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[PMID]:28991876
[Au] Autor:Cauchy F; Farges O; Vibert E; Boleslawski E; Pruvot FR; Regimbeau JM; Mabrut JY; Scatton O; Adham M; Laurent C; Grégoire E; Delpero JR; Bachellier P; Soubrane O
[Ad] Endereço:*Department of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Hôpital Beaujon, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Paris 7, Clichy, France †Department of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Hôpital Paul Brousse, Villejuif, France ‡Department of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Hôpital Claude Huriez, Lille, France §Department of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery, Hôpital Nord, Amiens, France ¶Department of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Hôpital Croix Rousse, Lyon, France ||Department of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Paris, France **Department of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France ††Department of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Hôpital Saint André, Bordeaux, France ‡‡Department of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Hôpital de la Conception, Marseille, France §§Department of Surgical Oncology, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France ¶¶Department of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Hôpital de Hautepierre, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.
[Ti] Título:Sensitizing Surgeons to Their Outcome Has No Measurable Short-term Benefit.
[So] Source:Ann Surg;266(5):884-889, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1528-1140
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: Investigate if involving surgeons in outcome prediction-research and having them use a dedicated Electronic-Health-Record that provides feedback, improves patients' outcome. BACKGROUND: Improvement of clinical outcome mainly relies on the declaration of adverse events, identification of their predictors, self-assessment, and feedback. METHODS: Thirteen French Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary-centers made commitment to include all patients undergoing elective hepatectomies in an observational study. Each center was given access to a dedicated website, where perioperative data were prospectively collected. The website provided real-time individual and comparative feedback of outcome and was also intended to perform prognostication studies. The hypothesis was that by using this strategy, the length-of-stay would be reduced by 10%. Power-calculation implied the inclusion of 1720 patients. Secondary endpoints were 90-day mortality, severe morbidity, and the comprehensive-complication index. RESULTS: Only 5 of the 13 participating centers were fully compliant in enrolling their patients and the inclusion period was extended by 1-year (October 2012-October 2015) to meet the objective. During this period, the collaborative group published 9 studies based on the study data (median impact factor = 8.327) that identified quantitative clinical variables, qualitative clinical variables, and nonclinical variables influencing outcome. For patients enrolled by the 5 active centers (n = 1752), there was no improvement in length of stay (13.3 vs 12.4 days, P = 0.287), severe complications (23.6 vs 20.5%, P = 0.134), the complication comprehensive index (24.0 vs 24.9, P = 0.448), mortality (4.1 vs 3.9%, P = 0.903), or unplanned readmissions (7.2 vs 8.4%, P = 0.665), even after adjusting for confounders. CONCLUSION: Simply sensitizing surgeons to their outcome has no measurable short-term clinical benefit.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Competência Clínica/estatística & dados numéricos
Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Eletivos/normas
Retroalimentação Psicológica
Hepatectomia/normas
Conhecimento de Resultados (Psicologia)
Autoavaliação
Cirurgiões/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Eletivos/mortalidade
Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde
Feminino
Seguimentos
França
Hepatectomia/mortalidade
Seres Humanos
Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Avaliação de Processos e Resultados (Cuidados de Saúde)
Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia
Complicações Pós-Operatórias/prevenção & controle
Estudos Prospectivos
Melhoria de Qualidade
Cirurgiões/normas
Cirurgiões/estatística & dados numéricos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171018
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171018
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171010
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/SLA.0000000000002403


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[PMID]:28243778
[Au] Autor:Hamilton AR; Behm DG
[Ad] Endereço:Kinesiology, School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 230 Elizabeth Ave., St. John's, NL, A1C 5S7, Canada.
[Ti] Título:The effect of prior knowledge of test endpoint on non-local muscle fatigue.
[So] Source:Eur J Appl Physiol;117(4):651-663, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1439-6327
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:INTRODUCTION: If the work duration or volume is known, it is common for individuals to anticipate this challenge by pursuing a strategy that may decrease the initial force output and maintain a force level that ensures a force reserve towards the end of the task. However, it is unknown whether this is a global strategy that is transferred to a non-exercised muscle following fatigue of a contralateral homologous muscle. METHODS: To clarify if prior knowledge of task endpoint has an effect on non-local muscle fatigue (NLMF), 15 male participants (22.4 ± 3.8 years) completed four conditions: (1) KNtest > fatigue (known endpoint after fatigue), (2) UNKtest > fatigue (unknown endpoint after fatigue), (3) KNtest > control (known endpoint without fatigue), (4) UNKtest > control (unknown endpoint without fatigue). For fatigue conditions, a maximal intensity, unilateral knee extension protocol was completed (two sets of 100 s maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) with 60 s rest between), whereas the control condition involved rest (260 s). The participants were either informed (known (KN) conditions) or not informed (unknown (UNK) conditions) of the duration of a post-intervention strength-endurance test (contralateral knee extension MVIC, ≥30 s). RESULTS: During the strength-endurance test, the UNKtest > fatigue displayed meaningful decreases in force (UNKtest > fatigue 10-12% over first 30 s), which was largest at the 25-30-s period (UNKtest > fatigue 7.4-41.1% from 25 to 1930s) compared to KNtest > fatigue and KNtest > control conditions, respectively. CONCLUSION: Prior knowledge of task endpoint can modify NLMF and affect pacing strategies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conhecimento de Resultados (Psicologia)
Fadiga Muscular
Músculo Esquelético/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Exercício
Seres Humanos
Joelho/fisiologia
Masculino
Força Muscular
Distribuição Aleatória
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171005
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171005
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170301
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00421-016-3526-4


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[PMID]:27831907
[Au] Autor:Gregson RK; Cole TJ; Skellett S; Bagkeris E; Welsby D; Peters MJ
[Ad] Endereço:UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, UK.
[Ti] Título:Randomised crossover trial of rate feedback and force during chest compressions for paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
[So] Source:Arch Dis Child;102(5):403-409, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1468-2044
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of visual feedback on rate of chest compressions, secondarily relating the forces used. DESIGN: Randomised crossover trial. SETTING: Tertiary teaching hospital. SUBJECTS: Fifty trained hospital staff. INTERVENTIONS: A thin sensor-mat placed over the manikin's chest measured rate and force. Rescuers applied compressions to the same paediatric manikin for two sessions. During one session they received visual feedback comparing their real-time rate with published guidelines. OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary: compression rate. Secondary: compression and residual forces. RESULTS: Rate of chest compressions (compressions per minute (compressions per minute; cpm)) varied widely (mean (SD) 111 (13), range 89-168), with a fourfold difference in variation during session 1 between those receiving and not receiving feedback (108 (5) vs 120 (20)). The interaction of session by feedback order was highly significant, indicating that this difference in mean rate between sessions was 14 cpm less (95% CI -22 to -5, p=0.002) in those given feedback first compared with those given it second. Compression force (N) varied widely (mean (SD) 306 (94); range 142-769). Those receiving feedback second (as opposed to first) used significantly lower force (adjusted mean difference -80 (95% CI -128 to -32), p=0.002). Mean residual force (18 N, SD 12, range 0-49) was unaffected by the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: While visual feedback restricted excessive compression rates to within the prescribed range, applied force remained widely variable. The forces required may differ with growth, but such variation treating one manikin is alarming. Feedback technologies additionally measuring force (effort) could help to standardise and define effective treatments throughout childhood.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Reanimação Cardiopulmonar/educação
Educação Continuada/métodos
Retroalimentação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Reanimação Cardiopulmonar/métodos
Reanimação Cardiopulmonar/normas
Criança
Competência Clínica
Estudos Cross-Over
Avaliação Educacional/métodos
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Conhecimento de Resultados (Psicologia)
Masculino
Manequins
Esforço Físico
Pressão
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170922
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170922
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161111
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/archdischild-2016-310691


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[PMID]:27619079
[Au] Autor:Doig E; Fleming J; Ownsworth T; Fletcher S
[Ad] Endereço:School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
[Ti] Título:An occupation-based, metacognitive approach to assessing error performance and online awareness.
[So] Source:Aust Occup Ther J;64(2):137-148, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1440-1630
[Cp] País de publicação:Australia
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND/AIM: Online awareness is the ability to self-monitor, identify and self-correct errors while engaged in an activity. Current assessments of online awareness involve observing and classifying error behaviour during structured, uniform tasks. However, during rehabilitation, practitioners typically work towards improving performance in individually meaningful tasks unique to the client. This article presents a metacognitive, task analytic approach to assessing online awareness involving observation and classification of errors during meaningful occupations determined after client-centred goal setting with two male clients with severe traumatic brain injury (aged 22 and 23). Study aims were to describe the approach, evaluate its feasibility and determine inter-rater agreement for error detection and error categorisation by two experienced occupational therapists. Furthermore, the error profiles and cognitive impairments of the participants on standardised neuropsychological assessment were examined to explore the validity of the assessment. METHODS: Individualised assessment tasks included snack preparation, budgeting, timetabling, hot-drink preparation and use of a computer program, which were administered repeatedly over two to three months and audio-visual recordings taken. Independent ratings of two trained occupational therapists were compared using exact percent agreement. RESULTS: Overall agreement about errors was 76%, for which there was 65% agreement about error categorisation and 100% agreement about error correction. CONCLUSIONS: There was fair inter-rater agreement between two trained occupational therapists of error behaviour and error correction when using the described occupation-based approach to assessing online awareness. This approach has promise, particularly when combined with standardised, neuropsychological assessments, for providing an in-depth understanding of error behaviour and awareness of errors during meaningful occupations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Lesões Encefálicas/complicações
Disfunção Cognitiva/diagnóstico
Erros de Diagnóstico/prevenção & controle
Conhecimento de Resultados (Psicologia)
Terapeutas Ocupacionais/normas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Conscientização
Disfunção Cognitiva/etiologia
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Testes Neuropsicológicos
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171023
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171023
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160914
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/1440-1630.12322


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[PMID]:26892773
[Au] Autor:Carter MJ; Ste-Marie DM
[Ad] Endereço:School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, 125 University Private, Ottawa, ON, Canada. carterjmike@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:An interpolated activity during the knowledge-of-results delay interval eliminates the learning advantages of self-controlled feedback schedules.
[So] Source:Psychol Res;81(2):399-406, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1430-2772
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The learning advantages of self-controlled knowledge-of-results (KR) schedules compared to yoked schedules have been linked to the optimization of the informational value of the KR received for the enhancement of one's error-detection capabilities. This suggests that information-processing activities that occur after motor execution, but prior to receiving KR (i.e., the KR-delay interval) may underlie self-controlled KR learning advantages. The present experiment investigated whether self-controlled KR learning benefits would be eliminated if an interpolated activity was performed during the KR-delay interval. Participants practiced a waveform matching task that required two rapid elbow extension-flexion reversals in one of four groups using a factorial combination of choice (self-controlled, yoked) and KR-delay interval (empty, interpolated). The waveform had specific spatial and temporal constraints, and an overall movement time goal. The results indicated that the self-controlled + empty group had superior retention and transfer scores compared to all other groups. Moreover, the self-controlled + interpolated and yoked + interpolated groups did not differ significantly in retention and transfer; thus, the interpolated activity eliminated the typically found learning benefits of self-controlled KR. No significant differences were found between the two yoked groups. We suggest the interpolated activity interfered with information-processing activities specific to self-controlled KR conditions that occur during the KR-delay interval and that these activities are vital for reaping the associated learning benefits. These findings add to the growing evidence that challenge the motivational account of self-controlled KR learning advantages and instead highlights informational factors associated with the KR-delay interval as an important variable for motor learning under self-controlled KR schedules.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Retroalimentação Psicológica
Conhecimento de Resultados (Psicologia)
Prática (Psicologia)
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Individualidade
Masculino
Destreza Motora
Desempenho Psicomotor
Fatores de Tempo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171006
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171006
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160220
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00426-016-0757-2


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[PMID]:27165008
[Au] Autor:Plantinga M; Birnie E; Abbott KM; Sinke RJ; Lucassen AM; Schuurmans J; Kaplan S; Verkerk MA; Ranchor AV; van Langen IM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Genetics, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Título:Population-based preconception carrier screening: how potential users from the general population view a test for 50 serious diseases.
[So] Source:Eur J Hum Genet;24(10):1417-23, 2016 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5438
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:With the increased international focus on personalized health care and preventive medicine, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has substantially expanded the options for carrier screening of serious, recessively inherited diseases. NGS screening tests not only offer reproductive options not previously available to couples, but they may also ultimately reduce the number of children born with devastating disorders. To date, preconception carrier screening (PCS) has largely targeted single diseases such as cystic fibrosis, but NGS allows the testing of many genes or diseases simultaneously. We have developed an expanded NGS PCS test for couples; simultaneously it covers 50 very serious, early-onset, autosomal recessive diseases that are untreatable. This is the first, noncommercial, population-based, expanded PCS test to be offered prospectively to couples in a health-care setting in Europe. So far, little is known about how potential users view such a PCS test. We therefore performed an online survey in 2014 among 500 people from the target population in the Netherlands. We enquired about their intention to take an expanded PCS test if one was offered, and through which provider they would like to see it offered. One-third of the respondents said they would take such a test were it to be offered. The majority (44%) preferred the test to be offered via their general practitioner (GP) and 58% would be willing to pay for the test, with a median cost of [euro ]75. Our next step is to perform an implementation study in which this PCS test will be provided via selected GPs in the Northern Netherlands.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atitude Frente à Saúde
Aconselhamento Genético/psicologia
Testes Genéticos
Heterozigoto
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Fibrose Cística/diagnóstico
Fibrose Cística/genética
Fibrose Cística/psicologia
Seres Humanos
Conhecimento de Resultados (Psicologia)
Países Baixos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170616
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170616
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160512
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/ejhg.2016.43


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[PMID]:27049302
[Au] Autor:McCormack P; Kole A; Gainotti S; Mascalzoni D; Molster C; Lochmüller H; Woods S
[Ad] Endereço:PEALS Research Centre, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
[Ti] Título:'You should at least ask'. The expectations, hopes and fears of rare disease patients on large-scale data and biomaterial sharing for genomics research.
[So] Source:Eur J Hum Genet;24(10):1403-8, 2016 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5438
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Within the myriad articles about participants' opinions of genomics research, the views of a distinct group - people with a rare disease (RD) - are unknown. It is important to understand if their opinions differ from the general public by dint of having a rare disease and vulnerabilities inherent in this. Here we document RD patients' attitudes to participation in genomics research, particularly around large-scale, international data and biosample sharing. This work is unique in exploring the views of people with a range of rare disorders from many different countries. The authors work within an international, multidisciplinary consortium, RD-Connect, which has developed an integrated platform connecting databases, registries, biobanks and clinical bioinformatics for RD research. Focus groups were conducted with 52 RD patients from 16 countries. Using a scenario-based approach, participants were encouraged to raise topics relevant to their own experiences, rather than these being determined by the researcher. Issues include wide data sharing, and consent for new uses of historic samples and for children. Focus group members are positively disposed towards research and towards allowing data and biosamples to be shared internationally. Expressions of trust and attitudes to risk are often affected by the nature of the RD which they have experience of, as well as regulatory and cultural practices in their home country. Participants are concerned about data security and misuse. There is an acute recognition of the vulnerability inherent in having a RD and the possibility that open knowledge of this could lead to discrimination.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/ética
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Doenças Raras/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Bases de Dados Factuais
União Europeia
Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/normas
Seres Humanos
Disseminação de Informação/ética
Conhecimento de Resultados (Psicologia)
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171110
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171110
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160407
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/ejhg.2016.30


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[PMID]:27033133
[Au] Autor:Gipson CL; Gorman JC; Hessler EE
[Ad] Endereço:Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.
[Ti] Título:Top-down (Prior Knowledge) and Bottom-up (Perceptual Modality) Influences on Spontaneous Interpersonal Synchronization.
[So] Source:Nonlinear Dynamics Psychol Life Sci;20(2):193-222, 2016 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1090-0578
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Coordination with others is such a fundamental part of human activity that it can happen unintentionally. This unintentional coordination can manifest as synchronization and is observed in physical and human systems alike. We investigated the role of top-down influences (prior knowledge of the perceptual modality their partner is using) and bottom-up factors (perceptual modality combination) on spontaneous interpersonal synchronization. We examine this phenomena with respect to two different theoretical perspectives that differently emphasize top-down and bottom-up factors in interpersonal synchronization: joint-action/shared cognition theories and ecological-interactive theories. In an empirical study twelve dyads performed a finger oscillation task while attending to each other's movements through either visual, auditory, or visual and auditory perceptual modalities. Half of the participants were given prior knowledge of their partner's perceptual capabilities for coordinating across these different perceptual modality combinations. We found that the effect of top-down influence depends on the perceptual modality combination between two individuals. When people used the same perceptual modalities, top-down influence resulted in less synchronization and when people used different perceptual modalities, top-down influence resulted in more synchronization. Furthermore, persistence in the change in behavior as a result of having perceptual information about each other ('social memory') was stronger when this top-down influence was present.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Percepção Auditiva
Relações Interpessoais
Conhecimento de Resultados (Psicologia)
Rememoração Mental
Comunicação não Verbal
Teoria Psicológica
Percepção Visual
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Dinâmica não Linear
Privação Sensorial
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Mês de entrada:1607
[Cu] Atualização por classe:160401
[Lr] Data última revisão:
160401
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160402
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:26897261
[Au] Autor:Andrew M; Bennett SJ; Elliott D; Hayes SJ
[Ad] Endereço:Brain and Behaviour Laboratory, Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Science, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK.
[Ti] Título:Complimentary lower-level and higher-order systems underpin imitation learning.
[So] Source:Brain Cogn;104:25-33, 2016 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2147
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We examined whether the temporal representation developed during motor training with reduced-frequency knowledge of results (KR; feedback available on every other trial) was transferred to an imitation learning task. To this end, four groups first practised a three-segment motor sequence task with different KR protocols. Two experimental groups received reduced-frequency KR, one group received high-frequency KR (feedback available on every trial), and one received no-KR. Compared to the no-KR group, the groups that received KR learned the temporal goal of the movement sequence, as evidenced by increased accuracy and consistency across training. Next, all groups learned a single-segment movement that had the same temporal goal as the motor sequence task but required the imitation of biological and nonbiological motion kinematics. Kinematic data showed that whilst all groups imitated biological motion kinematics, the two experimental reduced-frequency KR groups were on average ∼ 800 ms more accurate at imitating movement time than the high-frequency KR and no-KR groups. The interplay between learning biological motion kinematics and the transfer of temporal representation indicates imitation involves distinct, but complementary lower-level sensorimotor and higher-level cognitive processing systems.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Imitativo/fisiologia
Conhecimento de Resultados (Psicologia)
Aprendizagem/fisiologia
Movimento
Transferência de Experiência (Psicologia)
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Fenômenos Biomecânicos
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Destreza Motora
Distribuição Aleatória
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1611
[Cu] Atualização por classe:161230
[Lr] Data última revisão:
161230
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160222
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:26874750
[Au] Autor:Post PG; Aiken CA; Laughlin DD; Fairbrother JT
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Kinesiology and Dance, New Mexico State University, United States. Electronic address: ppost@nmsu.edu.
[Ti] Título:Self-control over combined video feedback and modeling facilitates motor learning.
[So] Source:Hum Mov Sci;47:49-59, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7646
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Allowing learners to control the video presentation of knowledge of performance (KP) or an expert model during practice has been shown to facilitate motor learning (Aiken, Fairbrother, & Post, 2012; Wulf, Raupach, & Pfeiffer, 2005). Split-screen replay features now allow for the simultaneous presentation of these modes of instructional support. It is uncertain, however, if such a combination incorporated into a self-control protocol would yield similar benefits seen in earlier self-control studies. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of self-controlled split-screen replay on the learning of a golf chip shot. Participants completed 60 practice trials, three administrations of the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory, and a questionnaire on day one. Retention and transfer tests and a final motivation inventory were completed on day two. Results revealed significantly higher form and accuracy scores for the self-control group during transfer. The self-control group also had significantly higher scores on the perceived competence subscale, reported requesting feedback mostly after perceived poor trials, and recalled a greater number of critical task features compared to the yoked group. The findings for the performance measures were consistent with previous self-control research.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conhecimento de Resultados (Psicologia)
Aprendizagem
Destreza Motora
Autocontrole
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Feminino
Golfe
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Motivação
Transferência de Experiência (Psicologia)
Gravação em Vídeo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1701
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170624
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170624
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160215
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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