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[PMID]:28475619
[Au] Autor:Monroy C; Meyer M; Gerson S; Hunnius S
[Ad] Endereço:Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
[Ti] Título:Statistical learning in social action contexts.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(5):e0177261, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Sensitivity to the regularities and structure contained within sequential, goal-directed actions is an important building block for generating expectations about the actions we observe. Until now, research on statistical learning for actions has solely focused on individual action sequences, but many actions in daily life involve multiple actors in various interaction contexts. The current study is the first to investigate the role of statistical learning in tracking regularities between actions performed by different actors, and whether the social context characterizing their interaction influences learning. That is, are observers more likely to track regularities across actors if they are perceived as acting jointly as opposed to in parallel? We tested adults and toddlers to explore whether social context guides statistical learning and-if so-whether it does so from early in development. In a between-subjects eye-tracking experiment, participants were primed with a social context cue between two actors who either shared a goal of playing together ('Joint' condition) or stated the intention to act alone ('Parallel' condition). In subsequent videos, the actors performed sequential actions in which, for certain action pairs, the first actor's action reliably predicted the second actor's action. We analyzed predictive eye movements to upcoming actions as a measure of learning, and found that both adults and toddlers learned the statistical regularities across actors when their actions caused an effect. Further, adults with high statistical learning performance were sensitive to social context: those who observed actors with a shared goal were more likely to correctly predict upcoming actions. In contrast, there was no effect of social context in the toddler group, regardless of learning performance. These findings shed light on how adults and toddlers perceive statistical regularities across actors depending on the nature of the observed social situation and the resulting effects.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Movimentos Oculares/fisiologia
Aprendizagem por Probabilidade
Comportamento Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Intenção
Masculino
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170911
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170911
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170506
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0177261


  2 / 1332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28319685
[Au] Autor:Trewartha KM; Flanagan JR
[Ad] Endereço:Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada; Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada; Department of Cognitive and Learning Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA; Department of Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA. Electronic address: kmtrewar@mtu.edu.
[Ti] Título:Linking actions and objects: Context-specific learning of novel weight priors.
[So] Source:Cognition;163:121-127, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7838
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Distinct explicit and implicit memory processes support weight predictions used when lifting objects and making perceptual judgments about weight, respectively. The first time that an object is encountered weight is predicted on the basis of learned associations, or priors, linking size and material to weight. A fundamental question is whether the brain maintains a single, global representation of priors, or multiple representations that can be updated in a context specific way. A second key question is whether the updating of priors, or the ability to scale lifting forces when repeatedly lifting unusually weighted objects requires focused attention. To investigate these questions we compared the adaptability of weight predictions used when lifting objects and judging their weights in different groups of participants who experienced size-weight inverted objects passively (with the objects placed on the hands) or actively (where participants lift the objects) under full or divided attention. To assess weight judgments we measured the size-weight illusion after every 20 trials of experience with the inverted objects both passively and actively. The attenuation of the illusion that arises when lifting inverted object was found to be context-specific such that the attenuation was larger when the mode of interaction with the inverted objects matched the method of assessment of the illusion. Dividing attention during interaction with the inverted objects had no effect on attenuation of the illusion, but did slow the rate at which lifting forces were scaled to the weight inverted objects. These findings suggest that the brain stores multiple representations of priors that are context specific, and that focused attention is important for scaling lifting forces, but not for updating weight predictions used when judging object weight.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Julgamento
Memória
Aprendizagem por Probabilidade
Percepção de Tamanho
Percepção de Peso
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Atenção
Seres Humanos
Ilusões
Desempenho Psicomotor
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170830
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170830
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170321
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  3 / 1332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28189707
[Au] Autor:Fleig H; Meiser T; Ettlin F; Rummel J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, University of Mannheim, Schloss Ehrenhof Ost, D-68131 Mannheim, Germany. Electronic address: h.fleig@uni-mannheim.de.
[Ti] Título:Statistical numeracy as a moderator of (pseudo)contingency effects on decision behavior.
[So] Source:Acta Psychol (Amst);174:68-79, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6297
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Pseudocontingencies denote contingency estimates inferred from base rates rather than from cell frequencies. We examined the role of statistical numeracy for effects of such fallible but adaptive inferences on choice behavior. In Experiment 1, we provided information on single observations as well as on base rates and tracked participants' eye movements. In Experiment 2, we manipulated the availability of information on cell frequencies and base rates between conditions. Our results demonstrate that a focus on base rates rather than cell frequencies benefits pseudocontingency effects. Learners who are more proficient in (conditional) probability calculation prefer to rely on cell frequencies in order to judge contingencies, though, as was evident from their gaze behavior. If cell frequencies are available in summarized format, they may infer the true contingency between options and outcomes. Otherwise, however, even highly numerate learners are susceptible to pseudocontingency effects.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento de Escolha/fisiologia
Conceitos Matemáticos
Aprendizagem por Probabilidade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170510
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170510
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170213
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  4 / 1332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28054813
[Au] Autor:Farmer GD; Warren PA; Hahn U
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Neuroscience and Experimental Psychology, University of Manchester.
[Ti] Título:Who "believes" in the Gambler's Fallacy and why?
[So] Source:J Exp Psychol Gen;146(1):63-76, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1939-2222
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Humans possess a remarkable ability to discriminate structure from randomness in the environment. However, this ability appears to be systematically biased. This is nowhere more evident than in the Gambler's Fallacy (GF)-the mistaken belief that observing an increasingly long sequence of "heads" from an unbiased coin makes the occurrence of "tails" on the next trial ever more likely. Although the GF appears to provide evidence of "cognitive bias," a recent theoretical account (Hahn & Warren, 2009) has suggested the GF might be understandable if constraints on actual experience of random sources (such as attention and short term memory) are taken into account. Here we test this experiential account by exposing participants to 200 outcomes from a genuinely random (p = .5) Bernoulli process. All participants saw the same overall sequence; however, we manipulated experience across groups such that the sequence was divided into chunks of length 100, 10, or 5. Both before and after the exposure, participants (a) generated random sequences and (b) judged the randomness of presented sequences. In contrast to other accounts in the literature, the experiential account suggests that this manipulation will lead to systematic differences in postexposure behavior. Our data were strongly in line with this prediction and provide support for a general account of randomness perception in which biases are actually apt reflections of environmental statistics under experiential constraints. This suggests that deeper insight into human cognition may be gained if, instead of dismissing apparent biases as failings, we assume humans are rational under constraints. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cultura
Jogo de Azar/psicologia
Ilusões
Aprendizagem por Probabilidade
Resolução de Problemas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Atenção
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Julgamento
Masculino
Memória de Curto Prazo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171004
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171004
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170106
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/xge0000245


  5 / 1332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27977218
[Au] Autor:Cooper JA; Blanco NJ; Maddox WT
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin.
[Ti] Título:Framing matters: Effects of framing on older adults' exploratory decision-making.
[So] Source:Psychol Aging;32(1):60-68, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1939-1498
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We examined framing effects on exploratory decision-making. In Experiment 1 we tested older and younger adults in two decision-making tasks separated by one week, finding that older adults' decision-making performance was preserved when maximizing gains, but it declined when minimizing losses. Computational modeling indicates that younger adults in both conditions, and older adults in gains maximization, utilized a decreasing threshold strategy (which is optimal), but older adults in losses were better fit by a fixed-probability model of exploration. In Experiment 2 we examined within-subject behavior in older and younger adults in the same exploratory decision-making task, but without a time separation between tasks. We replicated the older adult disadvantage in loss minimization from Experiment 1 and found that the older adult deficit was significantly reduced when the loss-minimization task immediately followed the gains-maximization task. We conclude that older adults' performance in exploratory decision-making is hindered when framed as loss minimization, but that this deficit is attenuated when older adults can first develop a strategy in a gains-framed task. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Envelhecimento/psicologia
Tomada de Decisões
Comportamento Exploratório
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Simulação por Computador
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Motivação
Exame Físico
Probabilidade
Aprendizagem por Probabilidade
Resolução de Problemas
Jogos de Vídeo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; WEBCASTS
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170817
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170817
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/pag0000146


  6 / 1332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27939187
[Au] Autor:Daikoku T; Yatomi Y; Yumoto M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Clinical Laboratory, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan.
[Ti] Título:Statistical learning of an auditory sequence and reorganization of acquired knowledge: A time course of word segmentation and ordering.
[So] Source:Neuropsychologia;95:1-10, 2017 Jan 27.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3514
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Previous neural studies have supported the hypothesis that statistical learning mechanisms are used broadly across different domains such as language and music. However, these studies have only investigated a single aspect of statistical learning at a time, such as recognizing word boundaries or learning word order patterns. In this study, we neutrally investigated how the two levels of statistical learning for recognizing word boundaries and word ordering could be reflected in neuromagnetic responses and how acquired statistical knowledge is reorganised when the syntactic rules are revised. Neuromagnetic responses to the Japanese-vowel sequence (a, e, i, o, and u), presented every .45s, were recorded from 14 right-handed Japanese participants. The vowel order was constrained by a Markov stochastic model such that five nonsense words (aue, eao, iea, oiu, and uoi) were chained with an either-or rule: the probability of the forthcoming word was statistically defined (80% for one word; 20% for the other word) by the most recent two words. All of the word transition probabilities (80% and 20%) were switched in the middle of the sequence. In the first and second quarters of the sequence, the neuromagnetic responses to the words that appeared with higher transitional probability were significantly reduced compared with those that appeared with a lower transitional probability. After switching the word transition probabilities, the response reduction was replicated in the last quarter of the sequence. The responses to the final vowels in the words were significantly reduced compared with those to the initial vowels in the last quarter of the sequence. The results suggest that both within-word and between-word statistical learning are reflected in neural responses. The present study supports the hypothesis that listeners learn larger structures such as phrases first, and they subsequently extract smaller structures, such as words, from the learned phrases. The present study provides the first neurophysiological evidence that the correction of statistical knowledge requires more time than the acquisition of new statistical knowledge.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Encéfalo/fisiologia
Aprendizagem por Probabilidade
Percepção da Fala/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Estimulação Acústica/métodos
Adulto
Potenciais Evocados
Feminino
Lateralidade Funcional/fisiologia
Seres Humanos
Magnetoencefalografia
Masculino
Cadeias de Markov
Meia-Idade
Modelos Estatísticos
Testes Neuropsicológicos
Recognição (Psicologia)/fisiologia
Fatores de Tempo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170508
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170508
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161213
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 1332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27907807
[Au] Autor:Endress AD; Langus A
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, City, University of London, UK. Electronic address: ansgar.endress.1@city.ac.uk.
[Ti] Título:Transitional probabilities count more than frequency, but might not be used for memorization.
[So] Source:Cogn Psychol;92:37-64, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1095-5623
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Learners often need to extract recurring items from continuous sequences, in both vision and audition. The best-known example is probably found in word-learning, where listeners have to determine where words start and end in fluent speech. This could be achieved through universal and experience-independent statistical mechanisms, for example by relying on Transitional Probabilities (TPs). Further, these mechanisms might allow learners to store items in memory. However, previous investigations have yielded conflicting evidence as to whether a sensitivity to TPs is diagnostic of the memorization of recurring items. Here, we address this issue in the visual modality. Participants were familiarized with a continuous sequence of visual items (i.e., arbitrary or everyday symbols), and then had to choose between (i) high-TP items that appeared in the sequence, (ii) high-TP items that did not appear in the sequence, and (iii) low-TP items that appeared in the sequence. Items matched in TPs but differing in (chunk) frequency were much harder to discriminate than items differing in TPs (with no significant sensitivity to chunk frequency), and learners preferred unattested high-TP items over attested low-TP items. Contrary to previous claims, these results cannot be explained on the basis of the similarity of the test items. Learners thus weigh within-item TPs higher than the frequency of the chunks, even when the TP differences are relatively subtle. We argue that these results are problematic for distributional clustering mechanisms that analyze continuous sequences, and provide supporting computational results. We suggest that the role of TPs might not be to memorize items per se, but rather to prepare learners to memorize recurring items once they are presented in subsequent learning situations with richer cues.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Memória
Aprendizagem por Probabilidade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Comportamento de Escolha
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Estimulação Luminosa
Probabilidade
Recognição (Psicologia)
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170816
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170816
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161202
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 1332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27906526
[Au] Autor:Aslin RN
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
[Ti] Título:Statistical learning: a powerful mechanism that operates by mere exposure.
[So] Source:Wiley Interdiscip Rev Cogn Sci;8(1-2), 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1939-5086
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:How do infants learn so rapidly and with little apparent effort? In 1996, Saffran, Aslin, and Newport reported that 8-month-old human infants could learn the underlying temporal structure of a stream of speech syllables after only 2 min of passive listening. This demonstration of what was called statistical learning, involving no instruction, reinforcement, or feedback, led to dozens of confirmations of this powerful mechanism of implicit learning in a variety of modalities, domains, and species. These findings reveal that infants are not nearly as dependent on explicit forms of instruction as we might have assumed from studies of learning in which children or adults are taught facts such as math or problem solving skills. Instead, at least in some domains, infants soak up the information around them by mere exposure. Learning and development in these domains thus appear to occur automatically and with little active involvement by an instructor (parent or teacher). The details of this statistical learning mechanism are discussed, including how exposure to specific types of information can, under some circumstances, generalize to never-before-observed information, thereby enabling transfer of learning. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1373. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1373 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aprendizagem
Aprendizagem por Probabilidade
Psicologia do Desenvolvimento
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Animais
Seres Humanos
Lactente
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1703
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170324
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170324
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/wcs.1373


  9 / 1332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27890827
[Au] Autor:Khan A; de Jong LA; Kamenski ME; Higa KK; Lucero JD; Young JW; Behrens MM; Powell SB
[Ad] Endereço:Dept of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States; Research Service, VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA, United States.
[Ti] Título:Adolescent GBR12909 exposure induces oxidative stress, disrupts parvalbumin-positive interneurons, and leads to hyperactivity and impulsivity in adult mice.
[So] Source:Neuroscience;345:166-175, 2017 Mar 14.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7544
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The adolescent period in mammals is a critical period of brain maturation and thus represents a time of susceptibility to environmental insult, e.g. psychosocial stress and/or drugs of abuse, which may cause lasting impairments in brain function and behavior and even precipitate symptoms in at-risk individuals. One likely effect of these environmental insults is to increase oxidative stress in the developing adolescent brain. Indeed, there is increasing evidence that redox dysregulation plays an important role in the development of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders and that GABA interneurons are particularly susceptible to alterations in oxidative stress. The current study sought to model this adolescent neurochemical "stress" by exposing mice to the dopamine transporter inhibitor GBR12909 (5mg/kg; IP) during adolescence (postnatal day 35-44) and measuring the resultant effect on locomotor behavior and probabilistic reversal learning as well as GABAergic interneurons and oxidative stress in adulthood. C57BL6/J mice exposed to GBR12909 showed increased activity in a novel environment and increased impulsivity as measured by premature responding in the probabilistic reversal learning task. Adolescent GBR12909-exposed mice also showed decreased parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactivity in the prefrontal cortex, which was accompanied by increased oxidative stress in PV+ neurons. These findings indicate that adolescent exposure to a dopamine transporter inhibitor results in loss of PV in GABAergic interneurons, elevations in markers of oxidative stress, and alterations in behavior in adulthood.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Impulsivo/efeitos dos fármacos
Interneurônios/efeitos dos fármacos
Atividade Motora/efeitos dos fármacos
Estresse Oxidativo/efeitos dos fármacos
Piperazinas/toxicidade
Córtex Pré-Frontal/efeitos dos fármacos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Neurônios GABAérgicos/efeitos dos fármacos
Neurônios GABAérgicos/metabolismo
Neurônios GABAérgicos/patologia
Hipercinese/metabolismo
Hipercinese/patologia
Comportamento Impulsivo/fisiologia
Interneurônios/metabolismo
Interneurônios/patologia
Masculino
Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL
Atividade Motora/fisiologia
Estresse Oxidativo/fisiologia
Parvalbuminas/metabolismo
Córtex Pré-Frontal/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Córtex Pré-Frontal/metabolismo
Córtex Pré-Frontal/patologia
Aprendizagem por Probabilidade
Reversão de Aprendizagem/efeitos dos fármacos
Reversão de Aprendizagem/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Parvalbumins); 0 (Piperazines); 90X28IKH43 (vanoxerine)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171109
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171109
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161129
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  10 / 1332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27766351
[Au] Autor:Seyed Majidi N; Verhage MC; Donchin O; Holland P; Frens MA; van der Geest JN
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Neuroscience (Ee1202), Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, 3000, CA, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Título:Cerebellar tDCS does not improve performance in probabilistic classification learning.
[So] Source:Exp Brain Res;235(2):421-428, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1106
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In this study, the role of the cerebellum in a cognitive learning task using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was investigated. Using a weather prediction task, subjects had to learn the probabilistic associations between a stimulus (a combination of cards) and an outcome (sun or rain). This task is a variant of a probabilistic classification learning task, for which it has been reported that prefrontal tDCS enhances performance. Using a between-subject design, all 30 subjects learned to improve their performance with increasing accuracies and shortened response times over a series of 500 trials. Subjects also became more confident in their prediction during the experiment. However, no differences in performance and learning were observed between subjects receiving sham stimulation (n = 10) or anodal stimulation (2 mA for 20 min) over either the right cerebellum (n = 10) or the left prefrontal cortex (n = 10). This suggests that stimulating the brain with cerebellar tDCS does not readily influence probabilistic classification performances, probably due to the rather complex nature of this cognitive task.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cerebelo/fisiologia
Aprendizagem por Probabilidade
Estimulação Transcraniana por Corrente Contínua
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Análise de Variância
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Testes Neuropsicológicos
Estimulação Luminosa
Tempo de Reação/fisiologia
Inquéritos e Questionários
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170830
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170830
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161022
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00221-016-4800-8



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