Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : F01.145.875.864 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 1456 [refinar]
Mostrando: 1 .. 10   no formato [Detalhado]

página 1 de 146 ir para página                         

  1 / 1456 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29174059
[Au] Autor:Joel AC; Habedank A; Mey J
[Ad] Endereço:Institut für Biologie II (Zoologie), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 3, D-52074 Aachen, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Vibratory movements in contests between females of the feather-legged spider (Uloborus plumipes).
[So] Source:Zoology (Jena);125:87-93, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2720
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Females of the feather-legged spider Uloborus plumipes invade, and compete for, each other's orb webs. In the context of these competitive interactions the question arose how the spiders communicate. Since substrate-borne vibrations are the most important component of the sensory environment of web-building spiders, we investigated vibratory movements that might serve as signals of communication. Three behaviors were found to be associated with female-female contests and to cause propagating vibrations in the spider webs: thread pulling, abdominal trembling, and web shaking. While thread pulling and abdominal trembling were also observed when prey insects were caught in the webs, web shaking occurred only in response to the presence of a competing conspecific. Caused by flexing of the first legs and a vigorous rotary movement of the opisthosoma, web shaking creates a short burst of strong oscillations of the orb web. This behavior always elicited a behavioral reaction by the competitor and may serve as an intraspecific signal in the mutual assessment of competing spiders. We suggest that web shaking communicates resource holding potential in U. plumipes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Comportamento Competitivo/fisiologia
Aranhas/fisiologia
Territorialidade
Vibração
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180111
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180111
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 1456 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29261704
[Au] Autor:Vergara-Asenjo G; Mateo-Vega J; Alvarado A; Potvin C
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
[Ti] Título:A participatory approach to elucidate the consequences of land invasions on REDD+ initiatives: A case study with Indigenous communities in Panama.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189463, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Land tenure and tenure security are among the most important factors determining the viability and success of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) initiatives. The premise of the present paper is that territorial conflicts lead to forest loss and compromise the successful implementation of REDD+. Within this context, the main objectives of this paper are to (i) document, relying on participatory methods, the extent to which land conflicts drive deforestation and (ii) reflect on the legal context of REDD+ examining if, from an Indigenous perspective, it offers tools to resolve such conflicts. We used the Upper Bayano Watershed in eastern Panama as a case study of complex land tenure dynamics, and their effects on forest conservation in the context of REDD+. Combining a range of participatory methods including participatory mapping and forest carbon stock assessment, we estimated the consequences of land invasions on forest carbon stocks. Our analysis shows that invasions of Indigenous territories amounted to 27.6% of the total deforestation for the period of 2001-2014. The situation is of paramount concern in the Embera territory of Majé where 95.4% of total deforestation was caused by colonist invaders. Using and validating the maps made freely available by the Global Forest Change initiative of the University of Maryland, we then developed a reference level for the watershed and carried out a back of the envelop estimation of likely REDD+ revenue, showing its potential to bring much needed income to Indigenous communities striving to protect their forest estate. Our analysis of current legislation in Panama highlights confusion and important legal voids and emphasizes the strong links between land tenure, carbon ownership, and territorial invasions. The options and shortcoming of implementing REDD+ in Indigenous territories is discussed in the conclusion taking our legal review into account.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Florestas
Grupos Populacionais
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Poluição do Ar/análise
Dióxido de Carbono/análise
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais/legislação & jurisprudência
Geografia
Seres Humanos
Legislação como Assunto
Panamá
Territorialidade
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
142M471B3J (Carbon Dioxide)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180108
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180108
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189463


  3 / 1456 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29023545
[Au] Autor:Mumm CAS; Knörnschild M
[Ad] Endereço:Animal Behavior Lab, Institute for Biology, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Territorial choruses of giant otter groups (Pteronura brasiliensis) encode information on group identity.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0185733, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Group living animals often engage in corporate territorial defence. Territorial group vocalizations can provide information about group identity, size and composition. Neighbouring groups may use this information to avoid unfavourable direct conflicts. Giant otters are highly social and territorial animals with an elaborate vocal repertoire. They produce long-range screams when they are alert or excited, i.e. in an alarm, isolation or begging context. Long-range screams are not only produced by one individual at a time ('single screams') but also by multiple group members simultaneously, resulting in a highly conspicuous 'group chorus'. Wild giant otters regularly produce group choruses during interactions with predators, when they detect intruders in their territory or before group reunions after separation. Since single screams and especially group choruses probably contribute to the groups' corporate territorial defence, we hypothesized that group identity is encoded in single screams and group choruses. We analysed vocalizations from five wild and three captive giant otter groups and found statistical evidence for a group signature in group choruses. Results for single screams were less conclusive, which might have been caused by the comparatively lower sample size. We suggest that giant otters may gain information on group identity by listening to group choruses. Group identity likely constitutes important social information for giant otters since territory boundaries of neighbouring groups can overlap and direct inter-group conflicts are severe. Therefore, group chorusing may contribute to the mutual avoidance of members from different groups.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Lontras/fisiologia
Comportamento Social
Territorialidade
Vocalização Animal/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171022
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171022
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171013
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0185733


  4 / 1456 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28877259
[Au] Autor:Fatsini E; Rey S; Ibarra-Zatarain Z; Mackenzie S; Duncan NJ
[Ad] Endereço:IRTA, Sant Carles de la Ràpita, Tarragona, Spain.
[Ti] Título:Dominance behaviour in a non-aggressive flatfish, Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) and brain mRNA abundance of selected transcripts.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(9):e0184283, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Dominance is defined as the preferential access to limited resources. The present study aimed to characterise dominance in a non-aggressive flatfish species, the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) by 1) identifying dominance categories and associated behaviours and 2) linking dominance categories (dominant and subordinate) with the abundance of selected mRNA transcripts in the brain. Early juveniles (n = 74, 37 pairs) were subjected to a dyadic dominance test, related to feeding, and once behavioural phenotypes had been described the abundance of ten selected mRNAs related to dominance and aggressiveness was measured in the brain. Late juveniles were subjected to two dyadic dominance tests (n = 34, 17 pairs), related to feeding and territoriality and one group test (n = 24, 4 groups of 6 fish). Sole feeding first were categorized as dominant and sole feeding second or not feeding as subordinate. Three social behaviours (i. "Resting the head" on another fish, ii. "Approaching" another fish, iii. "Swimming above another" fish) were associated with dominance of feeding. Two other variables (i. Total time occupying the preferred area during the last 2 hours of the 24 h test, ii. Organisms occupying the preferred area when the test ended) were representative of dominance in the place preference test. In all tests, dominant fish compared to subordinate fish displayed a significantly higher number of the behaviours "Rest the head" and "Approaches". Moreover, dominant sole dominated the sand at the end of the test, and in the group test dominated the area close to the feed delivery point before feed was delivered. The mRNA abundance of the selected mRNAs related to neurogenesis (nrd2) and neuroplasticity (c-fos) in dominant sole compared to subordinate were significantly different. This is the first study to characterise dominance categories with associated behaviours and mRNA abundance in Senegalese sole and provides tools to study dominance related problems in feeding and reproduction in aquaculture.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal
Encéfalo/metabolismo
Linguados/fisiologia
Regulação da Expressão Gênica
Predomínio Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Agressão
Animais
Comportamento Alimentar
Perfilação da Expressão Gênica
Neurogênese
Plasticidade Neuronal
Análise de Componente Principal
RNA Mensageiro/metabolismo
Natação
Territorialidade
Gravação em Vídeo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (RNA, Messenger)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171023
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171023
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170907
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0184283


  5 / 1456 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28594925
[Au] Autor:Bueno A; Carvalho FB; Gutierres JM; Lhamas C; Andrade CM
[Ad] Endereço:Programa de Pós Graduação em Medicina Veterinária, Hospital Veterinário, Centro de Ciências Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria/RS, Brazil.
[Ti] Título:A comparative study of the effect of the dose and exposure duration of anabolic androgenic steroids on behavior, cholinergic regulation, and oxidative stress in rats.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(6):e0177623, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The aim of this study was to assess if the dose and exposure duration of the anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) boldenone (BOL) and stanazolol (ST) affected memory, anxiety, and social interaction, as well as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex (CC) and hippocampus (HC). Male Wistar rats (90 animals) were randomly assigned to three treatment protocols: (I) 5 mg/kg BOL or ST, once a week for 4 weeks; (II) 2.5 mg/kg BOL or ST, once a week for 8 weeks; and (III) 1.25 mg/kg BOL or ST, once a week for 12 weeks. Each treatment protocol included a control group that received an olive oil injection (vehicle control) and AAS were administered intramuscularly (a total volume of 0.2 ml) once a week in all three treatment protocols. In the BOL and ST groups, a higher anxiety level was observed only for Protocol I. BOL and ST significantly affected social interaction in all protocols. Memory deficits and increased AChE activity in the CC and HC were found in the BOL groups treated according to Protocol III only. In addition, BOL and ST significantly increased oxidative stress in both the CC and HC in the groups treated according to Protocol I and III. In conclusion, our findings show that the impact of BOL and ST on memory, anxiety, and social interaction depends on the dose and exposure duration of these AAS.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Acetilcolinesterase/metabolismo
Anabolizantes/farmacologia
Androgênios/farmacologia
Comportamento Animal/efeitos dos fármacos
Estresse Oxidativo/efeitos dos fármacos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Agressão/efeitos dos fármacos
Anabolizantes/administração & dosagem
Androgênios/administração & dosagem
Animais
Relação Dose-Resposta a Droga
Hipocampo/efeitos dos fármacos
Hipocampo/patologia
Masculino
Ratos Wistar
Estanozolol/administração & dosagem
Estanozolol/farmacologia
Territorialidade
Testosterona/administração & dosagem
Testosterona/análogos & derivados
Testosterona/farmacologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Anabolic Agents); 0 (Androgens); 3XMK78S47O (Testosterone); 4R1VB9P8V3 (Stanozolol); 5H7I2IP58X (boldenone); EC 3.1.1.7 (Acetylcholinesterase)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170918
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170918
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170609
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0177623


  6 / 1456 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28532466
[Au] Autor:Apfelbeck B; Helm B; Illera JC; Mortega KG; Smiddy P; Evans NP
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, G12 8QQ, UK. bea.apfelbeck@gmx.de.
[Ti] Título:Baseline and stress-induced levels of corticosterone in male and female Afrotropical and European temperate stonechats during breeding.
[So] Source:BMC Evol Biol;17(1):114, 2017 May 22.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2148
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Latitudinal variation in avian life histories falls along a slow-fast pace of life continuum: tropical species produce small clutches, but have a high survival probability, while in temperate species the opposite pattern is found. This study investigated whether differential investment into reproduction and survival of tropical and temperate species is paralleled by differences in the secretion of the vertebrate hormone corticosterone (CORT). Depending on circulating concentrations, CORT can both act as a metabolic (low to medium levels) and a stress hormone (high levels) and, thereby, influence reproductive decisions. Baseline and stress-induced CORT was measured across sequential stages of the breeding season in males and females of closely related taxa of stonechats (Saxicola spp) from a wide distribution area. We compared stonechats from 13 sites, representing Canary Islands, European temperate and East African tropical areas. Stonechats are highly seasonal breeders at all these sites, but vary between tropical and temperate regions with regard to reproductive investment and presumably also survival. RESULTS: In accordance with life-history theory, during parental stages, post-capture (baseline) CORT was overall lower in tropical than in temperate stonechats. However, during mating stages, tropical males had elevated post-capture (baseline) CORT concentrations, which did not differ from those of temperate males. Female and male mates of a pair showed correlated levels of post-capture CORT when sampled after simulated territorial intrusions. In contrast to the hypothesis that species with low reproduction and high annual survival should be more risk-sensitive, tropical stonechats had lower stress-induced CORT concentrations than temperate stonechats. We also found relatively high post-capture (baseline) and stress-induced CORT concentrations, in slow-paced Canary Islands stonechats. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support and refine the view that baseline CORT facilitates energetically demanding activities in males and females and reflects investment into reproduction. Low parental workload was associated with lower post-capture (baseline) CORT as expected for a slow pace of life in tropical species. On a finer resolution, however, this tropical-temperate contrast did not generally hold. Post-capture (baseline) CORT was higher during mating stages in particular in tropical males, possibly to support the energetic needs of mate-guarding. Counter to predictions based on life history theory, our data do not confirm the hypothesis that long-lived tropical populations have higher stress-induced CORT concentrations than short-lived temperate populations. Instead, in the predator-rich tropical environments of African stonechats, a dampened stress response during parental stages may increase survival probabilities of young. Overall our data further support an association between life history and baseline CORT, but challenge the role of stress-induced CORT as a mediator of tropical-temperate variation in life history.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aves Canoras/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Índice de Massa Corporal
Corticosterona/sangue
Europa (Continente)
Feminino
Estágios do Ciclo de Vida
Masculino
Reprodução
Aves Canoras/sangue
Aves Canoras/classificação
Aves Canoras/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Espanha
Estresse Fisiológico
Territorialidade
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
W980KJ009P (Corticosterone)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170817
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170817
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170524
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12862-017-0960-9


  7 / 1456 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28412929
[Au] Autor:Apfelbeck B; Mortega KG; Flinks H; Illera JC; Helm B
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, G12 8QQ, UK. bea.apfelbeck@gmx.de.
[Ti] Título:Testosterone, territorial response, and song in seasonally breeding tropical and temperate stonechats.
[So] Source:BMC Evol Biol;17(1):101, 2017 Apr 17.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2148
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Testosterone facilitates physiological, morphological, and behavioral changes required for breeding in male vertebrates. However, testosterone concentrations and the link between its seasonal changes and those in reproductive behaviors vary greatly among species. To better understand the impact of tropical and temperate environments and life history factors on this variation, we have compared testosterone, territorial behavior and song performance across sequential stages of the breeding season in males of 16 closely related taxa of East African tropical and West European temperate stonechats (Saxicola spp), which all breed during a short breeding season, but differ in migratory behavior, seasonal territory-acquisition and pace of life. RESULTS: We found that generally, the profiles of testosterone and territorial behavior were similar across latitudes. African stonechats with a slow pace of life had equally high peak testosterone concentrations and responded as aggressively to an intruder as European stonechats with a fast pace of life. However, song performance at the beginning of the breeding season was lower in African than in European stonechats. The differences in song performance were not associated with variation in testosterone levels between tropical and temperate stonechats. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest a very similar role for testosterone as a mediator of high intensity territorial aggression during the fertile period of females in tropical and temperate stonechats, which all are highly seasonal, locally synchronous breeders. A potential explanation may be high risk of extra-pair copulations which has been associated with synchronous breeding. Interestingly, an association was not consistent for song performance. Our data suggest that song performance can be disassociated from peak testosterone levels depending on its role in breeding behavior. Despite similar testosterone levels, European males, which early in the breeding season acquire territories and mates, showed greater song performance than African stonechats, which maintain year-round territories and pair-bonds. Taken together, our study comparing related taxa of old world songbirds suggests that short breeding seasons may be a major selective force for high peak testosterone levels during breeding regardless of latitude and pace of life, but that particular behaviors, in our case song, can be uncoupled from peak testosterone levels.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aves Canoras/fisiologia
Testosterona/sangue
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: África Oriental
Agressão
Animais
Cruzamento
Europa (Continente)
Feminino
Masculino
Ligação do Par
Estações do Ano
Aves Canoras/sangue
Aves Canoras/classificação
Territorialidade
Vocalização Animal
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
3XMK78S47O (Testosterone)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170509
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170509
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170418
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12862-017-0944-9


  8 / 1456 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28394910
[Au] Autor:Reiley BM; Benson TJ; Everitts J; Bednarz JC
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biological Sciences, Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, Arkansas, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Does flooding effect the apparent survival and body condition of a ground foraging migrant passerine?
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(4):e0175179, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Natural disturbances play a fundamental role in maintaining habitat and landscape heterogeneity; however, these events can also have negative effects on some species. While we know that disturbances can reduce habitat quality for many species, leading to diminished populations and altered community structure, the effect of these events on individuals that continue to occupy affected areas remains unknown. We focused on understanding the impact of flood-mediated reduction of habitat quality on Swainson's Warblers (Limnothlypis swainsonii). In 2008, a catastrophic flood event occurred on the Mississippi River and its tributaries, severely affecting one of two locations where we had studied territorial males since 2004. To determine the impact of flooding on this species, we evaluated how body condition and apparent survival of males differed between locations and in pre-flood (2004-2007) and post-flood (2008-2010) periods. Body condition did not differ between locations after the flood, suggesting that flooding did not cause food limitation for this obligate ground forager. Apparent survival in the post-flood period was lower at both locations and led to near population extirpation at the heavily flood-impacted site. Overall, this study demonstrates the vulnerability of species to extreme hydrological events, an increasing threat due to climate change. Future research should focus on identifying species that are vulnerable to these events and determining appropriate conservation strategies. Conservation for the Swainson's Warbler should focus on identifying and conserving the highest elevation, least flood prone areas within bottomland hardwood forests and managing those areas for thick understory vegetation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Apetitivo
Inundações
Aves Canoras/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Tamanho Corporal
Peso Corporal
Florestas
Modelos Lineares
Masculino
Análise de Componente Principal
Rios
Análise de Sobrevida
Territorialidade
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170830
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170830
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170411
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0175179


  9 / 1456 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28234926
[Au] Autor:Grainger Hunt W; David Wiens J; Law PR; Fuller MR; Hunt TL; Driscoll DE; Jackman RE
[Ad] Endereço:The Peregrine Fund, Boise, Idaho, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Quantifying the demographic cost of human-related mortality to a raptor population.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(2):e0172232, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Raptors are exposed to a wide variety of human-related mortality agents, and yet population-level effects are rarely quantified. Doing so requires modeling vital rates in the context of species life-history, behavior, and population dynamics theory. In this paper, we explore the details of such an analysis by focusing on the demography of a resident, tree-nesting population of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the vicinity of an extensive (142 km2) windfarm in California. During 1994-2000, we tracked the fates of >250 radio-marked individuals of four life-stages and conducted five annual surveys of territory occupancy and reproduction. Collisions with wind turbines accounted for 41% of 88 uncensored fatalities, most of which were subadults and nonbreeding adults (floaters). A consistent overall male preponderance in the population meant that females were the limiting sex in this territorial, monogamous species. Estimates of potential population growth rate and associated variance indicated a stable breeding population, but one for which any further decrease in vital rates would require immigrant floaters to fill territory vacancies. Occupancy surveys 5 and 13 years later (2005 and 2013) showed that the nesting population remained intact, and no upward trend was apparent in the proportion of subadult eagles as pair members, a condition that would have suggested a deficit of adult replacements. However, the number of golden eagle pairs required to support windfarm mortality was large. We estimated that the entire annual reproductive output of 216-255 breeding pairs would have been necessary to support published estimates of 55-65 turbine blade-strike fatalities per year. Although the vital rates forming the basis for these calculations may have changed since the data were collected, our approach should be useful for gaining a clearer understanding of how anthropogenic mortality affects the health of raptor populations, particularly those species with delayed maturity and naturally low reproductive rates.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Dinâmica Populacional
Aves Predatórias
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Algoritmos
Animais
California
Feminino
Fertilidade
Geografia
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Modelos Estatísticos
Crescimento Demográfico
Estações do Ano
Territorialidade
Fatores de Tempo
Vento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170907
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170907
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170225
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0172232


  10 / 1456 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28167134
[Au] Autor:Ramallo MR; Morandini L; Birba A; Somoza GM; Pandolfi M
[Ad] Endereço:Laboratorio de Neuroendocrinología y Comportamiento, DBBE, IBBEA-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, CABA, Argentina.
[Ti] Título:From molecule to behavior: Brain aromatase (cyp19a1b) characterization, expression analysis and its relation with social status and male agonistic behavior in a Neotropical cichlid fish.
[So] Source:Horm Behav;89:176-188, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1095-6867
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The enzyme aromatase, responsible for the conversion of C19 androgens to C18 estrogens, exists as two paralogue copies in teleost fish: Cyp19a1a mostly expressed in the gonads, referred as gonadal aromatase, and Cyp19a1b, mostly expressed in the brain, accordingly known as brain aromatase. The neural localization of Cyp19a1b is greatly contained within the social behavior network and mesolimbic reward system in fish, suggesting a strong role of estrogen synthesis in the regulation of social behavior. In this work we aimed to analyze the variation in cyp19a1b expression in brain and pituitary of males of a highly social cichlid, Cichlasoma dimerus (locally known as chanchita), and its relation with inter-individual variability in agonistic behavior in a communal social environment. We first characterized chanchita's cyp19a1b mRNA and deduced amino acid sequence, which showed a high degree of conservation when compared to other teleost brain aromatase sequences, and its tissue expression patterns. Within the brain, Cyp19a1b was solely detected at putative radial glial cells of the forebrain, close to the brain ventricles. We then studied the relative expression levels of cyp19a1b by Real Time PCR in the brain and pituitary of males of different social status, territorial vs. non-territorial, and its relationship with an index of agonistic behavior. We found that even though, brain aromatase expression did not differ between types of males, pituitary cyp19a1b expression levels positively correlated with the index of agonistic behavior. This suggests a novel role of the pituitary in the regulation of social behavior by local estrogen synthesis.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Agonístico/fisiologia
Aromatase/genética
Encéfalo/fisiologia
Ciclídeos/genética
Dominação-Subordinação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Androgênios/fisiologia
Animais
Expressão Gênica
Masculino
RNA Mensageiro/genética
Meio Social
Territorialidade
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Androgens); 0 (RNA, Messenger); EC 1.14.14.1 (Aromatase)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170925
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170925
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170208
[St] Status:MEDLINE



página 1 de 146 ir para página                         
   


Refinar a pesquisa
  Base de dados : MEDLINE Formulário avançado   

    Pesquisar no campo  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/OPAS/OMS - Centro Latino-Americano e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde