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  1 / 2036 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29304135
[Au] Autor:Horváth G; Nemes VA; Radó J; Czigler A; Török B; Buzás P; Jandó G
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Physiology, University of Pécs Medical School, Pécs, Hungary.
[Ti] Título:Simple reaction times to cyclopean stimuli reveal that the binocular system is tuned to react faster to near than to far objects.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0188895, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Binocular depth perception is an important mechanism to segregate the visual scene for mapping relevant objects in our environment. Convergent evidence from psychophysical and neurophysiological studies have revealed asymmetries between the processing of near (crossed) and far (uncrossed) binocular disparities. The aim of the present study was to test if near or far objects are processed faster and with higher contrast sensitivity in the visual system. We therefore measured the relationship between binocular disparity and simple reaction time (RT) as well as contrast gain based on the contrast-RT function in young healthy adults. RTs were measured to suddenly appearing cyclopean target stimuli, which were checkerboard patterns encoded by depth in dynamic random dot stereograms (DRDS). The DRDS technique allowed us to selectively study the stereoscopic processing system by eliminating all monocular cues. The results showed that disparity and contrast had significant effects on RTs. RTs as a function of disparity followed a U-shaped tuning curve indicating an optimum at around 15 arc min, where RTs were minimal. Surprisingly, the disparity tuning of RT was much less pronounced for far disparities. At the optimal disparity, we measured advantages of about 80 ms and 30 ms for near disparities at low (10%) and high (90%) contrasts, respectively. High contrast always reduced RTs as well as the disparity dependent differences. Furthermore, RT-based contrast gains were higher for near disparities in the range of disparities where RTs were the shortest. These results show that the sensitivity of the human visual system is biased for near versus far disparities and near stimuli can result in faster motor responses, probably because they bear higher biological relevance.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Tempo de Reação/fisiologia
Visão Binocular/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Sensibilidades de Contraste/fisiologia
Percepção de Profundidade/fisiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Estimulação Luminosa
Psicofísica
Disparidade Visual/fisiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180210
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180210
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180106
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188895


  2 / 2036 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29196763
[Au] Autor:Caziot B; Backus BT; Lin E
[Ad] Endereço:Graduate Center for Vision Research, SUNY College of Optometry, New York, NY, USA.
[Ti] Título:Early dynamics of stereoscopic surface slant perception.
[So] Source:J Vis;17(14):4, 2017 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:1534-7362
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Surface orientation is an important visual primitive that can be estimated from monocular or binocular (stereoscopic) signals. Changes in motor planning occur within about 200 ms after either type of signal is perturbed, but the time it takes for apparent (perceived) slant to develop from stereoscopic cues is not known. Apparent slant sometimes develops very slowly (Gillam, Chambers, & Russo, 1988; van Ee & Erkelens, 1996). However, these long durations could reflect the time it takes for the visual system to resolve conflicts between slant cues that inevitably specify different slants in laboratory displays (Allison & Howard, 2000). We used a speed-accuracy tradeoff analysis to measure the time it takes to discriminate slant, allowing us to report psychometric functions as a function of response time. Observers reported which side of a slanted surface was farther, with a temporal deadline for responding that varied block-to-block. Stereoscopic slant discrimination rose above chance starting at 200 ms after stimulus onset. Unexpectedly, observers discriminated slant from binocular disparity faster than texture, and for stereoscopic whole-field stimuli faster than stereoscopic slant contrast stimuli. However, performance after the initial deviation from chance increased more rapidly for slant-contrast stimuli than whole-field stimuli. Discrimination latencies were similar for slants about the horizontal and vertical axes, but performance increased faster for slants about the vertical axis. Finally, slant from vertical disparity was somewhat slower than slant from horizontal disparity, which may reflect cue conflict. These results demonstrate, in contradiction with the previous literature, that the perception of slant from disparity happens very quickly-in fact, more quickly than the perception of slant from texture-and in comparable time to the simple perception of brightness from luminance.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Sinais (Psicologia)
Percepção de Profundidade/fisiologia
Orientação Espacial/fisiologia
Disparidade Visual/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Psicometria/métodos
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1167/17.14.4


  3 / 2036 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29228141
[Au] Autor:Zeng H; Kreutzer S; Fink GR; Weidner R
[Ad] Endereço:Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany.
[Ti] Título:The source of visual size adaptation.
[So] Source:J Vis;17(14):8, 2017 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:1534-7362
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Size adaptation describes the tendency of the visual system to adjust neural responsiveness of size representations after prolonged exposure to particular stimulations. A larger (or smaller) adaptor stimulus influences the perceived size of a similar test stimulus shown subsequently. Size adaptation may emerge on various processing levels. Functional representations of the adaptor to which the upcoming stimulus is adapted may be coded early in the visual system mainly reflecting retinal size. Alternatively, size adaptation may involve higher order processes that take into account additional information such as an object's estimated distance from the observer, hence reflecting perceived size. The present study investigated whether size adaptation is based on the retinal or the perceived size of an adaptor stimulus. A stimulus' physical and perceived sizes were orthogonally varied using perceived depth via binocular disparity, employing polarized 3D glasses. Four different adaptors were used, which varied in physical size, perceived size, or both. Two pairs of adaptors which were identical in physical size did not cause significantly different adaptation effects although they elicited different perceived sizes which were sufficiently large to produce differential aftereffects when induced by stimuli that physically differed in size. In contrast, there was a significant aftereffect when adaptors differed in physical size but were matched in perceived size. Size adaptation was thus unaffected by perceived size and binocular disparity. Our data suggest that size adaptation emerges from neural stages where information from both eyes is still coded in separate channels without binocular interactions, such as the lateral geniculate nucleus.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Adaptação Ocular/fisiologia
Percepção de Tamanho/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Percepção de Profundidade/fisiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Estimulação Luminosa
Retina/fisiologia
Disparidade Visual/fisiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171215
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171215
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171212
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1167/17.14.8


  4 / 2036 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27776360
[Au] Autor:Hisakata R; Hayashi D; Murakami I
[Ad] Endereço:School of Human Sciences, Senshu University, Kanagawa, JapanDepartment of Life Sciences, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo JapanJapan Society for the Promotion of Sciencerumi.hisakata@icloud.com.
[Ti] Título:Motion-induced position shift in stereoscopic and dichoptic viewing.
[So] Source:J Vis;16(13):3, 2016 10 01.
[Is] ISSN:1534-7362
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The static envelope of a Gabor patch with a moving sinusoidal carrier appears shifted in the direction of the carrier motion (De Valois & De Valois, 1991). This phenomenon is called motion-induced position shift. Although several motion-processing stages, ranging from low- to high-level processes, may contribute to position estimation, it is unknown whether a binocular matching stage or an even earlier stage exerts an influence. To elucidate this matter, we investigated the disparity tuning of this illusion by manipulating the binocular disparities of the carrier and the envelope. If the mechanisms underlying the illusion have disparity selectivity, the illusory shift should disappear when the carrier and envelope have sufficiently different disparities. We conducted an experiment in which a sinusoidal grating inside a Gaussian envelope had a crossed or uncrossed disparity and the background was filled with static random noise; each subject correctly judged whether the grating was in front of or behind the fixation plane. Position shift occurred even when the moving carrier had a vastly different disparity from that of the envelope, suggesting that one of the mechanisms responsible for the phenomenon exists at a monocular visual stage. To confirm this, in the next experiment we examined whether depth perception can be produced by an illusory disparity due to illusory position shifts in opposite directions between eyes. Two Gabor-like patches moving in opposite directions were presented at the same retinal position dichoptically. We found that when each monocular patch had a soft edge in its contrast envelope, the depth perception of such a patch was biased toward the depth consistent with the illusory crossed or uncrossed disparity, whereas depth perception of a stimulus with a hard edge was less biased. We suggest that the underlying mechanisms of motion-induced position shift are present at an early stage of monocular visual processing, and that the altered positions are represented in the left-eye and right-eye monocular pathways in a way that allows them to function as tokens of binocular matching.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Percepção de Profundidade/fisiologia
Percepção de Movimento/fisiologia
Disparidade Visual/fisiologia
Visão Binocular/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171205
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171205
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1167/16.13.3


  5 / 2036 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28656672
[Au] Autor:Al-Saud LM; Mushtaq F; Mirghani I; Balkhoyor A; Keeling A; Manogue M; Mon-Williams MA
[Ad] Endereço:School of Psychology, Faculty of Medicine & Health, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
[Ti] Título:Drilling into the functional significance of stereopsis: the impact of stereoscopic information on surgical performance.
[So] Source:Ophthalmic Physiol Opt;37(4):498-506, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1475-1313
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PURPOSE: One suggested advantage of human binocular vision is the facilitation of sophisticated motor control behaviours via stereopsis - but little empirical evidence exists to support this suggestion. We examined the functional significance of stereopsis by exploring whether stereopsis is used to perform a highly skilled real-world motor task essential for the occupational practice of dentistry. METHODS: We used a high fidelity virtual reality simulator to study how dentists' performance is affected by the removal of horizontal retinal image disparities under direct and indirect (mirror) observation. Thirteen qualified dentists performed a total of four different dental tasks under non-stereoscopic and stereoscopic vision conditions, with two levels of task complexity (direct and indirect observation) using a virtual reality dental simulator. RESULTS: Depth related errors were significantly higher under non-stereoscopic viewing but lateral errors did not differ between conditions. Indirect observation led to participants drilling less of the target area compared to direct viewing, but this did not interact with the stereopsis manipulation. CONCLUSIONS: The data confirm that dental practitioners use stereopsis and its presence results in improved dental performance. It remains to be determined whether individuals with stereo-deficits can compensate adequately. Nevertheless, these findings suggest an important role for stereopsis within at least one occupation and justify the design of simulators with 3D displays.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Simulação por Computador
Odontólogos
Percepção de Profundidade/fisiologia
Destreza Motora/fisiologia
Análise e Desempenho de Tarefas
Interface Usuário-Computador
Disparidade Visual/fisiologia
Visão Binocular/fisiologia
Acuidade Visual
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170913
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170913
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170629
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/opo.12393


  6 / 2036 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28576937
[Au] Autor:Scholl B; Pattadkal JJ; Priebe NJ
[Ad] Endereço:Max Planck Florida Institute, Jupiter, Florida 33458, and.
[Ti] Título:Binocular Disparity Selectivity Weakened after Monocular Deprivation in Mouse V1.
[So] Source:J Neurosci;37(27):6517-6526, 2017 Jul 05.
[Is] ISSN:1529-2401
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Experiences during the critical period sculpt the circuitry within the neocortex, leading to changes in the functional responses of sensory neurons. Monocular deprivation (MD) during the visual critical period causes shifts in ocular preference, or dominance, toward the open eye in primary visual cortex (V1) and disrupts the normal development of acuity. In carnivores and primates, MD also disrupts the emergence of binocular disparity selectivity, a cue resulting from integrating ocular inputs. This disruption may be a result of the increase in neurons driven exclusively by the open eye that follows deprivation or a result of a mismatch in the convergence of ocular inputs. To distinguish between these possibilities, we measured the ocular dominance (OD) and disparity selectivity of neurons from male and female mouse V1 following MD. Normal mouse V1 neurons are dominated by contralateral eye input and contralateral eye deprivation shifts mouse V1 neurons toward more balanced responses between the eyes. This shift toward binocularity, as assayed by OD, decreased disparity sensitivity. MD did not alter the initial maturation of binocularity, as disparity selectivity before the MD was indistinguishable from normal mature animals. Decreased disparity tuning was most pronounced in binocular and ipsilaterally biased neurons, which are the populations that have undergone the largest shifts in OD. In concert with the decline in disparity selectivity, we observed a shift toward lower spatial frequency selectivity for the ipsilateral eye following MD. These results suggest an emergence of novel synaptic inputs during MD that disrupt the representation of disparity selectivity. We demonstrate that monocular deprivation during the developmental critical period impairs binocular integration in mouse primary visual cortex. This impairment occurs despite an increase in the degree to which neurons become more binocular. We further demonstrate that our deprivation did not impair the maturation of disparity selectivity. Disparity selectivity has already reached a matured level before the monocular deprivation. The loss of disparity tuning is primarily observed in neurons dominated by the open eye, suggesting a link between altered inputs and loss of disparity sensitivity. These results suggest that new inputs following deprivation may not maintain the precise spatial relationship between the two eye inputs required for disparity selectivity.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Rede Nervosa/fisiologia
Privação Sensorial/fisiologia
Disparidade Visual/fisiologia
Visão Binocular/fisiologia
Visão Monocular/fisiologia
Córtex Visual/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adaptação Fisiológica/fisiologia
Animais
Feminino
Masculino
Camundongos
Plasticidade Neuronal/fisiologia
Campos Visuais/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170818
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170818
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170604
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1193-16.2017


  7 / 2036 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28510624
[Au] Autor:Christiansen JH; D'Antona AD; Shevell SK
[Ad] Endereço:Center for Autisme, Herlev Hovedgade, Herlev, Denmark.
[Ti] Título:Chromatic interocular-switch rivalry.
[So] Source:J Vis;17(5):9, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:1534-7362
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Interocular-switch rivalry (also known as stimulus rivalry) is a kind of binocular rivalry in which two rivalrous images are swapped between the eyes several times a second. The result is stable periods of one image and then the other, with stable intervals that span many eye swaps (Logothetis, Leopold, & Sheinberg, 1996). Previous work used this close kin of binocular rivalry with rivalrous forms. Experiments here test whether chromatic interocular-switch rivalry, in which the swapped stimuli differ in only chromaticity, results in slow alternation between two colors. Swapping equiluminant rivalrous chromaticities at 3.75 Hz resulted in slow perceptual color alternation, with one or the other color often continuously visible for two seconds or longer (during which there were 15+ eye swaps). A well-known theory for sustained percepts from interocular-switch rivalry with form is inhibitory competition between binocular neurons driven by monocular neurons with matched orientation tuning in each eye; such binocular neurons would produce a stable response when a given orientation is swapped between the eyes. A similar model can account for the percepts here from chromatic interocular-switch rivalry and is underpinned by the neurophysiological finding that color-preferring binocular neurons are driven by monocular neurons from each eye with well-matched chromatic selectivity (Peirce, Solomon, Forte, & Lennie, 2008). In contrast to chromatic interocular-switch rivalry, luminance interocular-switch rivalry with swapped stimuli that differ in only luminance did not result in slowly alternating percepts of different brightnesses.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Percepção de Cores/fisiologia
Disparidade Visual/fisiologia
Visão Binocular/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Estimulação Luminosa
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170825
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170825
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170517
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1167/17.5.9


  8 / 2036 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28494496
[Au] Autor:Schmidtmann G; Ruiz T; Reynaud A; Spiegel DP; Laguë-Beauvais M; Hess RF; Farivar R
[Ad] Endereço:Traumatic Brain Injury Program, The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada 2McGill Vision Research Unit, Department of Ophthalmology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
[Ti] Título:Sensitivity to Binocular Disparity is Reduced by Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.
[So] Source:Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci;58(5):2630-2635, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:1552-5783
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Purpose: The impairment of visual functions is one of the most common complaints following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Traumatic brain injury-associated visual deficits include blurred vision, reading problems, and eye strain. In addition, previous studies have found evidence that TBI can diminish early cortical visual processing, particularly for second-order stimuli. We investigated whether cortical processing of binocular disparity is also affected by mTBI. Methods: In order to investigate the influence of mTBI on global stereopsis, we measured the quick Disparity Sensitivity Function (qDSF) in 22 patients with mTBI. Patients with manifest strabismus and double vision were excluded. Compared with standard clinical tests, the qDSF is unique in that it offers a quick and accurate estimate of thresholds across the whole spatial frequency range. Results: Results show that disparity sensitivity in the mTBI patients were significantly reduced compared with the normative dataset (n = 61). The peak spatial frequency was not affected. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the reduced disparity sensitivity in patients with mTBI is more likely caused by cortical changes (e.g., axonal shearing, or reduced interhemispheric communication) rather than oculomotor dysfunction.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Lesões Encefálicas Traumáticas/complicações
Limiar Sensorial
Transtornos da Visão/fisiopatologia
Disparidade Visual/fisiologia
Visão Binocular/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Lesões Encefálicas Traumáticas/diagnóstico
Movimentos Oculares/fisiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Estimulação Luminosa
Índices de Gravidade do Trauma
Transtornos da Visão/etiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170719
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170719
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170512
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1167/iovs.17-21845


  9 / 2036 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28473649
[Au] Autor:Norcia AM; Gerhard HE; Meredith WJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 amnorcia@stanford.edu.
[Ti] Título:Development of Relative Disparity Sensitivity in Human Visual Cortex.
[So] Source:J Neurosci;37(23):5608-5619, 2017 Jun 07.
[Is] ISSN:1529-2401
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Stereopsis is the primary cue underlying our ability to make fine depth judgments. In adults, depth discriminations are supported largely by relative rather than absolute binocular disparity, and depth is perceived primarily for horizontal rather than vertical disparities. Although human infants begin to exhibit disparity-specific responses between 3 and 5 months of age, it is not known how relative disparity mechanisms develop. Here we show that the specialization for relative disparity is highly immature in 4- to 6-month-old infants but is adult-like in 4- to 7-year-old children. Disparity-tuning functions for horizontal and vertical disparities were measured using the visual evoked potential. Infant relative disparity thresholds, unlike those of adults, were equal for vertical and horizontal disparities. Their horizontal disparity thresholds were a factor of ∼10 higher than adults, but their vertical disparity thresholds differed by a factor of only ∼4. Horizontal relative disparity thresholds for 4- to 7-year-old children were comparable with those of adults at ∼0.5 arcmin. To test whether infant immaturity was due to spatial limitations or insensitivity to interocular correlation, highly suprathreshold horizontal and vertical disparities were presented in alternate regions of the display, and the interocular correlation of the interdigitated regions was varied from 0% to 100%. This manipulation regulated the availability of coarse-scale relative disparity cues. Adult and infant responses both increased with increasing interocular correlation by similar magnitudes, but adult responses increased much more for horizontal disparities, further evidence for qualitatively immature stereopsis based on relative disparity at 4-6 months of age. Stereopsis, our ability to sense depth from horizontal image disparity, is among the finest spatial discriminations made by the primate visual system. Fine stereoscopic depth discriminations depend critically on comparisons of disparity relationships in the image that are supported by relative disparity cues rather than the estimation of single, absolute disparities. Very young human and macaque infants are sensitive to absolute disparity, but no previous study has specifically studied the development of relative disparity sensitivity, a hallmark feature of adult stereopsis. Here, using high-density EEG recordings, we show that 4- to 6-month-old infants display both quantitative and qualitative response immaturities for relative disparity information. Relative disparity responses are adult-like no later than 4-7 years of age.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Envelhecimento/fisiologia
Percepção de Profundidade/fisiologia
Rede Nervosa/fisiologia
Disparidade Visual/fisiologia
Córtex Visual/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Masculino
Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
Sensibilidade e Especificidade
Análise e Desempenho de Tarefas
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170821
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170821
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170506
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3570-16.2017


  10 / 2036 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28192091
[Au] Autor:Alvarez TL; Kim EH; Yaramothu C; Granger-Donetti B
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biomedical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA. Electronic address: tara.l.alvarez@njit.edu.
[Ti] Título:The influence of age on adaptation of disparity vergence and phoria.
[So] Source:Vision Res;133:1-11, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5646
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:A paucity of research exists to investigate whether the normal aging process influences the ability to adapt disparity vergence and phoria. Vergence eye movements and dissociated phoria were recorded from 49 healthy subjects (ages 20-70years) using an objective eye movement tracking system. Four-degree vergence responses were modified using a double-step protocol. Dynamics of vergence were quantified via peak velocity. The phoria adaptation experiment measured the magnitude (net change in phoria level) and rate (magnitude divided by the time constant) of phoria adaption during 5min of sustained fixation on a binocular target (40cm/8.44° from midline). The magnitude of phoria adaptation decreased as a function of age (r=-0.33; p=0.04). The ability to adapt vergence peak velocity and the rate of phoria adaptation showed no significant age-related influence (p>0.05). The data suggest that the ability to modify the disparity vergence system and the rate of phoria adaptation are not dependent on age; whereas, the magnitude of phoria adaptation decreases as part of the normal adult aging process. These results have clinical and basic science implications because one should consider age when assessing the changes in the magnitude of phoria adaptation which can be abnormal in those with oculomotor dysfunctions.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Adaptação Ocular/fisiologia
Envelhecimento/fisiologia
Convergência Ocular/fisiologia
Estrabismo/fisiopatologia
Disparidade Visual/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Acomodação Ocular/fisiologia
Adaptação Fisiológica/fisiologia
Adulto
Idoso
Movimentos Oculares/fisiologia
Feminino
Fixação Ocular/fisiologia
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Estimulação Luminosa/métodos
Visão Binocular/fisiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170804
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170804
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170214
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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