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[PMID]:28461285
[Au] Autor:Rothenfluh F; Schulz PJ
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Communication and Health, Department of Communication Sciences, Università della Svizzera italiana, Lugano, Switzerland.
[Ti] Título:Physician Rating Websites: What Aspects Are Important to Identify a Good Doctor, and Are Patients Capable of Assessing Them? A Mixed-Methods Approach Including Physicians' and Health Care Consumers' Perspectives.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;19(5):e127, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Physician rating websites (PRWs) offer health care consumers the opportunity to evaluate their doctor anonymously. However, physicians' professional training and experience create a vast knowledge gap in medical matters between physicians and patients. This raises ethical concerns about the relevance and significance of health care consumers' evaluation of physicians' performance. OBJECTIVE: To identify the aspects physician rating websites should offer for evaluation, this study investigated the aspects of physicians and their practice relevant for identifying a good doctor, and whether health care consumers are capable of evaluating these aspects. METHODS: In a first step, a Delphi study with physicians from 4 specializations was conducted, testing various indicators to identify a good physician. These indicators were theoretically derived from Donabedian, who classifies quality in health care into pillars of structure, process, and outcome. In a second step, a cross-sectional survey with health care consumers in Switzerland (N=211) was launched based on the indicators developed in the Delphi study. Participants were asked to rate the importance of these indicators to identify a good physician and whether they would feel capable to evaluate those aspects after the first visit to a physician. All indicators were ordered into a 4×4 grid based on evaluation and importance, as judged by the physicians and health care consumers. Agreement between the physicians and health care consumers was calculated applying Holsti's method. RESULTS: In the majority of aspects, physicians and health care consumers agreed on what facets of care were important and not important to identify a good physician and whether patients were able to evaluate them, yielding a level of agreement of 74.3%. The two parties agreed that the infrastructure, staff, organization, and interpersonal skills are both important for a good physician and can be evaluated by health care consumers. Technical skills of a doctor and outcomes of care were also judged to be very important, but both parties agreed that they would not be evaluable by health care consumers. CONCLUSIONS: Health care consumers in Switzerland show a high appraisal of the importance of physician-approved criteria for assessing health care performance and a moderate self-perception of how capable they are of assessing the quality and performance of a physician. This study supports that health care consumers are differentiating between aspects they perceive they would be able to evaluate after a visit to a physician (such as attributes of structure and the interpersonal skills of a doctor), and others that lay beyond their ability to make an accurate judgment about (such as technical skills of a physician and outcome of care).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Informática Aplicada à Saúde dos Consumidores
Assistência à Saúde/normas
Internet
Satisfação do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos
Médicos/normas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Estudos Transversais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Autoimagem
Habilidades Sociais
Suíça
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.6875


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[PMID]:29342210
[Au] Autor:Liu MJ; Ma LY; Chou WJ; Chen YM; Liu TL; Hsiao RC; Hu HF; Yen CF
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Special Education, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
[Ti] Título:Effects of theory of mind performance training on reducing bullying involvement in children and adolescents with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191271, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Bullying involvement is prevalent among children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study examined the effects of theory of mind performance training (ToMPT) on reducing bullying involvement in children and adolescents with high-functioning ASD. Children and adolescents with high-functioning ASD completed ToMPT (n = 26) and social skills training (SST; n = 23) programs. Participants in both groups and their mothers rated the pretraining and posttraining bullying involvement of participants on the Chinese version of the School Bullying Experience Questionnaire. The paired t test was used to evaluate changes in bullying victimization and perpetration between the pretraining and posttraining assessments. Furthermore, the linear mixed-effect model was used to examine the difference in the training effect between the ToMPT and SST groups. The paired t test indicated that in the ToMPT group, the severities of both self-reported (p = .039) and mother-reported (p = .003) bullying victimization significantly decreased from the pretraining to posttraining assessments, whereas in the SST group, only self-reported bullying victimization significantly decreased (p = .027). The linear mixed-effect model indicated that compared with the SST program, the ToMPT program significantly reduced the severity of mother-reported bullying victimization (p = .041). The present study supports the effects of ToMPT on reducing mother-reported bullying victimization in children and adolescents with high-functioning ASD.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtorno do Espectro Autista/terapia
Bullying/prevenção & controle
Teoria da Mente
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Transtorno do Espectro Autista/psicologia
Criança
Vítimas de Crime/psicologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Modelos Lineares
Masculino
Modelos Psicológicos
Mães
Autorrelato
Habilidades Sociais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180221
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180221
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180118
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191271


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[PMID]:27776504
[Au] Autor:Marsh PJ; Polito V; Singh S; Coltheart M; Langdon R; Harris AW
[Ad] Endereço:ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD), Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia. dr.pamelajane@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:A quasi-randomized feasibility pilot study of specific treatments to improve emotion recognition and mental-state reasoning impairments in schizophrenia.
[So] Source:BMC Psychiatry;16(1):360, 2016 10 24.
[Is] ISSN:1471-244X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Impaired ability to make inferences about what another person might think or feel (i.e., social cognition impairment) is recognised as a core feature of schizophrenia and a key determinant of the poor social functioning that characterizes this illness. The development of treatments to target social cognitive impairments as a causal factor of impaired functioning in schizophrenia is of high priority. In this study, we investigated the acceptability, feasibility, and limited efficacy of 2 programs targeted at specific domains of social cognition in schizophrenia: "SoCog" Mental-State Reasoning Training (SoCog-MSRT) and "SoCog" Emotion Recognition Training (SoCog-ERT). METHOD: Thirty-one participants with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were allocated to either SoCog-MSRT (n = 19) or SoCog-ERT (n = 12). Treatment comprised 12 twice-weekly sessions for 6 weeks. Participants underwent assessments of social cognition, neurocognition and symptoms at baseline, post-training and 3-months after completing training. RESULTS: Attendance at training sessions was high with an average of 89.29 % attendance in the SoCog-MSRT groups and 85.42 % in the SoCog-ERT groups. Participants also reported the 2 programs as enjoyable and beneficial. Both SoCog-MSRT and SoCog-ERT groups showed increased scores on a false belief reasoning task and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test. The SoCog-MSRT group also showed reduced personalising attributional biases in a small number of participants, while the SoCog-ERT group showed improved emotion recognition. CONCLUSIONS: The results are promising and support the feasibility and acceptability of the 2 SoCog programs as well as limited efficacy to improve social cognitive abilities in schizophrenia. There is also some evidence that skills for the recognition of basic facial expressions need specific training. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000978763 . Retrospectively registered 3/09/2013.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtornos Cognitivos/terapia
Terapia Cognitiva/métodos
Esquizofrenia/terapia
Psicologia do Esquizofrênico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Austrália
Transtornos Cognitivos/psicologia
Emoções
Expressão Facial
Reconhecimento Facial
Estudos de Viabilidade
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Nova Zelândia
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados não Aleatórios como Assunto
Projetos Piloto
Ajustamento Social
Comportamento Social
Percepção Social
Habilidades Sociais
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CLINICAL TRIAL; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180118
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180118
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29236411
[Au] Autor:Wallace A; Palmer J
[Ad] Endereço:National Conference of State Legislatures.
[Ti] Título:Boosting Social and Emotional Development In and Out of School.
[So] Source:NCSL Legisbrief;25(41):1-2, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1068-2716
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:(1) Illinois' state ESSA plan reflects the state's whole-child approach, adding references to the social, emotional and behavioral needs of students, along with high expectations for student achievement. (2) Massachusetts' state ESSA plan lists supporting socialemotional learning, health and safety as among the state's core educational strategies. (3) South Carolina's ESSA plan develops a framework identifying self-direction, perseverance, global perspective and interpersonal skills to be among the characteristics that every student should have when he or she graduates from high school.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Desenvolvimento Infantil
Educação/legislação & jurisprudência
Ajustamento Emocional
Habilidades Sociais
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Criança
Comportamento Infantil
Pré-Escolar
Currículo
Seres Humanos
Aprendizagem
Instituições Acadêmicas
Governo Estadual
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180105
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180105
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:T
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28464985
[Au] Autor:Smink DS
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Electronic address: dsmink@partners.org.
[Ti] Título:Why training in nontechnical skills is essential.
[So] Source:Surgery;162(1):182, 2017 07.
[Is] ISSN:1532-7361
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cirurgia Geral/educação
Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente/organização & administração
Treinamento por Simulação/organização & administração
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adaptação Psicológica
Avaliação Educacional
Seres Humanos
Salas Cirúrgicas/organização & administração
Estudos Prospectivos
Habilidades Sociais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:EDITORIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28953946
[Au] Autor:Canela C; Buadze A; Dube A; Eich D; Liebrenz M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
[Ti] Título:Skills and compensation strategies in adult ADHD - A qualitative study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(9):e0184964, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: The primary objectives of this study were to investigate how adult patients with ADHD coped with their symptoms prior to diagnosis and treatment, what skills and compensation strategies they had developed and what their self-perceptions of these strategies were. METHODS: We used a qualitative approach to analyze interviews with 32 outpatients of a specialty care unit at a university hospital. RESULTS: Patients reported frequent use of diverse compensatory strategies with varying degrees of effectiveness. These were classified into five categories (organizational, motoric, attentional, social, psychopharmacological). In certain circumstances, ADHD symptoms were even perceived as useful. CONCLUSION: Before diagnosis and treatment, patients with ADHD may develop a variety of skills to cope with their symptoms. Several of these skills are perceived as helpful. Knowledge of self-generated coping strategies may help better understand patients and their histories and thus facilitate patient cooperation. Moreover, knowing ways in which such patients cope with their symptoms may help elucidate reasons for late or under-diagnosing of the disorder.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Adaptação Psicológica
Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Atenção
Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/diagnóstico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Entrevistas como Assunto
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Habilidades Sociais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171024
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171024
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170928
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0184964


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[PMID]:28796781
[Au] Autor:Tanaka H; Negoro H; Iwasaka H; Nakamura S
[Ad] Endereço:Graduate School of Information Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma-shi, Nara, 630-0101, Japan.
[Ti] Título:Embodied conversational agents for multimodal automated social skills training in people with autism spectrum disorders.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(8):e0182151, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Social skills training, performed by human trainers, is a well-established method for obtaining appropriate skills in social interaction. Previous work automated the process of social skills training by developing a dialogue system that teaches social communication skills through interaction with a computer avatar. Even though previous work that simulated social skills training only considered acoustic and linguistic information, human social skills trainers take into account visual and other non-verbal features. In this paper, we create and evaluate a social skills training system that closes this gap by considering the audiovisual features of the smiling ratio and the head pose (yaw and pitch). In addition, the previous system was only tested with graduate students; in this paper, we applied our system to children or young adults with autism spectrum disorders. For our experimental evaluation, we recruited 18 members from the general population and 10 people with autism spectrum disorders and gave them our proposed multimodal system to use. An experienced human social skills trainer rated the social skills of the users. We evaluated the system's effectiveness by comparing pre- and post-training scores and identified significant improvement in their social skills using our proposed multimodal system. Computer-based social skills training is useful for people who experience social difficulties. Such a system can be used by teachers, therapists, and social skills trainers for rehabilitation and the supplemental use of human-based training anywhere and anytime.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtorno do Espectro Autista/reabilitação
Terapia Comportamental/métodos
Comunicação
Relações Interpessoais
Habilidades Sociais
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Transtorno do Espectro Autista/psicologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171009
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171009
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170811
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0182151


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[PMID]:28787504
[Au] Autor:Bieleninik L; Geretsegger M; Mössler K; Assmus J; Thompson G; Gattino G; Elefant C; Gottfried T; Igliozzi R; Muratori F; Suvini F; Kim J; Crawford MJ; Odell-Miller H; Oldfield A; Casey Ó; Finnemann J; Carpente J; Park AL; Grossi E; Gold C; TIME-A Study Team
[Ad] Endereço:GAMUT-The Grieg Academy Music Therapy Research Centre, Uni Research Health, Uni Research, Bergen, Norway.
[Ti] Título:Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy vs Enhanced Standard Care on Symptom Severity Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: The TIME-A Randomized Clinical Trial.
[So] Source:JAMA;318(6):525-535, 2017 08 08.
[Is] ISSN:1538-3598
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Importance: Music therapy may facilitate skills in areas affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD), such as social interaction and communication. Objective: To evaluate effects of improvisational music therapy on generalized social communication skills of children with ASD. Design, Setting, and Participants: Assessor-blinded, randomized clinical trial, conducted in 9 countries and enrolling children aged 4 to 7 years with ASD. Children were recruited from November 2011 to November 2015, with follow-up between January 2012 and November 2016. Interventions: Enhanced standard care (n = 182) vs enhanced standard care plus improvisational music therapy (n = 182), allocated in a 1:1 ratio. Enhanced standard care consisted of usual care as locally available plus parent counseling to discuss parents' concerns and provide information about ASD. In improvisational music therapy, trained music therapists sang or played music with each child, attuned and adapted to the child's focus of attention, to help children develop affect sharing and joint attention. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was symptom severity over 5 months, based on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), social affect domain (range, 0-27; higher scores indicate greater severity; minimal clinically important difference, 1). Prespecified secondary outcomes included parent-rated social responsiveness. All outcomes were also assessed at 2 and 12 months. Results: Among 364 participants randomized (mean age, 5.4 years; 83% boys), 314 (86%) completed the primary end point and 290 (80%) completed the last end point. Over 5 months, participants assigned to music therapy received a median of 19 music therapy, 3 parent counseling, and 36 other therapy sessions, compared with 3 parent counseling and 45 other therapy sessions for those assigned to enhanced standard care. From baseline to 5 months, mean ADOS social affect scores estimated by linear mixed-effects models decreased from 14.08 to 13.23 in the music therapy group and from 13.49 to 12.58 in the standard care group (mean difference, 0.06 [95% CI, -0.70 to 0.81]; P = .88), with no significant difference in improvement. Of 20 exploratory secondary outcomes, 17 showed no significant difference. Conclusions and Relevance: Among children with autism spectrum disorder, improvisational music therapy, compared with enhanced standard care, resulted in no significant difference in symptom severity based on the ADOS social affect domain over 5 months. These findings do not support the use of improvisational music therapy for symptom reduction in children with autism spectrum disorder. Trial Registration: isrctn.org Identifier: ISRCTN78923965.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtorno do Espectro Autista/terapia
Musicoterapia
Habilidades Sociais
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Atenção
Transtorno do Espectro Autista/psicologia
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Método Simples-Cego
Resultado do Tratamento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170912
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170912
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170809
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jama.2017.9478


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[PMID]:28786484
[Au] Autor:Cunningham BJ; Hanna SE; Oddson B; Thomas-Stonell N; Rosenbaum P
[Ad] Endereço:School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
[Ti] Título:A population-based study of communicative participation in preschool children with speech-language impairments.
[So] Source:Dev Med Child Neurol;59(10):1049-1055, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1469-8749
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:AIM: To develop statistical models of communicative participation development of preschool children and explore variations by level of function. METHOD: This was a secondary analysis of data from a longitudinal study of preschool children with speech and language impairments (n=46 872; age range 18-67mo, mean age [SD] 41.76mo [11.92]; 67% male) accessing publicly funded services in Ontario, Canada. Two measures were used: Focus on the Outcomes of Communication Under Six (FOCUS), measuring changes in communicative participation skills, and the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS), classifying communicative function into one of five levels. We used mixed effects modeling to fit growth curves for children in each CFCS level. Models allowed for variation in initial FOCUS score at 18 months, rate of growth with age, and rate of acceleration/deceleration with age. RESULTS: Starting FOCUS score (18mo) varied inversely with CFCS level at entry to the program. Growth was initially rapid and then leveled off for children in Levels I to III. Growth was less rapid for children in Level IV, but leveled off, and was slow but continual for children in Level V. INTERPRETATION: This work can help us to move beyond traditional impairment-based thinking and shows that children can make meaningful communicative changes regardless of their function.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comunicação
Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem
Distúrbios da Fala
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Desenvolvimento Infantil
Pré-Escolar
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Testes de Linguagem
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Ontário
Estudos Prospectivos
Habilidades Sociais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170929
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170929
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170809
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/dmcn.13515


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[PMID]:28758189
[Au] Autor:Miyahara M; Hillier SL; Pridham L; Nakagawa S
[Ad] Endereço:School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand, 9054.
[Ti] Título:Task-oriented interventions for children with developmental co-ordination disorder.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;7:CD010914, 2017 07 31.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD) is a common childhood disorder, which can persist into adolescence and adulthood. Children with DCD have difficulties in performing the essential motor tasks required for self-care, academic, social and recreational activities. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of task-oriented interventions on movement performance, psychosocial functions, activity, and participation for children with DCD and to examine differential intervention effects as a factor of age, sex, severity of DCD, intervention intensity, and type of intervention. SEARCH METHODS: In March 2017, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, 13 other databases, and five trials registers. We also searched reference lists, and contacted members of the mailing list of the International Conference on DCD to identify additional studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that compared the task-oriented intervention with either an inactive control intervention or an active control intervention in children and adolescents aged four to 18 years with a diagnosis of DCD.Types of outcome measures included changes in motor function, as assessed by standardised performance outcome tests and questionnaires; adverse events; and measures of participation. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: All review authors participated in study selection, data extraction, and assessments of risk of bias and quality, and two review authors independently performed all tasks. Specifically, two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts to eliminate irrelevant studies, extracted data from the included studies, assessed risk of bias, and rated the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. In cases of ambiguity or information missing from the paper, one review author contacted trial authors. MAIN RESULTS: This review included 15 studies (eight RCTs and seven quasi-RCTs). Study characteristicsThe trials included 649 participants of both sexes, ranging in age from five to 12 years.The participants were from Australia, Canada, China, Sweden, Taiwan, and the UK.Trials were conducted in hospital settings; at a university-based clinic, laboratory, or centre; in community centres; at home or school, or both at home and school.The durations of task-oriented interventions were mostly short term (less than six months), with the total number of sessions ranging from five to 50. The length of each session ranged from 30 to 90 minutes, and the frequencies ranged from once to seven times per week.We judged the risk of bias as moderate to high across the studies. Some elements were impossible to achieve (such as blinding of administering personnel or participants). KEY RESULTS: primary outcomesA meta-analysis of two RCTs and four quasi-RCTs found in favour of task-oriented interventions for improved motor performance compared to no intervention (mean difference (MD) -3.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) -5.88 to -1.39; P = 0.002; I = 43%; 6 trials, 169 children; very low-quality evidence).A meta-analysis of two RCTs found no effect of task-oriented interventions for improved motor performance compared to no intervention (MD -2.34, 95% CI -7.50 to 2.83; P = 0.38; I = 42%; 2 trials, 51 children; low-quality evidence).Two studies reported no adverse effects or events. Through personal correspondence, the authors of nine studies indicated that no injuries had occurred. KEY RESULTS: secondary outcomesDue to the limited number of studies with complete and consistent data, we were unable to perform any meta-analyses on our secondary measures or any subgroup analysis on age, sex, severity of DCD, and intervention intensity. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We have very little confidence in the effect estimate: the true effect is likely to be substantially different from the estimate of effect. The conclusions drawn from previous reviews, which unanimously reported beneficial effects of intervention, are inconsistent with our conclusions. This review highlights the need for carefully designed and executed RCTs to investigate the effect of interventions for children with DCD.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtornos das Habilidades Motoras/terapia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Atividades Cotidianas
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Transtornos dos Movimentos/terapia
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados não Aleatórios como Assunto/estatística & dados numéricos
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto/estatística & dados numéricos
Habilidades Sociais
Análise e Desempenho de Tarefas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170911
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170911
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170801
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD010914.pub2



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