another fish, ii. "Approaching" another fish, iii. "Swimming above another" fish) were associated with dominance of feeding. Two other variables (i. Total time occupying the preferred area during the last 2 hours of the 24 h test, ii. Organisms occupying the preferred area when the test ended) were representative of dominance in the place preference test. In all tests, dominant fish compared to subordinate fish displayed a significantly higher number of the behaviours "Rest the head" and "Approaches". Moreover, dominant sole dominated the sand at the end of the test, and in the group test dominated the area close to the feed delivery point before feed was delivered. The mRNA abundance of the selected mRNAs related to neurogenesis (nrd2) and neuroplasticity (c-fos) in dominant sole compared to subordinate were significantly different. This is the first study to characterise dominance categories with associated behaviours and mRNA abundance in Senegalese sole and provides tools to study dominance related problems in feeding and reproduction in aquaculture.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal
Encéfalo/metabolismo
Linguados/fisiologia
Regulação da Expressão Gênica
Predomínio Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Agressão
Animais
Comportamento Alimentar
Perfilação da Expressão Gênica
Neurogênese
Plasticidade Neuronal
Análise de Componente Principal
RNA Mensageiro/metabolismo
Natação
Territorialidade
Gravação em Vídeo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (RNA, Messenger)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171023
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171023
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170907
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0184283


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[PMID]:28850589
[Au] Autor:Wood A; Martin J; Niedenthal P
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Towards a social functional account of laughter: Acoustic features convey reward, affiliation, and dominance.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(8):e0183811, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Recent work has identified the physical features of smiles that accomplish three tasks fundamental to human social living: rewarding behavior, establishing and managing affiliative bonds, and negotiating social status. The current work extends the social functional account to laughter. Participants (N = 762) rated the degree to which reward, affiliation, or dominance (between-subjects) was conveyed by 400 laughter samples acquired from a commercial sound effects website. Inclusion of a fourth rating dimension, spontaneity, allowed us to situate the current approach in the context of existing laughter research, which emphasizes the distinction between spontaneous and volitional laughter. We used 11 acoustic properties extracted from the laugh samples to predict participants' ratings. Actor sex moderated, and sometimes even reversed, the relation between acoustics and participants' judgments. Spontaneous laughter appears to serve the reward function in the current framework, as similar acoustic properties guided perceiver judgments of spontaneity and reward: reduced voicing and increased pitch, increased duration for female actors, and increased pitch slope, center of gravity, first formant, and noisiness for male actors. Affiliation ratings diverged from reward in their sex-dependent relationship to intensity and, for females, reduced pitch range and raised second formant. Dominance displayed the most distinct pattern of acoustic predictors, including increased pitch range, reduced second formant in females, and decreased pitch variability in males. We relate the current findings to existing findings on laughter and human and non-human vocalizations, concluding laughter can signal much more that felt or faked amusement.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Riso/psicologia
Recompensa
Predomínio Social
Identificação Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Acústica
Adulto
Idoso
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Fatores Sexuais
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171019
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171019
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170830
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0183811


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[PMID]:28832918
[Au] Autor:Seil SK; Hannibal DL; Beisner BA; McCowan B
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Population Health & Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis, Davis, California, 95616.
[Ti] Título:Predictors of insubordinate aggression among captive female rhesus macaques.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;164(3):558-573, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: Cercopithicine primates tend to have nepotistic hierarchies characterized by predictable, kinship-based dominance. Although aggression is typically directed down the hierarchy, insubordinate aggression does occur. Insubordination is important to understand because it can precipitate social upheaval and undermine group stability; however, the factors underlying it are not well understood. We test whether key social and demographic variables predict insubordination among captive female rhesus macaques. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To identify factors influencing insubordination, multivariate analyses of 10,821 dyadic conflicts among rhesus macaque females were conducted, using data from six captive groups. A segmented regression analysis was used to identify dyads with insubordination. Negative binomial regression analyses and an information theoretic approach were used to assess predictors of insubordination among dyads. RESULTS: In the best models, weight difference (w = 1.0; IRR = 0.930), age (dominant: w = 1.0, IRR = 0.681; subordinate: w = 1.0, IRR = 1.069), the subordinate's total number of allies (w = 0.727, IRR = 1.060) or non-kin allies (w = 0.273, IRR = 1.165), the interaction of the dominant's kin allies and weight difference (w = 0.938, IRR = 1.046), violation of youngest ascendancy (w = 1.0; IRR = 2.727), and the subordinate's maternal support (w = 1.0; IRR = 2.928), are important predictors of insubordination. DISCUSSION: These results show that both intrinsic and social factors influence insubordinate behavior. This adds to evidence of the importance of intrinsic factors and flexibility in a social structure thought to be rigid and predetermined by external factors. Further, because insubordination can precipitate social overthrow, determining predictors of insubordination will shed light on mechanisms underlying stability in nepotistic societies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Agressão/fisiologia
Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Macaca mulatta/fisiologia
Predomínio Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Fatores Etários
Animais
Antropologia Física
Peso Corporal
Feminino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171030
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171030
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170824
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23296


  8 / 4461 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28792519
[Au] Autor:González-Alcaide G; Park J; Huamaní C; Ramos JM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of History of Science and Documentation, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
[Ti] Título:Dominance and leadership in research activities: Collaboration between countries of differing human development is reflected through authorship order and designation as corresponding authors in scientific publications.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(8):e0182513, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:INTRODUCTION: Scientific collaboration is an important mechanism that enables the integration of the least developed countries into research activities. In the present study, we use the order of author signatures and addresses for correspondence in scientific publications as variables to analyze the interactions between countries of very high (VHHD), high (HHD), medium (MHD), and low human development (LHD). METHODOLOGY: We identified all documents published between 2011 and 2015 in journals included in the Science Citation Index-Expanded categories' of Tropical Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Parasitology, and Pediatrics. We then classified the countries participating in the publications according to their Human Development Index (HDI), analyzing the international collaboration; positioning and influence of some countries over others in cooperative networks; their leadership; and the impact of the work based on the HDI and the type of collaboration. RESULTS: We observed a high degree of international collaboration in all the areas analyzed, in the case of both LHD and MHD countries. We identified numerous cooperative links between VHHD countries and MHD/LHD countries, reflecting the fact that cooperative links are an important mechanism for integrating research activities into the latter. The countries with large emerging economies, such as Brazil and China stand out due to the dominance they exert in the collaborations established with the United States, the UK, and other European countries. The analysis of the leadership role of the countries, measured by the frequency of lead authorships, shows limited participation by MHD/LHD countries. This reduced participation among less developed countries is further accentuated by their limited presence in the addresses for correspondence. We observed significant statistical differences in the degree of citation according to the HDI of the participating countries. CONCLUSIONS: The order of signatures and the address for correspondence in scientific publications are bibliographic characteristics that facilitate a precise, in-depth analysis of cooperative practices and their associations with concepts like dominance or leadership. This is useful to monitor the existing balance in research participation in health research publications.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Autoria
Países Desenvolvidos
Países em Desenvolvimento
Cooperação Internacional
Editoração
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Liderança
Infuência dos Pares
Predomínio Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171003
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171003
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170810
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0182513


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[PMID]:28673261
[Au] Autor:Zajitschek S; Herbert-Read JE; Abbasi NM; Zajitschek F; Immler S
[Ad] Endereço:School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ, Norwich, UK. susi.zajitschek@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Paternal personality and social status influence offspring activity in zebrafish.
[So] Source:BMC Evol Biol;17(1):157, 2017 Jul 03.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2148
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Evidence for the transmission of non-genetic information from father to offspring is rapidly accumulating. While the impact of chemical and physical factors such as toxins or diet on the fitness of the parents and their offspring have been studied extensively, the importance of behavioural and social circumstances has only recently been recognised. Behavioural traits such as personality characteristics can be relatively stable, and partly comprise a genetic component but we know little about the non-genetic transmission of plastic behavioural traits from parents to offspring. We investigated the relative effect of personality and of social dominance as indicators at the opposite ends of the plasticity range on offspring behaviour in the zebrafish (Danio rerio). We assessed male boldness, a behavioural trait that has previously been shown previously to possess genetic underpinnings, and experimentally manipulated male social status to assess the association between the two types of behaviour and their correlation with offspring activity. RESULTS: We found a clear interaction between the relatively stable and putative genetic effects based on inherited differences in personality and the experimentally induced epigenetic effects from changes in the social status of the father on offspring activity. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that offspring behaviour is determined by a combination of paternal personality traits and on-genetic effects derived from the social status of the father.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Modelos Animais
Comportamento Social
Peixe-Zebra/genética
Peixe-Zebra/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Animal
Epigênese Genética
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Personalidade
Predomínio Social
Espermatozoides/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171102
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171102
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170705
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12862-017-1005-0


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[PMID]:28535861
[Au] Autor:Wooddell LJ; Kaburu SS; Suomi SJ; Dettmer AM
[Ad] Endereço:Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development, NIH, Poolesville, Maryland;, Email: ljwooddell@ucdavis.edu.
[Ti] Título:Elo-rating for Tracking Rank Fluctuations after Demographic Changes Involving Semi-free-ranging Rhesus Macaques ( ).
[So] Source:J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci;56(3):260-268, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:1559-6109
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are gregarious primates that form despotic societies characterized by frequent and intense aggression. Within long-term social groups, demographic changes may influence hierarchical stability, potentially resulting in conflict and violently abrupt hierarchical changes. This conflict can result in serious implications for animal welfare, and thus, predictive tools would be invaluable to captive managers in determining social instabilities. Using the method Elo-rating to track rank changes and dominance stability, we predicted that demographic changes to a population of semi-free ranging rhesus macaques would result in changes in hierarchical stability. Over a 3 y period, dominance data were recorded on all troop members to track the hierarchy. Throughout the 3 y, significant changes occurred to the population (mainly due to health and colony management reasons; no changes specifically occurred for this study) including permanent removal of a large group of natal males, temporary and permanent removal of top-ranking females, and depositions of top-ranking families. Our retrospective study suggests that removing natal males was beneficial in promoting overall troop stability (that is, stability of dominance relationships), although remaining males opportunistically attempted to increase in rank, perhaps due to limited competition. Our results also suggest that removing top-ranking females, even temporarily, destabilized dominance relationships; consequently adjacently ranked females opportunistically increased in Elo-rating, both before and after the depositions of the α families. Thus, these challenges to the established hierarchy can be predicted by increases in Elo-rating within the ß families after demographic changes to the α families. Our results suggest that the presence of natal males and the removal of top-ranking females should be minimized to maintain stable dominance relationships. In addition, longitudinal data reflecting dominance ranks, collected by using Elo-rating, may help managers of captive colonies in predicting dominance instabilities before they occur.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Macaca mulatta/fisiologia
Predomínio Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Agressão
Animais
Feminino
Abrigo para Animais
Masculino
Dinâmica Populacional
Estudos Retrospectivos
Comportamento Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171101
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171101
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170525
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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