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Pesquisa : F02.784.629.529.223 [Categoria DeCS]
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[PMID]:28454581
[Au] Autor:Harrison CJ; Könings KD; Schuwirth LWT; Wass V; van der Vleuten CPM
[Ad] Endereço:Keele University School of Medicine, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK. c.j.harrison@keele.ac.uk.
[Ti] Título:Changing the culture of assessment: the dominance of the summative assessment paradigm.
[So] Source:BMC Med Educ;17(1):73, 2017 Apr 28.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6920
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Despite growing evidence of the benefits of including assessment for learning strategies within programmes of assessment, practical implementation of these approaches is often problematical. Organisational culture change is often hindered by personal and collective beliefs which encourage adherence to the existing organisational paradigm. We aimed to explore how these beliefs influenced proposals to redesign a summative assessment culture in order to improve students' use of assessment-related feedback. METHODS: Using the principles of participatory design, a mixed group comprising medical students, clinical teachers and senior faculty members was challenged to develop radical solutions to improve the use of post-assessment feedback. Follow-up interviews were conducted with individual members of the group to explore their personal beliefs about the proposed redesign. Data were analysed using a socio-cultural lens. RESULTS: Proposed changes were dominated by a shared belief in the primacy of the summative assessment paradigm, which prevented radical redesign solutions from being accepted by group members. Participants' prior assessment experiences strongly influenced proposals for change. As participants had largely only experienced a summative assessment culture, they found it difficult to conceptualise radical change in the assessment culture. Although all group members participated, students were less successful at persuading the group to adopt their ideas. Faculty members and clinical teachers often used indirect techniques to close down discussions. The strength of individual beliefs became more apparent in the follow-up interviews. CONCLUSIONS: Naïve epistemologies and prior personal experiences were influential in the assessment redesign but were usually not expressed explicitly in a group setting, perhaps because of cultural conventions of politeness. In order to successfully implement a change in assessment culture, firmly-held intuitive beliefs about summative assessment will need to be clearly understood as a first step.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Difusão de Inovações
Avaliação Educacional/métodos
Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Educação de Graduação em Medicina
Feedback Formativo
Seres Humanos
Entrevistas como Assunto
Pesquisa Qualitativa
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180123
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180123
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170430
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12909-017-0912-5


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[PMID]:28742711
[Au] Autor:George BC; Bohnen JD; Williams RG; Meyerson SL; Schuller MC; Clark MJ; Meier AH; Torbeck L; Mandell SP; Mullen JT; Smink DS; Scully RE; Chipman JG; Auyang ED; Terhune KP; Wise PE; Choi JN; Foley EF; Dimick JB; Choti MA; Soper NJ; Lillemoe KD; Zwischenberger JB; Dunnington GL; DaRosa DA; Fryer JP; Procedural Learning and Safety Collaborative (PLSC)
[Ad] Endereço:*Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI †Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA ‡Indiana University, Bloomington, IN §Northwestern University, Evanston, IL ¶University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI ||SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY **University of Washington, Seattle, WA ††Brigham and Williams Hospital, Boston, MA ‡‡Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA §§University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN ¶¶University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM ||||Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN ***Washington University, St. Louis, MO †††UT Southwestern, Dallas, TX ‡‡‡University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI §§§University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.
[Ti] Título:Readiness of US General Surgery Residents for Independent Practice.
[So] Source:Ann Surg;266(4):582-594, 2017 10.
[Is] ISSN:1528-1140
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the current state of the General Surgery (GS) residency training model by investigating resident operative performance and autonomy. BACKGROUND: The American Board of Surgery has designated 132 procedures as being "Core" to the practice of GS. GS residents are expected to be able to safely and independently perform those procedures by the time they graduate. There is growing concern that not all residents achieve that standard. Lack of operative autonomy may play a role. METHODS: Attendings in 14 General Surgery programs were trained to use a) the 5-level System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning (SIMPL) Performance scale to assess resident readiness for independent practice and b) the 4-level Zwisch scale to assess the level of guidance (ie, autonomy) they provided to residents during specific procedures. Ratings were collected immediately after cases that involved a categorical GS resident. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and supplemented with Bayesian ordinal model-based estimation. RESULTS: A total of 444 attending surgeons rated 536 categorical residents after 10,130 procedures. Performance: from the first to the last year of training, the proportion of Performance ratings for Core procedures (n = 6931) at "Practice Ready" or above increased from 12.3% to 77.1%. The predicted probability that a typical trainee would be rated as Competent after performing an average Core procedure on an average complexity patient during the last week of residency training is 90.5% (95% CI: 85.7%-94%). This falls to 84.6% for more complex patients and to less than 80% for more difficult Core procedures. Autonomy: for all procedures, the proportion of Zwisch ratings indicating meaningful autonomy ("Passive Help" or "Supervision Only") increased from 15.1% to 65.7% from the first to the last year of training. For the Core procedures performed by residents in their final 6 months of training (cholecystectomy, inguinal/femoral hernia repair, appendectomy, ventral hernia repair, and partial colectomy), the proportion of Zwisch ratings (n = 357) indicating near-independence ("Supervision Only") was 33.3%. CONCLUSIONS: US General Surgery residents are not universally ready to independently perform Core procedures by the time they complete residency training. Progressive resident autonomy is also limited. It is unknown if the amount of autonomy residents do achieve is sufficient to ensure readiness for the entire spectrum of independent practice.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Competência Clínica
Cirurgia Geral/educação
Internato e Residência/normas
Autonomia Profissional
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Educação Baseada em Competências
Avaliação Educacional/normas
Feedback Formativo
Cirurgia Geral/normas
Seres Humanos
Estudos Prospectivos
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171214
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171214
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170726
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/SLA.0000000000002414


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[PMID]:29065021
[Au] Autor:Cendán JC; Castiglioni A; Johnson TR; Eakins M; Verduin ML; Asmar A; Metcalf D; Hernandez C
[Ad] Endereço:J.C. Cendán is professor and chairman, Department of Medical Education, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida; ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2744-4838. A. Castiglioni is associate professor, Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Medical Education, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida. T.R. Johnson is director, Office of Assessment and Evaluation, and assistant professor of health sciences informatics, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. M. Eakins is creative lead, University of Central Florida, Institute for Simulation and Training, Mixed Emerging Technology Integration Lab, Orlando, Florida. M.L. Verduin is professor and associate dean for students, Department of Medical Education and Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida. A. Asmar is associate professor and program director, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Medical Education, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida. D. Metcalf is director, Mixed Emerging Technology Integration Laboratory, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida. C. Hernandez is associate professor, Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Medical Education, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida.
[Ti] Título:Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of the Impact of Adoption of a Mobile Application for the Assessment of Professionalism in Medical Trainees.
[So] Source:Acad Med;92(11S Association of American Medical Colleges Learn Serve Lead: Proceedings of the 56th Annual Research in Medical Education Sessions):S33-S42, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1938-808X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PURPOSE: Capturing either lapses or excellence in behaviors related to medical professionalism is difficult. The authors report a mixed-methods analysis of a novel mobile platform for assessing medical professionalism in a training environment. METHOD: A mobile Web-based platform to facilitate professionalism assessment in a situated clinical setting (Professional Mobile Monitoring of Behaviors [PROMOBES]) was developed. A professionalism framework consisting of six domains (reliability, adaptability, peer relationships, upholding principles, team relationships, and scholarship) encompassing 25 subelements underpins the reporting structure. This pilot study involved 26 faculty supervising 93 medical trainees at two sites from January 12 to August 8, 2016. Notable professionalism behaviors were linked to the framework domains and elements; narrative details about incidences were captured on mobile devices. Surveys gauged the technological functionality and impact of PROMOBES on faculty assessment of professionalism. Qualitative focus groups were employed to elucidate user experience. RESULTS: Although users anticipated PROMOBES's utility would be for reporting lapses in professionalism, 94.7% of reports were for commendation. Comfort assessing professionalism (P = .04) and recognition of the reporting procedures for professionalism-related concerns (P = .01) improved. PROMOBES attained high acceptance ratings. Focus group analysis revealed that the explicit connection to the professionalism framework was powerful; similarly, the near real-time reporting capability, multiple observer inputs, and positive feedback facilitation were strengths. CONCLUSIONS: Making the professionalism framework visible and accessible via a mobile platform significantly strengthens faculty knowledge and behaviors regarding assessment. The strong desire to capture positive behaviors was an unexpected finding.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos
Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos
Medicina Interna/educação
Internato e Residência
Aplicativos Móveis
Pediatria/educação
Competência Profissional
Profissionalismo/normas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Estágio Clínico
Docentes de Medicina
Feminino
Grupos Focais
Feedback Formativo
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Projetos Piloto
Pesquisa Qualitativa
Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
Estudantes de Medicina
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171030
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171030
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/ACM.0000000000001922


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[PMID]:29065020
[Au] Autor:Abbott EF; Thompson W; Pandian TK; Zendejas B; Farley DR; Cook DA
[Ad] Endereço:E.F. Abbott is a simulation fellow, Mayo Clinic Multidisciplinary Simulation Center, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, and adjunct instructor of internal medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5713-4809. W. Thompson is a medical student, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota. T.K. Pandian is a resident, Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. B. Zendejas is a pediatric surgery fellow, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. D.R. Farley is professor of surgery and consultant, Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. D.A. Cook is professor of medicine and professor of medical education; research chair, Mayo Clinic Multidisciplinary Simulation Center; director of research, Office of Applied Scholarship and Education Science; and Consultant in the Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota; ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2383-4633.
[Ti] Título:Personalized Video Feedback and Repeated Task Practice Improve Laparoscopic Knot-Tying Skills: Two Controlled Trials.
[So] Source:Acad Med;92(11S Association of American Medical Colleges Learn Serve Lead: Proceedings of the 56th Annual Research in Medical Education Sessions):S26-S32, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1938-808X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PURPOSE: Compare the effect of personalized feedback (PF) vs. task demonstration (TD), both delivered via video, on laparoscopic knot-tying skills and perceived workload; and evaluate the effect of repeated practice. METHOD: General surgery interns and research fellows completed four repetitions of a simulated laparoscopic knot-tying task at one-month intervals. Midway between repetitions, participants received via e-mail either a TD video (demonstration by an expert) or a PF video (video of their own performance with voiceover from a blinded senior surgeon). Each participant received at least one video per format, with sequence randomly assigned. Outcomes included performance scores and NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) scores. To evaluate the effectiveness of repeated practice, scores from these trainees on a separate delayed retention test were compared against historical controls who did not have scheduled repetitions. RESULTS: Twenty-one trainees completed the randomized study. Mean change in performance scores was significantly greater for those receiving PF (difference = 23.1 of 150 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0, 46.2], P = .05). Perceived workload was also significantly reduced (difference = -3.0 of 20 [95% CI: -5.8, -0.3], P = .04). Compared with historical controls (N = 93), the 21 with scheduled repeated practice had higher scores on the laparoscopic knot-tying assessment two weeks after the final repetition (difference = 1.5 of 10 [95% CI: 0.2, 2.8], P = .02). CONCLUSIONS: Personalized video feedback improves trainees' procedural performance and perceived workload compared with a task demonstration video. Brief monthly practice sessions support skill acquisition and retention.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Competência Clínica
Feedback Formativo
Cirurgia Geral/educação
Laparoscopia/educação
Prática (Psicologia)
Técnicas de Sutura/educação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Gravação em Vídeo
Carga de Trabalho
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171030
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171030
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/ACM.0000000000001924


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[PMID]:28985846
[Au] Autor:Shaughness G; Georgoff PE; Sandhu G; Leininger L; Nikolian VC; Reddy R; Hughes DT
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Surgery, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
[Ti] Título:Assessment of clinical feedback given to medical students via an electronic feedback system.
[So] Source:J Surg Res;218:174-179, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8673
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The feedback medical students receive during clinical rotations, traditionally verbal and not formally captured, plays a critical role in student development. This study evaluates written daily feedback given to students through a novel web-based feedback system. METHODS: A Minute Feedback System was used to collect feedback given to medical students during their surgery clerkship from May 2015-April 2016. Using qualitative content analysis, feedback comments were categorized as: encouraging, corrective, specific, and nonspecific. Effective feedback was a combination of specific and either corrective or encouraging feedback; ineffective feedback contained only nonspecific comments; mediocre feedback contained elements of both effective and ineffective comments. RESULTS: 3191 feedback requests were sent by medical students and 2029 faculty/resident feedback responses were received. The overall response rate was 62%. Nonspecific feedback comprised 80% of faculty, 83% of senior resident, and 78% of junior resident comments. Specific feedback was given by only 35% of faculty, 17% of senior residents, and 26% of junior residents. Faculty provided Effective feedback in only 16% of comments, senior residents 8%, and junior residents 17%. Mediocre feedback comprised 13% of faculty, 9% of senior resident, and 7% of junior resident comments. Ineffective feedback comprised 67% of all feedback: 60% of faculty, 72% of senior resident, and 68% of junior resident feedback. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of resident and faculty feedback to medical students using an electronic, email-based application during their surgery clerkship was nonspecific and encouraging and therefore of limited effectiveness. This presents an opportunity for resident/faculty development and education regarding optimal feedback techniques.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Educação Médica/estatística & dados numéricos
Feedback Formativo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Internet
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171024
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171024
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171008
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28966184
[Au] Autor:Partido BB
[Ad] Endereço:Prof. Partido is Assistant Professor, Division of Dental Hygiene, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University. partido.1@osu.edu.
[Ti] Título:Dental Hygiene Students' Self-Assessment of Ergonomics Utilizing Photography.
[So] Source:J Dent Educ;81(10):1194-1202, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1930-7837
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Due to postural demands, dental professionals are at high risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Dental clinicians' lack of ergonomic awareness may impede the clinical application of recommendations to improve their posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether feedback involving photography and self-assessment would improve dental hygiene students' ergonomic scores and accuracy of their ergonomic self-assessments. The study involved a randomized control design and used a convenience sample of all 32 junior-year dental hygiene students enrolled in the autumn 2016 term in The Ohio State University baccalaureate dental hygiene program. Sixteen students were randomly assigned to each of two groups (control and training). At weeks one and four, all participants were photographed and completed ergonomic self-evaluations using the Modified-Dental Operator Posture Assessment Instrument (M-DOPAI). During weeks two and three, participants in the training group were photographed again and used those photographs to complete ergonomic self-assessments. All participants' pre-training and post-training photographs were given ergonomic scores by three raters. Students' self-assessments in the control group and faculty evaluations of the training group showed significant improvement in scores over time (F(1,60)=4.25, p<0.05). In addition, the accuracy of self-assessment significantly improved for students in the training group (F(1,30)=8.29, p<0.01). In this study, dental hygiene students' self-assessments using photographs resulted in improvements in their ergonomic scores and increased accuracy of their ergonomic self-assessments. Any improvement in ergonomic score or awareness can help reduce the risks for WMSDs, especially among dental clinicians.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Higienistas Dentários/educação
Profilaxia Dentária
Ergonomia/métodos
Saúde do Trabalhador/educação
Fotografia
Autoavaliação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Feedback Formativo
Seres Humanos
Estudantes
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:D; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171003
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.21815/JDE.017.077


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[PMID]:28815353
[Au] Autor:Kumar NL; Perencevich ML; Trier JS
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. nlkumar@partners.org.
[Ti] Título:Perceptions of the Inpatient Training Experience: A Nationwide Survey of Gastroenterology Program Directors and Fellows.
[So] Source:Dig Dis Sci;62(10):2631-2647, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2568
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Inpatient training is a key component of gastroenterology (GI) fellowship programs nationwide, yet little is known about perceptions of the inpatient training experience. AIM: To compare the content, objectives and quality of the inpatient training experience as perceived by program directors (PD) and fellows in US ACGME-accredited GI fellowship programs. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide, online-based survey of GI PDs and fellows at the conclusion of the 2016 academic year. We queried participants about (1) the current models of inpatient training, (2) the content, objectives, and quality of the inpatient training experience, and (3) the frequency and quality of educational activities on the inpatient service. We analyzed five-point Likert items and rank assessments as continuous variables by an independent t test and compared proportions using the Chi-square test. RESULTS: Survey response rate was 48.4% (75/155) for PDs and a total of 194 fellows completed the survey, with both groups reporting the general GI consult team (>90%) as the primary model of inpatient training. PDs and fellows agreed on the ranking of all queried responsibilities of the inpatient fellow to develop during the inpatient service. However, fellows indicated that attendings spent less time teaching and provided less formal feedback than that perceived by PDs (p < 0.0001). PDs rated the overall quality of the inpatient training experience (p < 0.0001) and education on the wards (p = 0.0003) as better than overall ratings by fellows. CONCLUSION: Although GI fellows and PDs agree on the importance of specific fellow responsibilities on the inpatient service, fellows report experiencing less teaching and feedback from attendings than that perceived by PDs. Committing more time to education and assessment may improve fellows' perceptions of the inpatient training experience.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos
Docentes de Medicina/psicologia
Gastroenterologistas/educação
Gastroenterologistas/psicologia
Gastroenterologia/educação
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Pacientes Internados
Internato e Residência
Percepção
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Distribuição de Qui-Quadrado
Competência Clínica
Bolsas de Estudo
Feminino
Feedback Formativo
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde
Inquéritos e Questionários
Carga de Trabalho
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:EDITORIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171024
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171024
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170818
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10620-017-4711-y


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[PMID]:28806791
[Au] Autor:Lipner RS; Brossman BG; Samonte KM; Durning SJ
[Ad] Endereço:From American Board of Internal Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland.
[Ti] Título:Effect of Access to an Electronic Medical Resource on Performance Characteristics of a Certification Examination: A Randomized Controlled Trial.
[So] Source:Ann Intern Med;167(5):302-310, 2017 Sep 05.
[Is] ISSN:1539-3704
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Background: Electronic resources are increasingly used in medical practice. Their use during high-stakes certification examinations has been advocated by many experts, but whether doing so would affect the capacity to differentiate between high and low abilities is unknown. Objective: To determine the effect of electronic resources on examination performance characteristics. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Medical certification program. Participants: 825 physicians initially certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) who passed the Internal Medicine Certification examination or sat for the Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification (IM-MOC) examination in 2012 to 2015. Intervention: Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions: closed book using typical or additional time, or open book (that is, UpToDate [Wolters Kluwer]) using typical or additional time. All participants took the same modified version of the IM-MOC examination. Measurements: Primary outcomes included item difficulty (how easy or difficult the question was), item discrimination (how well the question differentiated between high and low abilities), and average question response time. Secondary outcomes included examination dimensionality (that is, the number of factors measured) and test-taking strategy. Item response theory was used to calculate question characteristics. Analysis of variance compared differences among conditions. Results: Closed-book conditions took significantly less time than open-book conditions (mean, 79.2 seconds [95% CI, 78.5 to 79.9 seconds] vs. 110.3 seconds [CI, 109.2 to 111.4 seconds] per question). Mean discrimination was statistically significantly higher for open-book conditions (0.34 [CI, 0.32 to 0.35] vs. 0.39 [CI, 0.37 to 0.41] per question). A strong single dimension showed that the examination measured the same factor with or without the resource. Limitation: Only 1 electronic resource was evaluated. Conclusion: Inclusion of an electronic resource with time constraints did not adversely affect test performance and did not change the specific skill or factor targeted by the examination. Further study on the effect of resource inclusion on other examinations is warranted. Primary Funding Source: ABIM Foundation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Certificação/métodos
Sistemas de Apoio a Decisões Clínicas
Avaliação Educacional/métodos
Medicina Interna/educação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Competência Clínica
Feminino
Feedback Formativo
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Fatores de Tempo
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170912
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170912
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170815
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.7326/M16-2843


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[PMID]:28766408
[Au] Autor:Kawamura K; Shinya M; Kobayashi H; Obata H; Kuwata M; Nakazawa K
[Ad] Endereço:a Department of Life Sciences , Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo , Tokyo , Japan.
[Ti] Título:Baseball pitching accuracy: an examination of various parameters when evaluating pitch locations.
[So] Source:Sports Biomech;16(3):399-410, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1476-3141
[Cp] País de publicação:Scotland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This study evaluated baseball pitching accuracy using a variety of parameters to quantify pitching errors and analysed the validity of the accuracy measurements by comparing the outcomes of two small groups of pitchers. Several professional (n = 5) and high school (n = 8) pitchers threw 30 pitches each, including 20 fastballs and 10 breaking balls. To assess pitching accuracy, pitch locations relative to the catcher's mitt (as the target) were evaluated with various parameters, including major/minor radius, an area of 95% confidence ellipse, absolute error, constant error and pitch location trajectory. Compared to the high school pitchers, the professional pitchers exhibited shorter major and minor radii in their 20 fastball pitches (p < 0.05), more accurate control in the lateral direction (p < 0.05), and shorter pitch location trajectories (p < 0.05). The evaluation methods presented in this study can objectively assess pitching accuracy and may thus provide useful coaching feedback with visual information.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Desempenho Atlético/fisiologia
Beisebol/fisiologia
Destreza Motora/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Fenômenos Biomecânicos
Feedback Formativo
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170918
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170918
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170803
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/14763141.2017.1332236


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[PMID]:28750005
[Au] Autor:Neher T; Azizi AH; Cheng S
[Ad] Endereço:Institute for Neural Computation, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
[Ti] Título:From grid cells to place cells with realistic field sizes.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0181618, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:While grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) of rodents have multiple, regularly arranged firing fields, place cells in the cornu ammonis (CA) regions of the hippocampus mostly have single spatial firing fields. Since there are extensive projections from MEC to the CA regions, many models have suggested that a feedforward network can transform grid cell firing into robust place cell firing. However, these models generate place fields that are consistently too small compared to those recorded in experiments. Here, we argue that it is implausible that grid cell activity alone can be transformed into place cells with robust place fields of realistic size in a feedforward network. We propose two solutions to this problem. Firstly, weakly spatially modulated cells, which are abundant throughout EC, provide input to downstream place cells along with grid cells. This simple model reproduces many place cell characteristics as well as results from lesion studies. Secondly, the recurrent connections between place cells in the CA3 network generate robust and realistic place fields. Both mechanisms could work in parallel in the hippocampal formation and this redundancy might account for the robustness of place cell responses to a range of disruptions of the hippocampal circuitry.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Modelos Neurológicos
Rede Nervosa/citologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Potenciais de Ação
Animais
Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Região CA3 Hipocampal/citologia
Simulação por Computador
Feedback Formativo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170928
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170928
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0181618



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