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[PMID]:28459273
[Au] Autor:Wass SV; Cook C; Clackson K
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, University of East London.
[Ti] Título:Changes in behavior and salivary cortisol after targeted cognitive training in typical 12-month-old infants.
[So] Source:Dev Psychol;53(5):815-825, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1939-0599
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Previous research has suggested that early development may be an optimal period to implement cognitive training interventions, particularly those relating to attention control, a basic ability that is essential for the development of other cognitive skills. In the present study, we administered gaze-contingent training (95 min across 2 weeks) targeted at voluntary attention control to a cohort of typical 12-month-old children (N = 24) and sham training to a control group (N = 24). We assessed training effects on (a) tasks involving nontrained aspects of attention control: visual sustained attention, habituation speed, visual recognition memory, sequence learning, and reversal learning; (b) general attentiveness (on-task behaviors during testing); and (c) salivary cortisol levels. Assessments were administered immediately after the cessation of training and at a 6-week follow-up. On the immediate posttest infants showed significantly more sustained visual attention, faster habituation, and improved sequence learning. Significant effects were also found for increased general attentiveness and decreased salivary cortisol. Some of these effects were still evident at the 6-week follow-up (significantly improved sequence learning and marginally improved sustained attention). These findings extend the emerging literature showing that attention training is possible in infancy. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atenção/fisiologia
Hidrocortisona/metabolismo
Comportamento do Lactente/fisiologia
Aprendizagem/fisiologia
Reconhecimento Visual de Modelos/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Assistência ao Convalescente
Feminino
Habituação Psicofisiológica/fisiologia
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Masculino
Recognição (Psicologia)/fisiologia
Reversão de Aprendizagem/fisiologia
Saliva/metabolismo
Aprendizagem Seriada/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
WI4X0X7BPJ (Hydrocortisone)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180222
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180222
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/dev0000266


  2 / 2960 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28459262
[Au] Autor:Ginsburg V; Archambeau K; van Dijck JP; Chetail F; Gevers W
[Ad] Endereço:Center for Research in Cognition and Neurosciences, Université Libre de Bruxelles.
[Ti] Título:Coding of serial order in verbal, visual and spatial working memory.
[So] Source:J Exp Psychol Gen;146(5):632-650, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1939-2222
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In the domain of working memory, recent theories postulate that the maintenance of serial order is driven by position marking. According to this idea, serial order is maintained though associations of each item with an independent representation of the position that the item constitutes in the sequence. Recent studies suggest that those position markers are spatial in nature, with the beginning items associated with left side and the end elements with the right side of space (i.e., the ordinal position effect). So far however, it is unclear whether serial order is coded along the same principles in the verbal and the visuospatial domain. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether serial order is coded in a domain general fashion or not. To unravel this question, 6 experiments were conducted. The first 3 experiments revealed that the ordinal position effect is found with verbal but not with spatial information. In the subsequent experiments, the authors isolated the origin of this dissociation and conclude that to obtain spatial coding of serial order, it is not the nature of the encoded information (verbal, visual, or spatial) that is crucial, but whether the memoranda are semantically processed or not. This work supports the idea that serial order is coded in a domain general fashion, but suggests that position markers are only spatially coded when the to-be-remembered information is processed at the semantic level. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Memória de Curto Prazo/fisiologia
Aprendizagem Seriada/fisiologia
Memória Espacial/fisiologia
Aprendizagem Verbal/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Testes Neuropsicológicos
Tempo de Reação/fisiologia
Semântica
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180112
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180112
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/xge0000278


  3 / 2960 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28383991
[Au] Autor:Török B; Janacsek K; Nagy DG; Orbán G; Nemeth D
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Cognitive Science, Budapest University of Technology and Economics.
[Ti] Título:Measuring and filtering reactive inhibition is essential for assessing serial decision making and learning.
[So] Source:J Exp Psychol Gen;146(4):529-542, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1939-2222
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Learning complex structures from stimuli requires extended exposure and often repeated observation of the same stimuli. Learning induces stimulus-dependent changes in specific performance measures. The same performance measures, however, can also be affected by processes that arise because of extended training (e.g., fatigue) but are otherwise independent from learning. Thus, a thorough assessment of the properties of learning can only be achieved by identifying and accounting for the effects of such processes. Reactive inhibition is a process that modulates behavioral performance measures on a wide range of time scales and often has opposite effects than learning. Here we develop a tool to disentangle the effects of reactive inhibition from learning in the context of an implicit learning task, the alternating serial reaction time (ASRT) task. Our method highlights that the magnitude of the effect of reactive inhibition on measured performance is larger than that of the acquisition of statistical structure from stimuli. We show that the effect of reactive inhibition can be identified not only in population measures but also at the level of performance of individuals, revealing varying degrees of contribution of reactive inhibition. Finally, we demonstrate that a higher proportion of behavioral variance can be explained by learning once the effects of reactive inhibition are eliminated. These results demonstrate that reactive inhibition has a fundamental effect on the behavioral performance that can be identified in individual participants and can be separated from other cognitive processes like learning. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Tomada de Decisões
Reconhecimento Visual de Modelos
Inibição Reativa
Aprendizagem Seriada
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Individualidade
Masculino
Modelos Estatísticos
Desempenho Psicomotor
Tempo de Reação
Aprendizagem Seriada/fisiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171023
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171023
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170407
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/xge0000288


  4 / 2960 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28383990
[Au] Autor:Zuk J; Bishop-Liebler P; Ozernov-Palchik O; Moore E; Overy K; Welch G; Gaab N
[Ad] Endereço:Developmental Medicine Center, Laboratories of Cognitive Neuroscience, Boston Children's Hospital.
[Ti] Título:Revisiting the "enigma" of musicians with dyslexia: Auditory sequencing and speech abilities.
[So] Source:J Exp Psychol Gen;146(4):495-511, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1939-2222
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Previous research has suggested a link between musical training and auditory processing skills. Musicians have shown enhanced perception of auditory features critical to both music and speech, suggesting that this link extends beyond basic auditory processing. It remains unclear to what extent musicians who also have dyslexia show these specialized abilities, considering often-observed persistent deficits that coincide with reading impairments. The present study evaluated auditory sequencing and speech discrimination in 52 adults comprised of musicians with dyslexia, nonmusicians with dyslexia, and typical musicians. An auditory sequencing task measuring perceptual acuity for tone sequences of increasing length was administered. Furthermore, subjects were asked to discriminate synthesized syllable continua varying in acoustic components of speech necessary for intraphonemic discrimination, which included spectral (formant frequency) and temporal (voice onset time [VOT] and amplitude envelope) features. Results indicate that musicians with dyslexia did not significantly differ from typical musicians and performed better than nonmusicians with dyslexia for auditory sequencing as well as discrimination of spectral and VOT cues within syllable continua. However, typical musicians demonstrated superior performance relative to both groups with dyslexia for discrimination of syllables varying in amplitude information. These findings suggest a distinct profile of speech processing abilities in musicians with dyslexia, with specific weaknesses in discerning amplitude cues within speech. Because these difficulties seem to remain persistent in adults with dyslexia despite musical training, this study only partly supports the potential for musical training to enhance the auditory processing skills known to be crucial for literacy in individuals with dyslexia. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Percepção Auditiva
Dislexia/diagnóstico
Dislexia/psicologia
Música
Aprendizagem Seriada
Percepção da Fala
Fala
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Sinais (Psicologia)
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Fonética
Nível de Discriminação Sonora
Espectrografia do Som
Percepção do Tempo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171023
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171023
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170407
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/xge0000281


  5 / 2960 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28251336
[Au] Autor:Martin L; Tapper A; Gonzalez DA; Leclerc M; Niechwiej-Szwedo E
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, M5G 1X8, Canada.
[Ti] Título:The effects of task-relevant saccadic eye movements performed during the encoding of a serial sequence on visuospatial memory performance.
[So] Source:Exp Brain Res;235(5):1519-1529, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1106
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Visuospatial working memory (VSWM) is a set of cognitive processes used to encode, maintain and manipulate spatial information. One important feature of VSWM is that it has a limited capacity such that only few items can be actively stored and manipulated simultaneously. Given the limited capacity, it is important to determine the conditions that affect memory performance as this will improve our understanding of the architecture and function of VSWM. Previous studies have shown that VSWM is disrupted when task-irrelevant eye movements are performed during the maintenance phase; however, relatively fewer studies examined the role of eye movements performed during the encoding phase. On one hand, performing eye movements during the encoding phase could result in a stronger memory trace because the memory formation is reinforced by the activation of the motor system. On the other hand, performing eye movements to each target could disrupt the configural processing of the spatial array because the spatial representation has to be updated with each movement to maintain perceptual stability. Therefore, this work was conducted to examine whether task-relevant saccadic eye movements performed during the encoding phase of a visuospatial working memory task affect the recall of serially presented targets. Results from two experiments showed that average recall accuracy was significantly higher when the spatial array (set size ≥ 7) was encoded using a covert strategy-that is, while participants fixated on a central target, in comparison to an overt strategy-that is, while participants moved their eyes to fixate on each target. Furthermore, the improvement in accuracy was evident only for targets presented in the first half of the sequence, suggesting that the primacy effect is modulated by the presence of eye movements. We propose that executing saccades during encoding could interfere with the ability to use a chunking strategy or disrupt active visualization of the configuration. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that task-relevant saccadic eye movements performed during encoding may actually reduce the spatial span of VSWM. These results extend the current knowledge about the role of eye movements in VSWM, and have implications for future studies investigating the VSWM.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Memória de Curto Prazo/fisiologia
Movimentos Sacádicos/fisiologia
Aprendizagem Seriada/fisiologia
Percepção Espacial/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Análise de Variância
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Rememoração Mental/fisiologia
Testes Neuropsicológicos
Estimulação Luminosa
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170922
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170922
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170303
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00221-017-4915-6


  6 / 2960 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27856107
[Au] Autor:Henderson LM; Warmington M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, University of York, United Kingdom. Electronic address: lisa-marie.henderson@york.ac.uk.
[Ti] Título:A sequence learning impairment in dyslexia? It depends on the task.
[So] Source:Res Dev Disabil;60:198-210, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3379
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Language acquisition is argued to be dependent upon an individuals' sensitivity to serial-order regularities in the environment (sequential learning), and impairments in reading and spelling in dyslexia have recently been attributed to a deficit in sequential learning. The present study examined the learning and consolidation of sequential knowledge in 30 adults with dyslexia and 29 typical adults matched on age and nonverbal ability using two tasks previously reported to be sensitive to a sequence learning deficit. Both groups showed evidence of sequential learning and consolidation on a serial response time (SRT) task (i.e., faster and more accurate responses to sequenced spatial locations than randomly ordered spatial locations during training that persisted one week later). Whilst typical adults showed evidence of sequential learning on a Hebb repetition task (i.e., more accurate serial recall of repetitive sequences of nonwords versus randomly ordered sequences), adults with dyslexia showed initial advantages for repetitive versus randomly ordered sequences in the first half of training trials, but this effect disappeared in the second half of trials. This Hebb repetition effect was positively correlated with spelling in the dyslexic group; however, there was no correlation between sequential learning on the two tasks, placing doubt over whether sequential learning in different modalities represents a single capacity. These data suggest that sequential learning difficulties in adults with dyslexia are not ubiquitous, and when present may be a consequence of task demands rather than sequence learning per se.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dislexia/fisiopatologia
Aprendizagem Seriada/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Estudos de Casos e Controles
Dislexia/psicologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Memória/fisiologia
Rememoração Mental/fisiologia
Tempo de Reação
Análise e Desempenho de Tarefas
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170608
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170608
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161119
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 2960 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27832611
[Au] Autor:Stark-Inbar A; Raza M; Taylor JA; Ivry RB
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, California; alit.stark@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Individual differences in implicit motor learning: task specificity in sensorimotor adaptation and sequence learning.
[So] Source:J Neurophysiol;117(1):412-428, 2017 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1522-1598
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In standard taxonomies, motor skills are typically treated as representative of implicit or procedural memory. We examined two emblematic tasks of implicit motor learning, sensorimotor adaptation and sequence learning, asking whether individual differences in learning are correlated between these tasks, as well as how individual differences within each task are related to different performance variables. As a prerequisite, it was essential to establish the reliability of learning measures for each task. Participants were tested twice on a visuomotor adaptation task and on a sequence learning task, either the serial reaction time task or the alternating reaction time task. Learning was evident in all tasks at the group level and reliable at the individual level in visuomotor adaptation and the alternating reaction time task but not in the serial reaction time task. Performance variability was predictive of learning in both domains, yet the relationship was in the opposite direction for adaptation and sequence learning. For the former, faster learning was associated with lower variability, consistent with models of sensorimotor adaptation in which learning rates are sensitive to noise. For the latter, greater learning was associated with higher variability and slower reaction times, factors that may facilitate the spread of activation required to form predictive, sequential associations. Interestingly, learning measures of the different tasks were not correlated. Together, these results oppose a shared process for implicit learning in sensorimotor adaptation and sequence learning and provide insight into the factors that account for individual differences in learning within each task domain. NEW & NOTEWORTHY: We investigated individual differences in the ability to implicitly learn motor skills. As a prerequisite, we assessed whether individual differences were reliable across test sessions. We found that two commonly used tasks of implicit learning, visuomotor adaptation and the alternating serial reaction time task, exhibited good test-retest reliability in measures of learning and performance. However, the learning measures did not correlate between the two tasks, arguing against a shared process for implicit motor learning.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Adaptação Fisiológica/fisiologia
Individualidade
Destreza Motora/fisiologia
Movimento/fisiologia
Aprendizagem Seriada/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Estimulação Luminosa
Tempo de Reação/fisiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170920
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170920
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161111
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1152/jn.01141.2015


  8 / 2960 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27643509
[Au] Autor:Clark GM; Lum JA
[Ad] Endereço:Cognitive Neuroscience Unit.
[Ti] Título:First-order and higher order sequence learning in specific language impairment.
[So] Source:Neuropsychology;31(2):149-159, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1931-1559
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: A core claim of the procedural deficit hypothesis of specific language impairment (SLI) is that the disorder is associated with poor implicit sequence learning. This study investigated whether implicit sequence learning problems in SLI are present for first-order conditional (FOC) and higher order conditional (HOC) sequences. METHOD: Twenty-five children with SLI and 27 age-matched, nonlanguage-impaired children completed 2 serial reaction time tasks. On 1 version, the sequence to be implicitly learnt comprised a FOC sequence and on the other a HOC sequence. RESULTS: Results showed that the SLI group learned the HOC sequence (η ² = .285, p = .005) but not the FOC sequence (η ² = .099, p = .118). The control group learned both sequences (FOC η ² = .497, HOC η 2= .465, ps < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The SLI group's difficulty learning the FOC sequence is consistent with the procedural deficit hypothesis. However, the study provides new evidence that multiple mechanisms may underpin the learning of FOC and HOC sequences. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/diagnóstico
Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/psicologia
Aprendizagem Seriada
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Atenção
Criança
Percepção de Cores
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/classificação
Transtornos da Linguagem
Testes de Linguagem
Masculino
Orientação
Reconhecimento Visual de Modelos
Tempo de Reação
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; WEBCASTS
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170817
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170817
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160920
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/neu0000316


  9 / 2960 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27618880
[Au] Autor:Witt A; Vinter A
[Ad] Endereço:a LEAD-CNRS , University of Bourgogne Franche-Comté , Dijon , France.
[Ti] Título:Perceptual and positional saliencies influence children's sequence learning differently with age and instructions at test.
[So] Source:Q J Exp Psychol (Hove);70(11):2219-2233, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1747-0226
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:There is growing evidence that, faced with a complex environment, participants subdivide the incoming information into small perceptual units, called chunks. Although statistical properties have been identified as playing a key role in chunking, we wanted to determine whether perceptual (repetitions) and positional (initial units) features might provide immediate guidance for the parsing of information into chunks. Children aged 5 and 8 years were exposed to sequences of 3, 4, or 5 colours. Sequence learning was assessed either through an explicit generation test (Experiment 1) or through a recognition test (Experiment 2). Experiment 1 showed that perceptual and positional saliencies benefited learning and that sensitivity to repetitions was age dependent and permitted the formation of longer chunks (trigrams) in the oldest children. Experiment 2 suggested that children became sensitive to perceptual and positional saliencies regardless of age and that the both types of saliencies supported the formation of longer chunks in the oldest children. The discussion focuses on the multiple factors intervening in sequence learning and their differential effects as a function of the instructions used at test to assess sequence learning.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Envelhecimento/fisiologia
Condicionamento Operante/fisiologia
Desempenho Psicomotor/fisiologia
Aprendizagem Seriada/fisiologia
Percepção Espacial/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Análise de Variância
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Sensibilidade e Especificidade
Jogos de Vídeo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170424
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170424
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160914
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/17470218.2016.1230141


  10 / 2960 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27618817
[Au] Autor:Greeley B; Seidler RD
[Ad] Endereço:School of Kinesiology, University of Michigan, 401 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI, 48108, USA. bkgreeley@umich.edu.
[Ti] Título:Mood induction effects on motor sequence learning and stop signal reaction time.
[So] Source:Exp Brain Res;235(1):41-56, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1106
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The neurobiological theory of positive affect proposes that positive mood states may benefit cognitive performance due to an increase of dopamine throughout the brain. However, the results of many positive affect studies are inconsistent; this may be due to individual differences. The relationship between dopamine and performance is not linear, but instead follows an inverted "U" shape. Given this, we hypothesized that individuals with high working memory capacity, a proxy measure for dopaminergic transmission, would not benefit from positive mood induction and in fact performance in dopamine-mediated tasks would decline. In contrast, we predicted that individuals with low working memory capacities would receive the most benefit after positive mood induction. Here, we explored the effect of positive affect on two dopamine-mediated tasks, an explicit serial reaction time sequence learning task and the stop signal task, predicting that an individual's performance is modulated not only by working memory capacity, but also on the type of mood. Improvements in explicit sequence learning from pre- to post-positive mood induction were associated with working memory capacity; performance declined in individuals with higher working memory capacities following positive mood induction, but improved in individuals with lower working memory capacities. This was not the case for negative or neutral mood induction. Moreover, there was no relationship between the change in stop signal reaction time with any of the mood inductions and individual differences in working memory capacity. These results provide partial support for the neurobiological theory of positive affect and highlight the importance of taking into account individual differences in working memory when examining the effects of positive mood induction.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Afeto/fisiologia
Inibição (Psicologia)
Tempo de Reação/fisiologia
Aprendizagem Seriada/fisiologia
Detecção de Sinal Psicológico/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Análise de Variância
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Modelos Lineares
Masculino
Testes Neuropsicológicos
Leitura
Fatores de Tempo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170922
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170922
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160914
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00221-016-4764-8



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