Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : F01.829.263.370.330 [Categoria DeCS]
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[PMID]:29208229
[Au] Autor:Steiger S; Stökl J
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Insect Biotechnology, University of Gießen, 35392 Gießen, Germany. Electronic address: sandra.steiger@agrar.uni-giessen.de.
[Ti] Título:Pheromones involved in insect parental care and family life.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Insect Sci;24:89-95, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2214-5753
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Effective parental care requires recognition and communication processes. Whereas chemical communication has been studied intensively in eusocial organisms, in which the workers (siblings) predominantly provide brood care, insect groups in which parents engage in care have been largely neglected. However, the study of communication in insect families might complement and enhance our understanding not only of the evolution of signaling process involved in social insects, but also of those involved in vertebrate families. In this review, we synthesize the existing information about the pheromones and chemical cues that regulate and affect insect parental care and family life. We will present research dealing with pre-hatching as well as post-hatching parental care and cover interactions between parents and offspring, between male and female parents, and among siblings.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comunicação Animal
Sinais (Psicologia)
Insetos/fisiologia
Feromônios/metabolismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Materno
Comportamento Paterno
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Pheromones)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180119
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180119
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171207
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 1578 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28505162
[Au] Autor:Li P; Becker JB; Heitzeg MM; McClellan ML; Reed BG; Zucker RA
[Ad] Endereço:School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Gender differences in the transmission of risk for antisocial behavior problems across generations.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(5):e0177288, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Previous studies have shown that children of alcohol use disorder (AUD) parents are more likely to develop alcohol problems as well as antisocial and other behavior problems. The purpose of this study was to examine gender discordance in the effect of early maternal and paternal influences on antisocial behaviors of boys and girls, as well as the environmental factors that moderate the parental effects. Specifically, we examined the effects of childhood and adulthood antisocial behavior of the parents on offspring antisocial behavior as young adults. We also examined whether mothers' and fathers' drinking problems when offspring were young children (6-8 years) affected offspring antisocial behavior as young adults (18-21 years). We evaluated 655 children from 339 families in the Michigan Longitudinal Study (MLS), a prospective study of AUD and non-AUD families. Path models were constructed in order to test for the parental contributions to offspring outcomes. We found that both mothers' and fathers' antisocial behavior contributed to the children's young adult antisocial behavior. Only mothers' drinking problems while their children were little had a significant effect on their sons' later drinking, but not on their daughters'. These different parental effects suggest that maternal and paternal influences may be mediated by different mechanisms.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtorno da Personalidade Antissocial/epidemiologia
Transtorno da Personalidade Antissocial/etiologia
Comportamento Materno
Comportamento Paterno
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool/epidemiologia
Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool/etiologia
Criança
Transtornos do Comportamento Infantil/epidemiologia
Transtornos do Comportamento Infantil/etiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Modelos Teóricos
Fatores de Risco
Apoio Social
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170920
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170920
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170516
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0177288


  3 / 1578 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28500085
[Au] Autor:Fullston T; McPherson NO; Zander-Fox D; Lane M
[Ad] Endereço:Discipline of Obstetrics & GynaecologyAdelaide Medical School, Robinson Research Institute, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia tod.fullston@adelaide.edu.au.
[Ti] Título:The most common vices of men can damage fertility and the health of the next generation.
[So] Source:J Endocrinol;234(2):F1-F6, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1479-6805
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Animal and human studies demonstrate that acquired paternal traits can impair both a male's fertility and the health of his offspring, including advanced age, smoking, stress, trauma, under-nutrition, infection, toxin exposure, and obesity. Many of these factors lead to similar changes to neurological, behavioural, and/or metabolic functioning in offspring. The molecular mechanisms that both respond to the paternal environment and act to transmit traits to offspring are beginning to emerge. This review focuses on three vices of men (alcohol consumption, overweight/obesity, and tobacco smoking) that damage fertility and pose risks to offspring health. These vices are not only the three most prevalent but are also leading risk factors for death and disability adjusted life years (DALYs) worldwide. Moreover, given that these vices are predominantly self-inflicted, interventions aimed at mitigating their consequences are readily identified.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos
Infertilidade Masculina/etiologia
Sobrepeso/complicações
Comportamento Paterno
Fumar/efeitos adversos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Epigênese Genética
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170911
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170911
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170514
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1530/JOE-16-0382


  4 / 1578 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28424518
[Au] Autor:Bendesky A; Kwon YM; Lassance JM; Lewarch CL; Yao S; Peterson BK; He MX; Dulac C; Hoekstra HE
[Ad] Endereço:Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.
[Ti] Título:The genetic basis of parental care evolution in monogamous mice.
[So] Source:Nature;544(7651):434-439, 2017 04 27.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4687
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Parental care is essential for the survival of mammals, yet the mechanisms underlying its evolution remain largely unknown. Here we show that two sister species of mice, Peromyscus polionotus and Peromyscus maniculatus, have large and heritable differences in parental behaviour. Using quantitative genetics, we identify 12 genomic regions that affect parental care, 8 of which have sex-specific effects, suggesting that parental care can evolve independently in males and females. Furthermore, some regions affect parental care broadly, whereas others affect specific behaviours, such as nest building. Of the genes linked to differences in nest-building behaviour, vasopressin is differentially expressed in the hypothalamus of the two species, with increased levels associated with less nest building. Using pharmacology in Peromyscus and chemogenetics in Mus, we show that vasopressin inhibits nest building but not other parental behaviours. Together, our results indicate that variation in an ancient neuropeptide contributes to interspecific differences in parental care.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Genoma/genética
Comportamento Materno
Ligação do Par
Comportamento Paterno
Peromyscus/genética
Peromyscus/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Genômica
Hibridização Genética
Hipotálamo/metabolismo
Masculino
Comportamento Materno/efeitos dos fármacos
Camundongos
Comportamento de Nidação/efeitos dos fármacos
Comportamento Paterno/efeitos dos fármacos
Locos de Características Quantitativas/genética
Caracteres Sexuais
Especificidade da Espécie
Vasopressinas/deficiência
Vasopressinas/genética
Vasopressinas/metabolismo
Vasopressinas/farmacologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
11000-17-2 (Vasopressins)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171109
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171109
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170421
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/nature22074


  5 / 1578 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28410027
[Au] Autor:Kuijper B; Johnstone RA
[Ti] Título:How Sex-Biased Dispersal Affects Sexual Conflict over Care.
[So] Source:Am Nat;189(5):501-514, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1537-5323
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Existing models of parental investment have mainly focused on interactions at the level of the family and have paid much less attention to the impact of population-level processes. Here we extend classical models of parental care to assess the impact of population structure and limited dispersal. We find that sex differences in dispersal substantially affect the amount of care provided by each parent, with the more philopatric sex providing the majority of care to young. This effect is most pronounced in highly viscous populations: in such cases, when classical models would predict stable biparental care, inclusion of a modest sex difference in dispersal leads to uniparental care by the philopatric sex. In addition, mating skew also affects sex differences in parental investment, with the more numerous sex providing most of the care. However, the effect of mating skew holds only when parents care for their own offspring. When individuals breed communally, we recover the previous finding that the more philopatric sex provides most of the care even when it is the rarer sex. We conclude that sex-biased dispersal is likely to be an important yet currently overlooked driver of sex differences in parental care.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Distribuição Animal
Conflito (Psicologia)
Comportamento Materno
Comportamento Paterno
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Masculino
Modelos Biológicos
Reprodução
Fatores Sexuais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170503
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170503
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170415
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1086/691330


  6 / 1578 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28410022
[Au] Autor:Richardson J; Smiseth PT
[Ti] Título:Intraspecific Competition and Inbreeding Depression: Increased Competitive Effort by Inbred Males Is Costly to Outbred Opponents.
[So] Source:Am Nat;189(5):539-548, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1537-5323
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:A recent theoretical model suggests that intraspecific competition is an important determinant of the severity of inbreeding depression. The reason for this is that intraspecific competition is density dependent, leading to a stronger negative effect on inbred individuals if they are weaker competitors than outbred ones. In support of this prediction, previous empirical work shows that inbred individuals are weaker competitors than outbred ones and that intraspecific competition often exacerbates inbreeding depression. Here, we report an experiment on the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides, in which we recorded the outcome of competition over a small vertebrate carcass between an inbred or outbred male resident caring for a brood and a size-matched inbred or outbred male intruder. We found that inbred males were more successful as intruders in taking over a carcass from a male resident and were injured more frequently as either residents or intruders. Furthermore, inbred males gained less mass during the breeding attempt and had a shorter adult life span than outbred males. Finally, successful resident males reared a substantially smaller brood comprised of lighter larvae when the intruder was inbred than when it was outbred. Our results shows that inbred males increased their competitive effort, thus contradicting previous work suggesting that inbred males are weaker competitors. Furthermore, our results shows that inbred intruders impose a greater cost to resident males, suggesting that outbred individuals can suffer fitness costs as a result of competition with inbred ones.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Coleópteros/fisiologia
Depressão por Endogamia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Coleópteros/genética
Coleópteros/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Comportamento Competitivo
Larva/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Masculino
Comportamento Paterno
Comportamento Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170415
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1086/691328


  7 / 1578 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28185863
[Au] Autor:López Alonso D; Ortiz-Rodríguez IM
[Ad] Endereço:Dept. Biología y Geología, Universidad de Almería, Spain. Electronic address: dlopez@ual.es.
[Ti] Título:Offspring mortality was a determinant factor in the evolution of paternal investment in humans: An evolutionary game approach.
[So] Source:J Theor Biol;419:44-51, 2017 Apr 21.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8541
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Some researchers support the belief that man evolved philandering behavior because of the greater reproductive success of promiscuous males. According to this idea, deserting behavior from the man should be expected along with null paternal involvement in offspring care. Paradoxically however, the average offspring investment in the human male is far higher than that of any other male mammal, including other primates. In our work, we have addressed this conundrum by employing evolutionary game theory, using objective payoffs instead of, as are commonly used, arbitrary payoffs. Payoffs were computed as reproductive successes by a model based on trivial probabilities, implemented within the Barreto's Population Dynamics Toolbox (2014). The evolution of the parent conflict was simulated by a game with two players (the woman and the man). First, a simple game was assayed with two strategies, 'desert-unfaithful' and 'care-faithful'. Then, the game was played with a third mixed strategy, 'care-unfaithful'. The two-strategy game results were mainly determined by the offspring survival rate (s) and the non-paternity rate (z), with remaining factors playing a secondary role. Starting from two empirical estimates for both rates (s = 0.617 and z = 0.033) and decreasing the offspring mortality from near 0.4 to 0.1, the results were consistent with a win for the 'care-faithful' strategy. The 'desert-unfaithful' strategy only won at unrealistically high non-paternity rates (z>0.2). When three-strategy games were played, the mixed strategy of 'care-unfaithful' man could win the game in some less frequent cases. Regardless of the number of game strategies, 'care' fathers always won. These results strongly suggest that offspring mortality was the key factor in the evolution of paternal investment within the Homo branch. The 'care-faithful' strategy would have been the main strategy in human evolution but 'care-unfaithful' men did evolve at a lesser frequency. It can therefore be concluded that human populations, under most of the likely ecological situations, would arrive at a polymorphic state where alternative strategies might be present in significant quantity.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Teoria do Jogo
Modelos Teóricos
Comportamento Paterno/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Paternidade
Dinâmica Populacional
Reprodução
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170925
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170925
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170211
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 1578 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28145591
[Au] Autor:Chemnitz J; Bagrii N; Ayasse M; Steiger S
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation Genomics, University of Ulm, 89081, Ulm, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Staying with the young enhances the fathers' attractiveness in burying beetles.
[So] Source:Evolution;71(4):985-994, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1558-5646
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Studying the relationship between parental and mating effort helps us to understand the evolution of parental care and, consequently, has been the subject of many theoretical and empirical investigations. Using burying beetles as a model, we found no correlation between the intensity of a sexual signal (sex pheromone quantity) and the amount of care provided by males. However, males that were given the opportunity to breed and care for young went on to produce a higher amount of their sexual signal and attracted three times more females in the field than control males that were not given the opportunity to breed. The likely explanation for our finding is that specific aspects of care in burying beetles, that is the defense and preservation of a nutrient rich breeding resource, a small vertebrate cadaver, is not only beneficial for the offspring but also for the adults themselves. Obtaining a good carrion meal possibly enables males to store resources that they can subsequently allocate toward sexual signaling. Collectively, our results highlight that conditions can exist where male participation in brood care has a positive effect on its sexual attractiveness. This in turn might have facilitated the evolution of male assistance in parental care.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comunicação Animal
Coleópteros/fisiologia
Atrativos Sexuais/secreção
Comportamento Sexual Animal
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Pai
Masculino
Comportamento Paterno
Reprodução
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Sex Attractants)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/evo.13194


  9 / 1578 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27864585
[Au] Autor:Fortes Carvalho Neta RN; Barbosa GL; Torres HS; Pinheiro Sousa DB; Castro JD; Santos DM; Tchaicka L; Almeida ZD; Teixeira EG; Torres AR
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Chemistry and Biology, State University of Maranhão (UEMA), Campus Paulo VI, Caixa Postal 9, São Luís, Maranhão, 65000-000, Brazil. raimundafortes@yahoo.com.br.
[Ti] Título:Changes in Glutathione S-Transferase Activity and Parental Care Patterns in a Catfish (Pisces, Ariidae) as a Biomarker of Anthropogenic Impact in a Brazilian Harbor.
[So] Source:Arch Environ Contam Toxicol;72(1):132-141, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0703
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Catfish have been used as a model system for studying biochemical mechanisms of biotransformation. The main goal of this study was to identify alterations in hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and changes in the parental care pattern of a mouth-brooding catfish, Sciades herzbergii, as a biomarker of anthropogenic impact in a port area on the northeastern coast of Brazil. The fish were sampled from a natural reserve (A1 = reference site) and from an industrialized port area (A2 = impacted site). Two analyses were carried out: hepatic GST activity and mouth-brooding behavior of males. Catfish collected from the A1 site displayed all stages of gonadal maturation, and some of the adult males were mouth brooding 12-30 embryos. Not all gonadal maturation stages of the catfish were represented at the A2 site, and no mouth-brooding males were observed. GST activity in the liver of S. herzbergii was significantly higher in fish from the impacted site compared with fish from the reference site. Values for the enzymatic activity increased progressively in fish sampled from the reserve area as they became more reproductively mature (immature ≤ maturing ≤ mature ≤ spent). However, the greatest values for GST activity (2.84 ± 0.31 µmol min mg protein ) among fish sampled from the impacted area were found in (immature) juveniles. These data suggest that changes in hepatic GST activity and mouth-brooding behavior of S. herzbergii can be used as biomarkers of anthropogenic impact.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Peixes-Gato/fisiologia
Glutationa Transferase/metabolismo
Comportamento Paterno/efeitos dos fármacos
Poluentes Químicos da Água/toxicidade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Biomarcadores
Brasil
Feminino
Fígado/efeitos dos fármacos
Fígado/enzimologia
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical); EC 2.5.1.18 (Glutathione Transferase)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1701
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170127
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170127
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00244-016-0326-0


  10 / 1578 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27840094
[Au] Autor:Orikasa C; Kondo Y; Katsumata H; Terada M; Akimoto T; Sakuma Y; Minami S
[Ad] Endereço:Institute for Advanced Medical Sciences, Nippon Medical School, Kanagawa 211-8533, Japan. Electronic address: orikasa@nms.ac.jp.
[Ti] Título:Vomeronasal signal deficiency enhances parental behavior in socially isolated male mice.
[So] Source:Physiol Behav;168:98-102, 2017 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1873-507X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We previously reported that social isolation promotes parental care in sexually naïve male mice. This effect was blocked by exposure to chemosensory and auditory social signals derived from males in an adjacent compartment. In the present study, we examined whether the chemosensory signals detected in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) are involved in parental behavior by using mice deficient for a VNO-specific ion channel (Trpc2 ) and thus impaired in VNO-input signaling. We housed virgin homozygous Trpc2 and heterozygous Trpc2 males for 3weeks during puberty (5-8weeks old) alone or in groups of 3-5 males. At 8weeks of age, the mice were placed with three pups in an observation cage and tested for parental behavior. The Trpc2 males housed under isolated conditions spent significantly longer in the vicinity of pups than did the Trpc2 males than had been group housed, whereas no isolation effect was observed in heterozygous Trpc2 males. Both Trpc2 knockout and isolation housing significantly increased the time males spent licking pups and crouching (arched back posture over pups to enable nursing), whereas only isolation housing increased the incidence of retrieval behavior. These results demonstrated that social signals transmitted not only through the VNO but also from other modalities, independent of each other, suppress the expression of parental behavior during puberty in sexually naïve males.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Paterno/fisiologia
Isolamento Social/psicologia
Órgão Vomeronasal/fisiopatologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Análise de Variância
Animais
Animais Recém-Nascidos
Feminino
Masculino
Camundongos
Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL
Camundongos Knockout
Estatísticas não Paramétricas
Canais de Cátion TRPC/deficiência
Canais de Cátion TRPC/genética
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (TRPC Cation Channels); 0 (Trpc2 protein, mouse)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170626
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170626
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161115
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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