Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : F02.463.425.770.836 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 16228 [refinar]
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  1 / 16228 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29300018
[Ti] Título:Reward research that changes society.
[So] Source:Nature;553(7686):5, 2018 01 04.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4687
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Publicações Periódicas como Assunto/tendências
Apoio à Pesquisa como Assunto/tendências
Pesquisa
Recompensa
Mudança Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Bases de Dados Factuais
Seres Humanos
Pesquisa/economia
Pesquisa/normas
Qualidade da Água
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:EDITORIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180105
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/d41586-017-08943-6


  2 / 16228 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28466068
[Au] Autor:McMurray MS; Conway SM; Roitman JD
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056.
[Ti] Título:Brain Stimulation Reward Supports More Consistent and Accurate Rodent Decision-Making than Food Reward.
[So] Source:eNeuro;4(2), 2017 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:2373-2822
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Animal models of decision-making rely on an animal's motivation to decide and its ability to detect differences among various alternatives. Food reinforcement, although commonly used, is associated with problematic confounds, especially satiety. Here, we examined the use of brain stimulation reward (BSR) as an alternative reinforcer in rodent models of decision-making and compared it with the effectiveness of sugar pellets. The discriminability of various BSR frequencies was compared to differing numbers of sugar pellets in separate free-choice tasks. We found that BSR was more discriminable and motivated greater task engagement and more consistent preference for the larger reward. We then investigated whether rats prefer BSR of varying frequencies over sugar pellets. We found that animals showed either a clear preference for sugar reward or no preference between reward modalities, depending on the frequency of the BSR alternative and the size of the sugar reward. Overall, these results suggest that BSR is an effective reinforcer in rodent decision-making tasks, removing food-related confounds and resulting in more accurate, consistent, and reliable metrics of choice.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Encéfalo/fisiologia
Comportamento de Escolha/fisiologia
Tomada de Decisões/fisiologia
Reforço (Psicologia)
Recompensa
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Condicionamento Operante/fisiologia
Estimulação Elétrica
Alimentos
Masculino
Motivação/fisiologia
Ratos Long-Evans
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  3 / 16228 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28462394
[Au] Autor:Holper L; Van Brussel LD; Schmidt L; Schulthess S; Burke CJ; Louie K; Seifritz E; Tobler PN
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychiatry Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Zurich, 8032 Zurich, Switzerland.
[Ti] Título:Adaptive Value Normalization in the Prefrontal Cortex Is Reduced by Memory Load.
[So] Source:eNeuro;4(2), 2017 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:2373-2822
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Adaptation facilitates neural representation of a wide range of diverse inputs, including reward values. Adaptive value coding typically relies on contextual information either obtained from the environment or retrieved from and maintained in memory. However, it is unknown whether having to retrieve and maintain context information modulates the brain's capacity for value adaptation. To address this issue, we measured hemodynamic responses of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in two studies on risky decision-making. In each trial, healthy human subjects chose between a risky and a safe alternative; half of the participants had to remember the risky alternatives, whereas for the other half they were presented visually. The value of safe alternatives varied across trials. PFC responses adapted to contextual risk information, with steeper coding of safe alternative value in lower-risk contexts. Importantly, this adaptation depended on working memory load, such that response functions relating PFC activity to safe values were steeper with presented versus remembered risk. An independent second study replicated the findings of the first study and showed that similar slope reductions also arose when memory maintenance demands were increased with a secondary working memory task. Formal model comparison showed that a divisive normalization model fitted effects of both risk context and working memory demands on PFC activity better than alternative models of value adaptation, and revealed that reduced suppression of background activity was the critical parameter impairing normalization with increased memory maintenance demand. Our findings suggest that mnemonic processes can constrain normalization of neural value representations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Tomada de Decisões/fisiologia
Memória/fisiologia
Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia
Recompensa
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Estimulação Luminosa/métodos
Tempo de Reação/fisiologia
Risco
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  4 / 16228 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28456841
[Au] Autor:Blanco-Gandía MC; Aracil-Fernández A; Montagud-Romero S; Aguilar MA; Manzanares J; Miñarro J; Rodríguez-Arias M
[Ad] Endereço:Departamento de Psicobiología, Facultad de Psicología, Unidad de Investigación Psicobiología de las Drogodependencias, , Universitat de València, Avda. Blasco Ibáñez, 21, 46010, Valencia, Spain.
[Ti] Título:Changes in gene expression and sensitivity of cocaine reward produced by a continuous fat diet.
[So] Source:Psychopharmacology (Berl);234(15):2337-2352, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2072
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:RATIONALE: Preclinical studies report that free access to a high-fat diet (HFD) alters the response to psychostimulants. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to examine how HFD exposure during adolescence modifies cocaine effects. Gene expression of CB1 and mu-opioid receptors (MOr) in the nucleus accumbens (N Acc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and ghrelin receptor (GHSR) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were assessed. METHODS: Mice were allowed continuous access to fat from PND 29, and the locomotor (10 mg/kg) and reinforcing effects of cocaine (1 and 6 mg/kg) on conditioned place preference (CPP) were evaluated on PND 69. Another group of mice was exposed to a standard diet until the day of post-conditioning, on which free access to the HFD began. RESULTS: HFD induced an increase of MOr gene expression in the N Acc, but decreased CB1 receptor in the N Acc and PFC. After fat withdrawal, the reduction of CB1 receptor in the N Acc was maintained. Gene expression of GHSR in the VTA decreased during the HFD and increased after withdrawal. Following fat discontinuation, mice exhibited increased anxiety, augmented locomotor response to cocaine, and developed CPP for 1 mg/kg cocaine. HFD reduced the number of sessions required to extinguish the preference and decreased sensitivity to drug priming-induced reinstatement. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that consumption of a HFD during adolescence induces neurobiochemical changes that increased sensitivity to cocaine when fat is withdrawn, acting as an alternative reward.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cocaína/farmacologia
Dieta Hiperlipídica/psicologia
Dieta Hiperlipídica/tendências
Receptor CB1 de Canabinoide/biossíntese
Receptor CB1 de Canabinoide/genética
Recompensa
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Condicionamento Clássico/efeitos dos fármacos
Condicionamento Clássico/fisiologia
Expressão Gênica
Masculino
Camundongos
Núcleo Accumbens/efeitos dos fármacos
Núcleo Accumbens/metabolismo
Córtex Pré-Frontal/efeitos dos fármacos
Córtex Pré-Frontal/metabolismo
Receptores de Grelina/metabolismo
Receptores Opioides mu/metabolismo
Reforço (Psicologia)
Área Tegmentar Ventral/efeitos dos fármacos
Área Tegmentar Ventral/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1); 0 (Receptors, Ghrelin); 0 (Receptors, Opioid, mu); I5Y540LHVR (Cocaine)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180306
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180306
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170501
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00213-017-4630-9


  5 / 16228 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28452692
[Au] Autor:An R; Sturm R
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA.
[Ti] Título:A Cash-back Rebate Program for Healthy Food Purchases in South Africa: Selection and Program Effects in Self-reported Diet Patterns.
[So] Source:Am J Health Behav;41(2):152-162, 2017 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7359
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: A South African insurer launched a rebate program for healthy food purchases for its members, but only available in program-designated supermarkets. To eliminate selection bias in program enrollment, we estimated the impact of subsidies in nudging the population towards a healthier diet using an instrumental variable approach. METHODS: Data came from a health behavior questionnaire administered among members in the health promotion program. Individual and supermarket addresses were geocoded and differential distances from home to program-designated supermarkets versus competing supermarkets were calculated. Bivariate probit and linear instrumental variable models were performed to control for likely unobserved selection biases, employing differential distances as a predictor of program enrollment. RESULTS: For regular fast-food, processed meat, and salty food consumption, approximately two-thirds of the difference between participants and nonparticipants was attributable to the intervention and one-third to selection effects. For fruit/ vegetable and fried food consumption, merely one-eighth of the difference was selection. The rebate reduced regular consumption of fast food by 15% and foods high in salt/sugar and fried foods by 22%- 26%, and increased fruit/vegetable consumption by 21% (0.66 serving/day). CONCLUSIONS: Large population interventions are an essential complement to laboratory experiments, but selection biases require explicit attention in evaluation studies conducted in naturalistic settings.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde
Promoção da Saúde/métodos
Dieta Saudável
Seguro Saúde
Motivação
Recompensa
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Seleção Tendenciosa de Seguro
Masculino
Meia-Idade
África do Sul
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180306
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180306
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5993/AJHB.41.2.6


  6 / 16228 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29362449
[Au] Autor:Korn CW; Bach DR
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Clinical Psychiatry Research, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics; Psychiatric Hospital, University of Zurich, Lengstrasse 31, 8032, Zurich, Switzerland. c.korn@uke.de.
[Ti] Título:Heuristic and optimal policy computations in the human brain during sequential decision-making.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):325, 2018 01 23.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Optimal decisions across extended time horizons require value calculations over multiple probabilistic future states. Humans may circumvent such complex computations by resorting to easy-to-compute heuristics that approximate optimal solutions. To probe the potential interplay between heuristic and optimal computations, we develop a novel sequential decision-making task, framed as virtual foraging in which participants have to avoid virtual starvation. Rewards depend only on final outcomes over five-trial blocks, necessitating planning over five sequential decisions and probabilistic outcomes. Here, we report model comparisons demonstrating that participants primarily rely on the best available heuristic but also use the normatively optimal policy. FMRI signals in medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) relate to heuristic and optimal policies and associated choice uncertainties. Crucially, reaction times and dorsal MPFC activity scale with discrepancies between heuristic and optimal policies. Thus, sequential decision-making in humans may emerge from integration between heuristic and optimal policies, implemented by controllers in MPFC.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Encéfalo/fisiologia
Comportamento de Escolha/fisiologia
Tomada de Decisões/fisiologia
Heurística/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Mapeamento Encefálico
Comportamento Alimentar/fisiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Imagem por Ressonância Magnética
Masculino
Estimulação Luminosa
Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia
Tempo de Reação/fisiologia
Recompensa
Incerteza
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-02750-3


  7 / 16228 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29365346
[Au] Autor:Hodder RK; Stacey FG; O'Brien KM; Wyse RJ; Clinton-McHarg T; Tzelepis F; James EL; Bartlem KM; Nathan NK; Sutherland R; Robson E; Yoong SL; Wolfenden L
[Ad] Endereço:Hunter New England Population Health, Hunter New England Local Health District, Locked Bag 10, Wallsend, Australia, 2287.
[Ti] Título:Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;1:CD008552, 2018 01 25.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Insufficient consumption of fruits and vegetables in childhood increases the risk of future chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness, cost effectiveness and associated adverse events of interventions designed to increase the consumption of fruit, vegetables or both amongst children aged five years and under. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and Embase to identify eligible trials on 25 September 2017. We searched Proquest Dissertations and Theses and two clinical trial registers in November 2017. We reviewed reference lists of included trials and handsearched three international nutrition journals. We contacted authors of included studies to identify further potentially relevant trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials, including cluster-randomised controlled trials and cross-over trials, of any intervention primarily targeting consumption of fruit, vegetables or both among children aged five years and under, and incorporating a dietary or biochemical assessment of fruit or vegetable consumption. Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts of identified papers; a third review author resolved disagreements. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risks of bias of included studies; a third review author resolved disagreements. Due to unexplained heterogeneity, we used random-effects models in meta-analyses for the primary review outcomes where we identified sufficient trials. We calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs) to account for the heterogeneity of fruit and vegetable consumption measures. We conducted assessments of risks of bias and evaluated the quality of evidence (GRADE approach) using Cochrane procedures. MAIN RESULTS: We included 55 trials with 154 trial arms and 11,108 participants. Thirty-three trials examined the impact of child-feeding practices (e.g. repeated food exposure) in increasing child vegetable intake. Thirteen trials examined the impact of parent nutrition education in increasing child fruit and vegetable intake. Eight studies examined the impact of multicomponent interventions (e.g. parent nutrition education and preschool policy changes) in increasing child fruit and vegetable intake. One study examined the effect of a nutrition intervention delivered to children in increasing child fruit and vegetable intake.We judged 14 of the 55 included trials as free from high risks of bias across all domains; performance, detection and attrition bias were the most common domains judged at high risk of bias for the remaining studies.Meta-analysis of trials examining child-feeding practices versus no intervention revealed a positive effect on child vegetable consumption (SMD 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.15 to 0.61; n = 1509; 11 studies; very low-quality evidence), equivalent to a mean difference of 4.03 g of vegetables. There were no short-term differences in child consumption of fruit and vegetables in meta-analyses of trials examining parent nutrition education versus no intervention (SMD 0.11, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.28; n = 3023; 10 studies; very low-quality evidence) or multicomponent interventions versus no intervention (SMD 0.28, 95% CI -0.06 to 0.63; n = 1861; 4 studies; very low-quality evidence).Insufficient data were available to assess long-term effectiveness, cost effectiveness and unintended adverse consequences of interventions. Studies reported receiving governmental or charitable funds, except for three studies reporting industry funding. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Despite identifying 55 eligible trials of various intervention approaches, the evidence for how to increase children's fruit and vegetable consumption remains sparse. There was very low-quality evidence that child-feeding practice interventions are effective in increasing vegetable consumption in children aged five years and younger, however the effect size was very small and long-term follow-up is required. There was very low-quality evidence that parent nutrition education and multicomponent interventions are not effective in increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and younger. All findings should be considered with caution, given most included trials could not be combined in meta-analyses. Given the very low-quality evidence, future research will very likely change estimates and conclusions. Such research should adopt more rigorous methods to advance the field.This is a living systematic review. Living systematic reviews offer a new approach to review updating, in which the review is continually updated, incorporating relevant new evidence as it becomes available. Please refer to the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for the current status of this review.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ingestão de Alimentos
Comportamento Alimentar
Frutas
Verduras
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Pré-Escolar
Condicionamento (Psicologia)
Visita Domiciliar
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
Recompensa
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180301
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180301
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub4


  8 / 16228 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28743727
[Au] Autor:Lichtenberg NT; Pennington ZT; Holley SM; Greenfield VY; Cepeda C; Levine MS; Wassum KM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology and.
[Ti] Título:Basolateral Amygdala to Orbitofrontal Cortex Projections Enable Cue-Triggered Reward Expectations.
[So] Source:J Neurosci;37(35):8374-8384, 2017 Aug 30.
[Is] ISSN:1529-2401
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:To make an appropriate decision, one must anticipate potential future rewarding events, even when they are not readily observable. These expectations are generated by using observable information (e.g., stimuli or available actions) to retrieve often quite detailed memories of available rewards. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) are two reciprocally connected key nodes in the circuitry supporting such outcome-guided behaviors. But there is much unknown about the contribution of this circuit to decision making, and almost nothing known about the whether any contribution is via direct, monosynaptic projections, or the direction of information transfer. Therefore, here we used designer receptor-mediated inactivation of OFC→BLA or BLA→OFC projections to evaluate their respective contributions to outcome-guided behaviors in rats. Inactivation of BLA terminals in the OFC, but not OFC terminals in the BLA, disrupted the selective motivating influence of cue-triggered reward representations over reward-seeking decisions as assayed by Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer. BLA→OFC projections were also required when a cued reward representation was used to modify Pavlovian conditional goal-approach responses according to the reward's current value. These projections were not necessary when actions were guided by reward expectations generated based on learned action-reward contingencies, or when rewards themselves, rather than stored memories, directed action. These data demonstrate that BLA→OFC projections enable the cue-triggered reward expectations that can motivate the execution of specific action plans and allow adaptive conditional responding. Deficits anticipating potential future rewarding events are associated with many psychiatric diseases. Presently, we know little about the neural circuits supporting such reward expectation. Here we show that basolateral amygdala to orbitofrontal cortex projections are required for expectations of specific available rewards to influence reward seeking and decision making. The necessity of these projections was limited to situations in which expectations were elicited by reward-predictive cues. These projections therefore facilitate adaptive behavior by enabling the orbitofrontal cortex to use environmental stimuli to generate expectations of potential future rewarding events.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Antecipação Psicológica/fisiologia
Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala/fisiologia
Tomada de Decisões/fisiologia
Extinção Psicológica/fisiologia
Motivação/fisiologia
Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia
Recompensa
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Condicionamento Operante/fisiologia
Sinais (Psicologia)
Masculino
Vias Neurais/fisiologia
Ratos
Ratos Long-Evans
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170727
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0486-17.2017


  9 / 16228 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29374173
[Au] Autor:Shin JH; Kim D; Jung MW
[Ad] Endereço:Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 34141, Korea.
[Ti] Título:Differential coding of reward and movement information in the dorsomedial striatal direct and indirect pathways.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):404, 2018 01 26.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The direct and indirect pathways of the basal ganglia have long been thought to mediate behavioral promotion and inhibition, respectively. However, this classic dichotomous model has been recently challenged. To better understand neural processes underlying reward-based learning and movement control, we recorded from direct (dSPNs) and indirect (iSPNs) pathway spiny projection neurons in the dorsomedial striatum of D1-Cre and D2-Cre mice performing a probabilistic Pavlovian conditioning task. dSPNs tend to increase activity while iSPNs decrease activity as a function of reward value, suggesting the striatum represents value in the relative activity levels of dSPNs versus iSPNs. Lick offset-related activity increase is largely dSPN selective, suggesting dSPN involvement in suppressing ongoing licking behavior. Rapid responses to negative outcome and previous reward-related responses are more frequent among iSPNs than dSPNs, suggesting stronger contributions of iSPNs to outcome-dependent behavioral adjustment. These findings provide new insights into striatal neural circuit operations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Condicionamento (Psicologia)/fisiologia
Corpo Estriado/fisiologia
Vias Neurais/fisiologia
Neurônios/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Corpo Estriado/citologia
Sinais (Psicologia)
Eletrodos Implantados
Masculino
Camundongos
Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL
Camundongos Transgênicos
Monoterpenos
Movimento
Odorantes/análise
Percepção Olfatória/fisiologia
Optogenética
Pentanóis
Receptores de Dopamina D1/fisiologia
Receptores de Dopamina D2/fisiologia
Recompensa
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Monoterpenes); 0 (Pentanols); 0 (Receptors, Dopamine D1); 0 (Receptors, Dopamine D2); 75GK9XIA8I (carvone); T7EU0O9VPP (citral); Z135787824 (isoamyl acetate)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180128
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-02817-1


  10 / 16228 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28451642
[Au] Autor:Moschak TM; Carelli RM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599.
[Ti] Título:Impulsive Rats Exhibit Blunted Dopamine Release Dynamics during a Delay Discounting Task Independent of Cocaine History.
[So] Source:eNeuro;4(2), 2017 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:2373-2822
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The inability to wait for a large, delayed reward when faced with a small, immediate one, known as delay discounting, has been implicated in a number of disorders including substance abuse. Individual differences in impulsivity on the delay discounting task are reflected in differences in neural function, including in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core. We examined the role of a history of cocaine self-administration, as well as individual differences in impulsivity, on rapid dopamine (DA) release dynamics in the NAc core. Rats with a history of cocaine or water/saline self-administration were tested on delay discounting while being simultaneously assayed for rapid DA release using electrochemical methods. In controls, we found that cue DA release was modulated by reward delay and magnitude, consistent with prior reports. A history of cocaine had no effect on either delay discounting or DA release dynamics. Nonetheless, independent of drug history, individual differences in impulsivity were related to DA release in the NAc core. First, high impulsive animals exhibited dampened cue DA release during the delay discounting task. Second, reward delay and magnitude in high impulsive animals failed to robustly modulate changes in cue DA release. Importantly, these two DAergic mechanisms were uncorrelated with each other and, together, accounted for a high degree of variance in impulsive behavior. Collectively, these findings demonstrate two distinct mechanisms by which rapid DA signaling may influence impulsivity, and illustrate the importance of NAc core DA release dynamics in impulsive behavior.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cocaína/administração & dosagem
Desvalorização pelo Atraso/efeitos dos fármacos
Dopamina/metabolismo
Comportamento Impulsivo
Núcleo Accumbens/efeitos dos fármacos
Núcleo Accumbens/metabolismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Condicionamento Operante
Masculino
Ratos Long-Evans
Recompensa
Autoadministração
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Nm] Nome de substância:
I5Y540LHVR (Cocaine); VTD58H1Z2X (Dopamine)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180228
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180228
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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